A report on IBM 2741

IBM 2741 terminal
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IBM 2741 terminal with APL keyboard

Printing computer terminal that was introduced in 1965.

- IBM 2741
IBM 2741 terminal

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Overall

The DEC VT100, a widely emulated computer terminal

Computer terminal

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Electronic or electromechanical hardware device that can be used for entering data into, and transcribing data from, a computer or a computing system.

Electronic or electromechanical hardware device that can be used for entering data into, and transcribing data from, a computer or a computing system.

The DEC VT100, a widely emulated computer terminal
IBM 2741, a widely emulated computer terminal in the 1960s and 1970s (keyboard/printer)
A Teletype Model 33 ASR teleprinter, usable as a terminal
Closeup of an IBM 2741 printing terminal, which used a changeable Selectric "golfball" typing element and was faster than the earlier teletype machines
IBM 2250 Model 4, including light pen and programmed function keyboard
A Televideo ASCII character mode terminal
A typical text terminal produces input and displays output and errors
Nano text editor running in the xterm terminal emulator

Custom-designs keyboard/printer terminals that came later included the IBM 2741 (1965) and the DECwriter (1970).

IBM Selectric

IBM Selectric typewriter

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Highly successful line of electric typewriters introduced by IBM on 31 July 1961.

Highly successful line of electric typewriters introduced by IBM on 31 July 1961.

IBM Selectric
A Selectric typing element
IBM Selectric I
IBM Selectric II (with dual Latin/Hebrew element and keyboard). The switch to the right of the backspace key shifts the machine to right-to-left typing, as is required for Hebrew. Note also the two typing position scales, one numbered left to right, the other right to left.
Selectric II dual Latin/Hebrew Hadar element
IBM Selectric MC-82 - model with MC composer module
IBM Magnetic Card
Sample of IBM Magnetic Card Composer output (Press Roman 10pt font family)
American typewriter keyboard layout
Selectric III keyboard layout
88-character IBM typing elements (one OCR) with clip, €2 coin for scale
Home computer hobbyist with a Selectric printing terminal (1978)
Selectric typing element, with a daisywheel printer element in the foreground

The MC/ST was also available in a "communicating" version which could emulate an IBM 2741 terminal or run its native Correspondence Code.

APL (programming language)

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Programming language developed in the 1960s by Kenneth E. Iverson.

Programming language developed in the 1960s by Kenneth E. Iverson.

IBM typeballs and typewheel containing APL Greek characters.
A programmer's view of the IBM 2741 keyboard layout with the APL typing element print head inserted
British APL Association (BAPLA) conference laptop bag.

This was used on paper printing terminal workstations using the Selectric typewriter and typing element mechanism, such as the IBM 1050 and IBM 2741 terminal.

A male D-subminiature connector used for a serial port on an IBM PC compatible computer along with the serial port symbol

Serial port

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Serial communication interface through which information transfers in or out sequentially one bit at a time.

Serial communication interface through which information transfers in or out sequentially one bit at a time.

A male D-subminiature connector used for a serial port on an IBM PC compatible computer along with the serial port symbol
A Cisco rollover cable using the 8P8C Yost standard
Pair of female Mini DIN-8 connectors used for RS-422 serial ports on a Macintosh LC computer

Also possible, but rarely used, is most significant bit first; this was used, for example, by the IBM 2741 printing terminal.

IBM Administrative Terminal System

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The IBM Administrative Terminal System, also known as ATS/360, provided text- and data-management tools for working with documents to users of IBM System/360 systems.

The IBM Administrative Terminal System, also known as ATS/360, provided text- and data-management tools for working with documents to users of IBM System/360 systems.

Initially, ATS/360 supported only IBM 2741 typewriter terminals.

IBM 3767 Communication Terminal

IBM 3767

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Serial printer terminal that employed dot matrix print-head technology and, for the first time, the Synchronous Data Link Control communications protocol set under IBM's Systems Network Architecture (SNA).

Serial printer terminal that employed dot matrix print-head technology and, for the first time, the Synchronous Data Link Control communications protocol set under IBM's Systems Network Architecture (SNA).

IBM 3767 Communication Terminal

For such purposes, printer terminals such as the IBM 2741, using the traditional asynchronous serial communication (start-stop signaling), and display terminals such as IBM 2260 and IBM 3270, using the new communications protocol set (Binary Synchronous Communications or BSC), became available.