I Sing the Body Electric (short story collection)

I Sing the Body Electric1969 short storyAny Friend of Nicholas Nickleby's is a Friend of MineI Sing the Body Electric (Bradbury)I Sing the Body Electric!I Sing the Body Electric'' (short story collection)novel of the same nameshort story of the same name
I Sing the Body Electric!wikipedia
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1969 in literature

19691970published in 1969
I Sing the Body Electric! is a 1969 collection of short stories by Ray Bradbury.

Ray Bradbury

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I Sing the Body Electric! is a 1969 collection of short stories by Ray Bradbury.
Predominantly known for writing the iconic dystopian novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953), and his science-fiction and horror-story collections, The Martian Chronicles (1950), The Illustrated Man (1951), and I Sing the Body Electric (1969), Bradbury was one of the most celebrated 20th- and 21st-century American writers.

Leaves of Grass

Excelsior" (Whitman)grass leavesLeaves of Grass: A Choral Symphony
The book takes its name from an included short story of the same title, which in turn took the title from a poem by Walt Whitman published in his collection Leaves of Grass.

I Sing the Body Electric (The Twilight Zone)

I Sing the Body Electric100th episode of ''The Twilight ZoneI Sing The Body Electric!
The title story, "I Sing the Body Electric!", was adapted from a 1962 Twilight Zone episode of the same name, which Bradbury had written.
The script was written by Ray Bradbury, and became the basis for his short story of the same name, published in 1969, itself named after a Walt Whitman poem.

The Electric Grandmother

It was later adapted as a 1982 television movie, The Electric Grandmother, starring Maureen Stapleton.
The Electric Grandmother is a television movie that originally aired January 17, 1982, on NBC as a 60-minute Project Peacock special, based on the science fiction short story "I Sing the Body Electric" by Ray Bradbury.

I Sing the Body Electric (poem)

I Sing the Body ElectricI Sing the Body Electric" (poem) Sing the Body Electric
The book takes its name from an included short story of the same title, which in turn took the title from a poem by Walt Whitman published in his collection Leaves of Grass.

Walt Whitman

WhitmanWhitmanesqueWalter Whitman
The book takes its name from an included short story of the same title, which in turn took the title from a poem by Walt Whitman published in his collection Leaves of Grass.

Long After Midnight

and Other Stories, which includes all the stories from the original collection as well as the following stories from Long After Midnight'':

Joanna Russ

Russ, JoannaRussRuss, J.
Joanna Russ reviewed the collection favorably, saying "This is third-rate Bradbury, mostly. It is silly. It totally perverts the quotation from Whitman which it uses in its title. It is very good."

The New York Times

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The New York Times also received Body Electric favorably, saying "Whatever the premise, the author retains an enthusiasm for both the natural world and the supernatural that sends a tingle of excitement through even the flimsiest conceit."

The Twilight Zone (1959 TV series)

The Twilight ZoneTwilight ZoneThe Twilight Zone'' (1959 TV series)
The title story, "I Sing the Body Electric!", was adapted from a 1962 Twilight Zone episode of the same name, which Bradbury had written.

Maureen Stapleton

It was later adapted as a 1982 television movie, The Electric Grandmother, starring Maureen Stapleton.

Short story

short storiesshort story writershort fiction
I Sing the Body Electric! is a 1969 collection of short stories by Ray Bradbury.

Alfred A. Knopf

KnopfAlfred A. Knopf, Inc.Knopf Books for Young Readers

List of fictional robots and androids

fictional robotList of fictional robots and androids: Animated shorts/seriesadvanced robots

I Sing the Body Electric (album)

I Sing the Body ElectricI Sing the Body Electric'' (album)
The album takes its title from an 1855 poem by Walt Whitman and a 1969 short story by Ray Bradbury.

Here There Be Tygers

This led to the end of Ray Bradbury's brief association with the show, which resulted in just one of his stories ("I Sing the Body Electric") being used.