Ian Hamilton (British Army officer)

Ian HamiltonSir Ian HamiltonGeneral Sir Ian HamiltonGeneral HamiltonIan Standish Monteith HamiltonGeneral Ian HamiltonLieutenant-General Sir Ian Hamilton General '''Sir Ian Standish Monteith HamiltonColonel Ian HamiltonGeneral Sir Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton
General Sir Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton, (16 January 1853 – 12 October 1947) was a senior officer in the British Army, who is most notable for commanding the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force during the Gallipoli Campaign.wikipedia
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Gallipoli Campaign

GallipoliDardanellesBattle of Gallipoli
General Sir Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton, (16 January 1853 – 12 October 1947) was a senior officer in the British Army, who is most notable for commanding the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force during the Gallipoli Campaign.
Kitchener appointed General Sir Ian Hamilton to command the 78,000 men of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force (MEF).

Mediterranean Expeditionary Force

Expeditionary ForceMediterraneanSalonika Expeditionary Force
General Sir Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton, (16 January 1853 – 12 October 1947) was a senior officer in the British Army, who is most notable for commanding the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force during the Gallipoli Campaign. In March 1915 Herbert Kitchener appointed Hamilton to command the Allied Mediterranean Expeditionary Force to gain control of the Dardanelles straits from Turkey and to capture Constantinople.
The MEF was originally commanded by General Sir Ian Hamilton until he was dismissed due to the failure of the 29th Division at Gallipoli.

Vereker Monteith Hamilton

Vereker
His mother died giving birth to his brother, Vereker.
Col. Christian Monteith Hamilton of the 92nd Highlanders, and brother of British general Sir Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton.

Battle of Ladysmith

LadysmithLombard´s Kopbattle
At the Battle of Ladysmith Hamilton continued to lead his brigade sized column, but played no role in the fighting.
Other senior British officers considered that White was badly advised by over-eager officers such as Penn-Symons or White's Adjutant General, Colonel Ian Hamilton.

Battle of Elandslaagte

Elandslaagtebattle at ElandslaagteElandalaagte
The Second Boer War broke out shortly after their arrival and Hamilton commanded the infantry at the Battle of Elandslaagte.
While three batteries of British field guns bombarded the Boer position, and the 1st Battalion, the Devonshire Regiment advanced frontally in open order, the main attack commanded by Colonel Ian Hamilton (1st Battalion, the Manchester Regiment, 2nd Battalion, the Gordon Highlanders and the dismounted Imperial Light Horse) moved around the Boers' left flank.

Second Boer War

Boer WarAnglo-Boer WarSouth African War
The Second Boer War broke out shortly after their arrival and Hamilton commanded the infantry at the Battle of Elandslaagte.
The British under Major General John French and Colonel Ian Hamilton attacked to clear the line of communications to Dundee.

Military Secretary (United Kingdom)

Military SecretaryDeputy Military SecretaryMilitary Secretary to the Secretary of State for War
In May 1901 Hamilton was appointed Military Secretary at the War Office, but the following November he was again asked to return to South Africa as Chief of Staff to the Commander-in-Chief, Lord Kitchener.
Lieutenant-General Sir Ian Hamilton, 1901–1903

John Vereker, 3rd Viscount Gort

John Prendergast VerekerJohn Vereker3rd Viscount Gort
His mother Corinna was the daughter of the 3rd Viscount Gort.
They had several children including Corinne, the mother of General Ian Hamilton.

Battle of Rooiwal

RoodewalRooiwal
Hamilton travelled 400 miles from Bloemfontein to Pretoria fighting 10 major battles with Boer forces (including the battle of Rooiwal) and fourteen minor ones, and was recommended twice for the Victoria Cross (which was considered inappropriate because of his rank).
On 6 April, Kitchener put Colonel Ian Hamilton in command of another drive to try to trap De La Rey's fighters.

Quartermaster-General to the Forces

Quartermaster-GeneralQuartermaster GeneralChief of Materiel (Land)
From 1903 to 1904 he was Quartermaster-General to the Forces.
1903–1904 General Sir Ian Hamilton

Frederick Roberts, 1st Earl Roberts

Lord RobertsFrederick RobertsRoberts
Hamilton returned to his post as Military Secretary at the War Office in September 1902, and the same month accompanied Lord Roberts, Commander-in-Chief of the Forces, and St John Brodrick, Secretary of State for War, on a visit to Germany to attend the German army maneuvers as guest of the Emperor Wilhelm.
In 1910 Roberts' friend Ian Hamilton, in co-operation with the Secretary of State for War, Richard Haldane, published Compulsory Service in which he attacked Roberts' advocacy of conscription.

Military attachés and observers in the Russo-Japanese War

foreign military observersmilitary attachemilitary attachés from many Western military organizations
* Military attachés and observers in the Russo-Japanese War
In 1904-1905, Sir Ian Hamilton was the military attaché of the Indian Army serving with the Japanese army in Manchuria.

Adjutant-General to the Forces

Adjutant-GeneralAdjutant GeneralAdjutant-General's Department
Hamilton went on to serve as General Officer Commanding Southern Command between 1905 and 1909 and as Adjutant-General to the Forces between 1909 and 1910.
1909 to 1910 Lieutenant-General Sir Ian Hamilton

Ian Hamilton's March

The war correspondent Winston Churchill told of his campaign from Bloemfontein to Pretoria in Ian Hamilton's March (London, 1900, reprinted as the second half of The Boer War), having first met Hamilton in 1897 when they sailed on the same ship.
The book describes General Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton's campaign from Bloemfontein to Pretoria.

Herbert Kitchener, 1st Earl Kitchener

Lord KitchenerKitchenerHerbert Kitchener
In May 1901 Hamilton was appointed Military Secretary at the War Office, but the following November he was again asked to return to South Africa as Chief of Staff to the Commander-in-Chief, Lord Kitchener. In March 1915 Herbert Kitchener appointed Hamilton to command the Allied Mediterranean Expeditionary Force to gain control of the Dardanelles straits from Turkey and to capture Constantinople.
However, Ian Hamilton later wrote of Kitchener "he hated organisations; he smashed organisations ... he was a Master of Expedients".

Russo-Japanese War

war with JapanRussiaRusso-Japanese
From 1904 to 1905, Hamilton was the military attaché of the British Indian Army serving with the Japanese army in Manchuria during the Russo-Japanese War.
In 1904–1905, Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton was the military attaché of the British Indian Army serving with the Imperial Japanese Army in Manchuria.

Southern Command (United Kingdom)

Southern CommandSouth-West DistrictSouthern District
Hamilton went on to serve as General Officer Commanding Southern Command between 1905 and 1909 and as Adjutant-General to the Forces between 1909 and 1910.
1905 - 1909 Lieutenant General Sir Ian Hamilton

Dardanelles

HellespontÇanakkale BoğazıDardanelles Strait
In March 1915 Herbert Kitchener appointed Hamilton to command the Allied Mediterranean Expeditionary Force to gain control of the Dardanelles straits from Turkey and to capture Constantinople.
Sir Ian Hamilton's Mediterranean Expeditionary Force failed in its attempt to capture the Gallipoli peninsula, and its withdrawal was ordered in December 1915, after eight months' fighting.

John de Robeck

Sir John de RobeckDe RobeckJohn M. de Robeck
Churchill ordered Admiral John de Robeck to continue the operation, but de Robeck, replacing the intended commander of the fleet, Admiral Sackville Carden (who had become ill), saw no sense in losing further ships, and withdrew.
On 25 April 1915 the Royal Navy landed General Ian Hamilton's troops at the tip of the Gallipoli peninsula (Cape Helles) and at Anzac Cove, on the peninsula's western coast.

Order of the Crown (Prussia)

Order of the CrownOrder of the Crown of PrussiaPrussian Order of the Crown
Knight 1st class of the Order of the Crown (Prussia) – during his September 1902 visit to Germany to attend German Army maneuvres.
Major-General Sir Ian Hamilton, British Military Secretary - invested 1st class in September 1902 - when he visited Prussia for German Army maneuvers.

General (United Kingdom)

Generalfull GeneralGen.
General Sir Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton, (16 January 1853 – 12 October 1947) was a senior officer in the British Army, who is most notable for commanding the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force during the Gallipoli Campaign.

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
General Sir Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton, (16 January 1853 – 12 October 1947) was a senior officer in the British Army, who is most notable for commanding the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force during the Gallipoli Campaign.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
He spoke English, German, French and Hindi, was considered charming, courtly and kind.

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
He spoke English, German, French and Hindi, was considered charming, courtly and kind.