Ice

water iceicyglacier iceice crystalsIce Xicingice plantice IVLake icephases of ice
Ice is water frozen into a solid state.wikipedia
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Water

H 2 OHOliquid water
Ice is water frozen into a solid state.
Clouds are formed from suspended droplets of water and ice, its solid state.

Solid

solidsssolid state
Ice is water frozen into a solid state.
The atoms in a solid are tightly bound to each other, either in a regular geometric lattice (crystalline solids, which include metals and ordinary ice) or irregularly (an amorphous solid such as common window glass), and are typically low in energy.

Earth

Earth's surfaceterrestrialworld
It is abundant on Earth's surface – particularly in the polar regions and above the snow line – and, as a common form of precipitation and deposition, plays a key role in Earth's water cycle and climate.
The majority of Earth's polar regions are covered in ice, including the Antarctic ice sheet and the sea ice of the Arctic ice pack.

Ice spike

It falls as snowflakes and hail or occurs as frost, icicles or ice spikes.
An ice spike is an ice formation, often in the shape of an inverted icicle, that projects upwards from the surface of a body of frozen water.

Water cycle

hydrological cyclewaterhydrologic cycle
It is abundant on Earth's surface – particularly in the polar regions and above the snow line – and, as a common form of precipitation and deposition, plays a key role in Earth's water cycle and climate.
In doing so, the water goes through different forms: liquid, solid (ice) and vapor.

Polar ice cap

polar ice capspolar icepolar cap
It is abundant on Earth's surface – particularly in the polar regions and above the snow line – and, as a common form of precipitation and deposition, plays a key role in Earth's water cycle and climate.
A polar ice cap or polar cap is a high-latitude region of a planet, dwarf planet, or natural satellite that is covered in ice.

Ice Ih

ice I h Ice Ihexagonal ice
Virtually all the ice on Earth's surface and in its atmosphere is of a hexagonal crystalline structure denoted as ice I h (spoken as "ice one h") with minute traces of cubic ice denoted as ice I c.
Ice I h (pronounced: ice one h, also known as ice-phase-one) is the hexagonal crystal form of ordinary ice, or frozen water.

Ice sculpture

ice carvingiceice sculpting
Ice is used in a variety of ways, including cooling, winter sports and ice sculpture.
Ice sculpture is a form of sculpture that uses ice as the raw material.

Frost heaving

frost heavefrost heavesfrost creep
The effect of expansion during freezing can be dramatic, and ice expansion is a basic cause of freeze-thaw weathering of rock in nature and damage to building foundations and roadways from frost heaving.
Frost heaving (or a frost heave) is an upwards swelling of soil during freezing conditions caused by an increasing presence of ice as it grows towards the surface, upwards from the depth in the soil where freezing temperatures have penetrated into the soil (the freezing front or freezing boundary).

Sympagic ecology

sympagicsympagic organisms
When sea water freezes, the ice is riddled with brine-filled channels which sustain sympagic organisms such as bacteria, algae, copepods and annelids, which in turn provide food for animals such as krill and specialised fish like the bald notothen, fed upon in turn by larger animals such as emperor penguins and minke whales.
A sympagic environment is one where water exists mostly as a solid, ice, such as a polar ice cap or glacier.

Ice sheet

ice sheetscontinental glacierice-sheet
Sufficiently thin ice sheets allow light to pass through while protecting the underside from short-term weather extremes such as wind chill.
An ice sheet, also known as a continental glacier, is a mass of glacial ice that covers surrounding terrain and is greater than 50000 km2.

Crystal

crystallinecrystalscrystalline solid
It possesses a regular crystalline structure based on the molecule of water, which consists of a single oxygen atom covalently bonded to two hydrogen atoms, or H–O–H.
The word crystal derives from the Ancient Greek word κρύσταλλος, meaning both "ice" and "rock crystal", from κρύος, "icy cold, frost".

Glacier

glaciersglacialglaciated
The melting of ice under high pressures is thought to contribute to the movement of glaciers.
A glacier ( or ) is a persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight.

Iceberg

icebergstabular iceberggrowler
For instance, icebergs containing impurities (e.g., sediments, algae, air bubbles) can appear brown, grey or green.
An iceberg is a large piece of freshwater ice that has broken off a glacier or an ice shelf and is floating freely in open (salt) water.

Properties of water

waterH 2 Owater molecule
Ice may be any one of the 18 known solid crystalline phases of water, or in an amorphous solid state at various densities.
It is the most abundant substance on Earth and the only common substance to exist as a solid, liquid, and gas on Earth's surface.

Water vapor

water vapourvaporevaporation
It may also be deposited directly by water vapor, as happens in the formation of frost.
Water vapor can be produced from the evaporation or boiling of liquid water or from the sublimation of ice.

Frost weathering

freeze-thawfrost actionhydrofracturing
The effect of expansion during freezing can be dramatic, and ice expansion is a basic cause of freeze-thaw weathering of rock in nature and damage to building foundations and roadways from frost heaving.
Frost weathering is a collective term for several mechanical weathering processes induced by stresses created by the freezing of water into ice.

Ice Ic

Ice I c Cubic iceI c
Virtually all the ice on Earth's surface and in its atmosphere is of a hexagonal crystalline structure denoted as ice I h (spoken as "ice one h") with minute traces of cubic ice denoted as ice I c.
Ice I c (pronounced "ice one c" or "ice icy") is a metastable cubic crystalline variant of ice.

Mercury (planet)

MercuryMercurioplanet Mercury
In the Solar System, ice is abundant and occurs naturally from as close to the Sun as Mercury to as far away as the Oort cloud objects.
On November 29, 2012, NASA confirmed that images from MESSENGER had detected that craters at the north pole contained water ice.

Ice XI

XI
Ices XI, XIII, and XIV are hydrogen-ordered forms of ices I h, V, and XII respectively.
Ice XI is the hydrogen-ordered form of I h, the ordinary form of ice.

Oort cloud

Oort cloud objectÖpik-Oort CloudÖpik–Oort cloud
In the Solar System, ice is abundant and occurs naturally from as close to the Sun as Mercury to as far away as the Oort cloud objects.
If analyses of comets are representative of the whole, the vast majority of Oort-cloud objects consist of ices such as water, methane, ethane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide.

Amorphous ice

vitreous iceamorphousHigh density amorphous ice
When water is cooled rapidly (quenching), up to three different types of amorphous ice can form depending on the history of its pressure and temperature.
Common ice is a crystalline material where the molecules are regularly arranged in a hexagonal lattice whereas amorphous ice is distinguished by a lack of long-range order in its molecular arrangement.

Ice VI

VI
Ice VI is a form of ice that exists at high pressure at the order of about 1 GPa (= 10 000 bar) and temperatures ranging from 130 up to 355 Kelvin (−143°C up to 82°C); see also the phase diagram of water.

Ice II

II
Ice II is a rhombohedral crystalline form of ice with a highly ordered structure.

Ice VII

ice-VIItype VII iceVII
Ice VII is a cubic crystalline form of ice.