Iceberg

An iceberg in the Arctic Ocean
Northern edge of Iceberg B-15A in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, 29 January 2001
Grotto in an iceberg, photographed during the British Antarctic Expedition of 1911–1913, 5 Jan 1911
Different shapes of icebergs
Tabular iceberg, near Brown Bluff in the Antarctic Sound off Tabarin Peninsula
Non-tabular iceberg off Elephant Island in the Southern Ocean
One of the icebergs suspected of sinking the RMS Titanic; a smudge of red paint much like the Titanic red hull stripe was seen near its base at the waterline.
An iceberg being pushed by three U.S. Navy ships in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica
Iceberg A22A in the South Atlantic Ocean
Icebergs in Disko Bay
The calving of Iceberg A-38 off Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf
Iceberg pictured in the coat of arms of Ilulissat

Piece of freshwater ice more than 15 m long that has broken off a glacier or an ice shelf and is floating freely in open water.

- Iceberg
An iceberg in the Arctic Ocean

430 related topics

Relevance

patch International Ice Patrol

International Ice Patrol

patch International Ice Patrol

The International Ice Patrol is an organization with the purpose of monitoring the presence of icebergs in the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans and reporting their movements for safety purposes.

A mass of ice calves from the Perito Moreno glacier in Lago Argentino

Ice calving

Breaking of ice chunks from the edge of a glacier.

Breaking of ice chunks from the edge of a glacier.

A mass of ice calves from the Perito Moreno glacier in Lago Argentino
A calving glacier and the resulting ice field.
Landsat image of Jakobshavn Isbræ. The lines show the position of the calving front of the Jakobshavn Isbræ since 1851. The date of this image is 2001 and the calving front of the glacier can be seen at the 2001 line. The area stretching from the calving front to the sea (towards the bottom left corner) is the Ilulissat icefjord. Courtesy of NASA Space Observatory
Glacier Bay, glacier calving

It is the sudden release and breaking away of a mass of ice from a glacier, iceberg, ice front, ice shelf, or crevasse.

Broken pieces of Arctic sea ice with a snow cover.

Sea ice

Sea ice arises as seawater freezes.

Sea ice arises as seawater freezes.

Broken pieces of Arctic sea ice with a snow cover.
Hypothetical sea ice dynamics scenario showing some of the most common sea ice features.
Nilas in Baffin Bay
Distinction between 1st year sea ice (FY), 2nd year (SY), multiyear (MY) and old ice.
Satellite image of sea ice forming near St. Matthew Island in the Bering Sea.
Seasonal variation and annual decrease of Arctic sea ice volume as estimated by measurement backed numerical modelling.
Volume of arctic sea ice over time using a polar coordinate system draw method (time goes counter clockwise; one cycle per year)
As ice melts, the liquid water collects in depressions on the surface and deepens them, forming these melt ponds in the Arctic. These fresh water ponds are separated from the salty sea below and around it, until breaks in the ice merge the two.
Rare phenomenon – the formation of ball ice. Stroomi Beach, Tallinn, Estonia.
Aerial view showing an expanse of drift ice offshore Labrador (Eastern Canada) displaying floes of various sizes loosely packed, with open water in several networks of leads. (Scale not available.)
Aerial view showing an expanse of drift ice in southeastern Greenland, comprising loosely packed floes of various sizes, with a lead developing in the centre.(Scale not available.)
Aerial view showing an expanse of drift ice consisting mostly of water. (Scale not available.)
Close-up view inside a drift ice zone: several small rounded floes are separated from each other by slush or grease ice. (Bird at lower right for scale.)
Example of hummocky ice: an accumulation of ice blocks, here about {{convert|20|to|30|cm|abbr=on}} in thickness (with a thin snow cover).
Field example of a pressure ridge. Only the sail (the part of the ridge above the ice surface) is shown in this photograph – the keel is more difficult to document.
Aerial view of the Chukchi Sea between Chukotka and Alaska, displaying a pattern of leads. Much of the open water inside those leads is already covered by new ice (indicated by a slightly lighter blue color)(scale not available).
Change in extent of the Arctic Sea ice between April and August, in 2013.
Sea ice off Baffin Island.
Sea ice imitates the shoreline along the Kamchatka Peninsula.
Clear view of the Antarctic Peninsula, the Larsen Ice Shelf and the sea ice-covered waters around the region.

Sea ice may be contrasted with icebergs, which are chunks of ice shelves or glaciers that calve into the ocean.

Ross Ice Shelf situated between Marie Byrd Land and Victoria Land

Ross Ice Shelf

Largest ice shelf of Antarctica .

Largest ice shelf of Antarctica .

Ross Ice Shelf situated between Marie Byrd Land and Victoria Land
Crevasse, Ross Ice Shelf in 2001
"The mystic Barrier" at Bay of Whales, near where Amundsen first encountered it. Note humans for size comparison (dark spots next to the large chunk of sea ice at left image border). RV Nathaniel B. Palmer is in the distance.
Ross Ice Shelf edge in 1997
Glacier-ice shelf interactions
Main drill site for the New Zealand 2017 hot water drill camp on the Ross Ice Shelf

Iceberg B-15, the world's largest recorded iceberg, was calved from the Ross Ice Shelf during March 2000.

Ice

Water frozen into a solid state, typically forming at or below temperatures of 0 degrees Celsius or 32 degrees Fahrenheit.

Water frozen into a solid state, typically forming at or below temperatures of 0 degrees Celsius or 32 degrees Fahrenheit.

The three-dimensional crystal structure of H2O ice Ih (c) is composed of bases of H2O ice molecules (b) located on lattice points within the two-dimensional hexagonal space lattice (a).
Pressure dependence of ice melting
Log-lin pressure-temperature phase diagram of water. The Roman numerals correspond to some ice phases listed below.
An alternative formulation of the phase diagram for certain ices and other phases of water
Frozen waterfall in southeast New York
Feather ice on the plateau near Alta, Norway. The crystals form at temperatures below −30 °C (−22 °F).
Ice on deciduous tree after freezing rain
A small frozen rivulet
Ice formation on exterior of vehicle windshield
An accumulation of ice pellets
A large hailstone, about 6 cm in diameter
Snowflakes by Wilson Bentley, 1902.
Harvesting ice on Lake St. Clair in Michigan, c. 1905
Layout of a late 19th-Century ice factory
Loss of control on ice by an articulated bus
Channel through ice for ship traffic on Lake Huron with ice breakers in background
Rime ice on the leading edge of an aircraft wing, partially released by the black pneumatic boot.
Skating fun by 17th century Dutch painter Hendrick Avercamp
Ice pier during 1983 cargo operations. McMurdo Station, Antarctica

For instance, icebergs containing impurities (e.g., sediments, algae, air bubbles) can appear brown, grey or green.

The glacier of the Geikie Plateau in Greenland.

Glacier

Persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight.

Persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight.

The glacier of the Geikie Plateau in Greenland.
With 7,253 known glaciers, Pakistan contains more glacial ice than any other country on earth outside the polar regions. At 62 km in length, its Baltoro Glacier is one of the world's longest alpine glaciers.
Aerial view of a glacier in Chugach State Park, Alaska, United States
Webber Glacier on Grant Land (northern Ellesmere Island) is an advancing polar glacier and frozen to the glacier bed. Debris rich layers of the ground moraine are sheared and folded into the ice. The steep icefront shows waterfalls. The glacier front is 6 km broad and up to 40 m high (July 20, 1978)
Shear or herring-bone crevasses on Emmons Glacier (Mount Rainier); such crevasses often form near the edge of a glacier where interactions with underlying or marginal rock impede flow. In this case, the impediment appears to be some distance from the near margin of the glacier.
Forbes bands on the Mer de Glace glacier in France
Black ice glacier near Aconcagua, Argentina
Fox Glacier in New Zealand finishes near a rainforest.
Diagram of glacial plucking and abrasion
Glacially plucked granitic bedrock near Mariehamn, Åland
Glacial moraines above Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada
A drumlin field forms after a glacier has modified the landscape. The teardrop-shaped formations denote the direction of the ice flow.
Features of a glacial landscape
Landscape produced by a receding glacier
South Cascade Glacier in Washington documented from 1928 to 2003 showing the recent rapid glacier retreating. By looking at this photo it's clear to see how quickly the glaciers are retreating in the modern world. This kind of retreating is the result of climate change which has significantly increased due to human impacts. This photo was taken from USGS U.S. Department of Interior research looking at the last 50 years of glacier change.
Isostatic pressure by a glacier on the Earth's crust
Northern polar ice cap on Mars.
Ice calving from the terminus of the Perito Moreno Glacier in western Patagonia, Argentina.
The Aletsch Glacier, the largest glacier of the Alps, in Switzerland.
The Quelccaya Ice Cap is the second-largest glaciated area in the tropics, in Peru.
Mouth of the Schlatenkees Glacier near Innergschlöß, Austria.
The Grotta del Gelo is a cave of Etna volcano, the southernmost glacier in Europe.
Sightseeing boat in front of a tidewater glacier, Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska.
Gorner Glacier in Switzerland.
An aerial photograph of the Gorner Glacier (left side of image) together with the Grenzgletscher (r.) flowing into it, both framing the Monte Rosa massif in the middle
A packrafter passes a wall of freshly exposed blue ice on Spencer Glacier, in Alaska. Glacial ice acts like a filter on light, and the more time light spends traveling through the ice, the bluer it becomes.
A glacier cave located on the Perito Moreno Glacier in Argentina.
Ice cracks in the Titlis Glacier.
Crossing a crevasse on the Easton Glacier, Mount Baker, in the North Cascades, United States.
An exposed glacier tube that once transported water down the interior of the glacier.
Romer Lake's Elephant Foot Glacier in the Earth's Arctic, as seen by Landsat 8. This picture shows several glaciers that have the same shape as many features on Mars that are believed to also be glaciers.  The next three images from Mars show shapes similar to the Elephant Foot Glacier.
Mesa in Ismenius Lacus quadrangle, as seen by CTX. Mesa has several glaciers eroding it. One of the glaciers is seen in greater detail in the next two images from HiRISE. Image from Ismenius Lacus quadrangle.
Glacier as seen by HiRISE under the HiWish program. Area in the rectangle is enlarged in the next photo. Zone of accumulation of snow at the top. Glacier is moving down valley, then spreading out on plain. Evidence for flow comes from the many lines on surface. Location is in Protonilus Mensae in Ismenius Lacus quadrangle.
Enlargement of area in rectangle of the previous image. On Earth, the ridge would be called the terminal moraine of an alpine glacier. Picture taken with HiRISE under the HiWish program. Image from Ismenius Lacus quadrangle.

As the ice reaches the sea, pieces break off or calve, forming icebergs.

Starboard view of Titanic

Titanic

Starboard view of Titanic
RMS Olympic's rudder with central and port wing propellers; for scale note the man at the bottom of the photo.
La Circassienne au Bain by Merry-Joseph Blondel; the most highly valued item of cargo lost on the Titanic. This image is of a copy
A collapsible lifeboat with canvas sides
Titanic leaving Belfast for her sea trials on 2 April 1912
Edward Smith, captain of Titanic, in 1911
John Jacob Astor IV in 1909. He was the wealthiest person aboard Titanic; he did not survive.
The route of Titanics maiden voyage, with the coordinates of her sinking
Senate Inquiry: Within five days of the sinking, The New York Times published several columns relating to Ismay's conduct—concerning which "there has been so much comment". Columns included the statement of attorney Karl H. Behr indicating Ismay had helped supervise loading of passengers in lifeboats, and of William E. Carter stating that he and Ismay boarded a lifeboat only after there were no more women.
The, which had tried to warn Titanic of the danger from pack-ice
Markers of Titanic victims, Fairview Cemetery, Halifax, Nova Scotia
The bow of the wrecked Titanic, photographed in June 2004
200px
An ice patrol aircraft inspecting an iceberg
251x251px
1100px
A cutaway diagram of Titanics midship section
Size comparison
The 1st-Class Lounge of the Olympic, which was almost identical to that of the Titanic, seen today as a dining room in the White Swan Hotel, Alnwick
The Forward First Class Grand Staircase of Titanic{{-'}}s sister ship RMS Olympic. Titanic{{-'}}s staircase would have looked nearly identical. No known photos of Titanic{{-'}}s staircase exist.
The gymnasium on the Boat Deck, which was equipped with the latest exercise machines
The Á La Carte restaurant on B Deck, run as a concession by Italian-born chef Gaspare Gatti
The 1st-Class Lounge of the RMS Olympic, Titanic{{-'}}s sister ship
The 1st-Class Turkish Baths, located along the Starboard side of F-Deck

RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner, operated by the White Star Line, which sank in the North Atlantic Ocean on 15 April 1912 after striking an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton, UK, to New York City.

"Untergang der Titanic" by Willy Stöwer, 1912

Sinking of the Titanic

The sank in the early morning hours of 15 April 1912 in the North Atlantic Ocean, four days into her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City.

The sank in the early morning hours of 15 April 1912 in the North Atlantic Ocean, four days into her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City.

"Untergang der Titanic" by Willy Stöwer, 1912
Titanic on sea trials, 2 April 1912
SS New York in her near collision with Titanic
Route of Titanic maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City, the point where she sank marked in yellow
The iceberg thought to have been hit by Titanic, photographed the morning of 15 April 1912 by 's chief steward. The iceberg was reported to have a streak of red paint from a ship's hull along its waterline on one side.
Titanics course during her attempted "port around"
Drawing of the iceberg collision.
The iceberg buckled the plates, popped rivets and damaged a sequence of compartments. (Side view.)
Bulkhead arrangement with damaged areas shown in green
Titanic sank in two and a half hours.
Captain Edward Smith in 1911
Lifeboat 6 under capacity
The Sad Parting, illustration of 1912
Distress signal sent at about 01:40 by Titanics radio operator, Jack Phillips, to the Russian American Line ship SS Birma. This was one of Titanics last intelligible radio messages.
Lifeboat No. 15 was nearly lowered onto lifeboat No. 13 (depicted by Charles Dixon).
Sinking of the Titanic by Henry Reuterdahl
Nearer, My God, To Thee – cartoon of 1912
Illustration of the sinking of the Titanic
Imagined view of Titanic final plunge
Simplistic visualization of the top-down and Mengot break-up models
Pocket watch retrieved from the wreck site, stopped showing a time of 2:28
Colonel Archibald Gracie, one of the survivors who made it to collapsible lifeboat B. He never recovered from his ordeal and died eight months after the sinking.
Collapsible lifeboat D photographed from the deck of Carpathia on the morning of 15 April 1912.
Arrival of the "ship of sorrow" at New York by L.F. Grant, 1912
London paperboy Ned Parfett outside the White Star Line offices
Time to get busy by Fisher, 1912. Public outrage at the disaster led politicians to impose new regulations on the shipping industry.
Wreck of the Titanic, June 2004
Treemap showing numbers of passengers and crew by class, and whether men, women or children, and whether saved or lost
Preparations for the arrival of deceased victims in Halifax

The largest ocean liner in service at the time, Titanic had an estimated 2,224 people on board when she struck an iceberg at around 23:40 (ship's time) on Sunday, 14 April 1912.

The calving of A-38 off Ronne ice shelf.

Filchner–Ronne Ice Shelf

Antarctic ice shelf bordering the Weddell Sea.

Antarctic ice shelf bordering the Weddell Sea.

The calving of A-38 off Ronne ice shelf.
The A38-B iceberg splits.
Location.
Rapid sea ice breakup along the Ronne-Filchner ice shelf, January 2010
Some named Antarctic iceshelves.

From time to time, when the shearing stresses exceed the strength of the ice, cracks form and large parts of the ice sheet separate from the ice shelf and float off and disperse as icebergs.

Visualisation of the distribution (by volume) of water on Earth. Each tiny cube (such as the one representing biological water) corresponds to approximately 1400 cubic km of water, with a mass of approximately 1.4 trillion tonnes (235000 times that of the Great Pyramid of Giza or 8 times that of Lake Kariba, arguably the heaviest man-made object). The entire block comprises 1 million tiny cubes.

Fresh water

Any naturally occurring liquid or frozen water containing low concentrations of dissolved salts and other total dissolved solids.

Any naturally occurring liquid or frozen water containing low concentrations of dissolved salts and other total dissolved solids.

Visualisation of the distribution (by volume) of water on Earth. Each tiny cube (such as the one representing biological water) corresponds to approximately 1400 cubic km of water, with a mass of approximately 1.4 trillion tonnes (235000 times that of the Great Pyramid of Giza or 8 times that of Lake Kariba, arguably the heaviest man-made object). The entire block comprises 1 million tiny cubes.
A graphical distribution of the locations of water on Earth. Only 3% of the Earth's water is fresh water. Most of it is in icecaps and glaciers (69%) and groundwater (30%), while all lakes, rivers and swamps combined only account for a small fraction (0.3%) of the Earth's total freshwater reserves.

Fresh water may encompass frozen and meltwater in ice sheets, ice caps, glaciers, snowfields and icebergs, natural precipitations such as rainfall, snowfall, hail/sleet and graupel, and surface runoffs that form inland bodies of water such as wetlands, ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, as well as groundwater contained in aquifers, subterranean rivers and lakes.