Icelanders

IcelandicIcelanderIcelandIcelandic peopleIcelandic descentIceland-bornIcelandic Icelandic ancestryIcelandic nationalIcelandic women
Icelanders (Íslendingar) are a North Germanic ethnic group and nation who are native to the island country of Iceland and speak Icelandic.wikipedia
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North Germanic peoples

North GermanicScandinaviansNorse
Icelanders (Íslendingar) are a North Germanic ethnic group and nation who are native to the island country of Iceland and speak Icelandic.
Modern North Germanic ethnic groups are the Danes, Icelanders, Norwegians, Swedes, and Faroese. "[T]he pages of history have been filled with accounts of various Germanic peoples that made excursions in search of better homes; the Goths went into the Danube valley and thence into Italy and southern France ; and thence into Italy and southern France; the Franks seized what was later called France; the Vandals went down into Spain, and via Africa they "vandalized" Rome; the Angles, part of the Saxons, and the Jutes moved over into England; and the Burgundians and the Lombards worked south into France and Italy. Probably very early during these centuries of migration the three outstanding groups of the Germanic peoples — the North Germanic people of Scandinavia, the East Germanic branch, comprising the Goths chiefly, and the West Germanic group, comprising the remaining Germanic tribes — developed their notable group traits.

Western Norway

VestlandetWesternWest Coast
Historical and DNA records indicate that around 60 to 80 percent of the male settlers were of Norse origin (primarily from Western Norway) and a similar percentage of the women were of Gaelic stock from Ireland and peripheral Scotland.
The Icelandic and Faroese people, and many people in the British Isles, are descendants of Norsemen and Vikings who emigrated from Western Norway during the Viking Age.

Norsemen

NorseNorsemanNorthmen
Historical and DNA records indicate that around 60 to 80 percent of the male settlers were of Norse origin (primarily from Western Norway) and a similar percentage of the women were of Gaelic stock from Ireland and peripheral Scotland.
Though lacking a common ethnonym, the Viking Age Norsemen still had a common identity, which survives among their modern descendants, the Danes, Icelanders, Faroe Islanders, Norwegians and Swedes, who are now generally referred to as "Scandinavians" rather than Norsemen.

Denmark–Norway

Denmark-NorwayKingdom of Denmark–NorwayKingdom of Denmark and Norway
Development of the island was slow due to a lack of interest from the countries controlling it for most of its history: Norway, Denmark–Norway, and ultimately Denmark.
The state's inhabitants were mainly Danes, Norwegians, and Germans, and also included Faroese, Icelanders and Inuit in the Norwegian overseas possessions, a Sami minority in northern Norway, as well as indigenous peoples and enslaved Africans in the colonies.

Irish people

IrishIrishmanIrish descent
These people were primarily of Norwegian, Irish or Gaelic Scottish origin.
Many Icelanders have Irish and Scottish Gaelic forebears.

Gaels

GaelicGaelGaelic culture
Historical and DNA records indicate that around 60 to 80 percent of the male settlers were of Norse origin (primarily from Western Norway) and a similar percentage of the women were of Gaelic stock from Ireland and peripheral Scotland.
With the coming of the Viking Age and their slave markets, Irish were also dispersed in this way across the realms under Viking control; as a legacy, in genetic studies, Icelanders exhibit high levels of Gaelic-derived mDNA.

Scandinavia

Scandinavian countriesScandinavianNordic
This evidence shows that the founder population of Iceland came from Ireland, Scotland, and Scandinavia: studies of mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomes indicate that 62% of Icelanders' matrilineal ancestry derives from Scotland and Ireland (with most of the rest being from Scandinavia), while 75% of their patrilineal ancestry derives from Scandinavia (with most of the rest being from the Irish and British Isles).
Icelanders and the Faroese are to a significant extent descended from the Norse and are therefore often seen as Scandinavian.

Greenland

Kalaallit NunaatGreenlandicGL
The first Europeans to emigrate to and settle in Greenland were Icelanders who did so under the leadership of Erik the Red in the late 10th century CE and numbered around 500 people.
From 986, Greenland's west coast was settled by Icelanders and Norwegians, through a contingent of 14 boats led by Erik the Red.

Gimli, Manitoba

GimliGimli, MBGimli, Rural Municipality of
Gimli, in Manitoba, Canada, is home to the largest population of Icelanders outside of the main island of Iceland.
The community's first European settlers were Icelanders who were part of the New Iceland settlement in Manitoba.

Icelandic language

IcelandicModern IcelandicIceland
Icelanders (Íslendingar) are a North Germanic ethnic group and nation who are native to the island country of Iceland and speak Icelandic. The language spoken is Icelandic, a North Germanic language, and Lutheranism is the predominant religion.

Vikings

VikingNorseDanes
They traveled 1,000 km (600 mi) in their Viking longships to the island of Iceland.
Early transmission of this information was primarily oral, and later texts were reliant upon the writings and transcriptions of Christian scholars, including the Icelanders Snorri Sturluson and Sæmundur fróði.

Manitoba

MBManitoba, CanadaProvince of Manitoba
Gimli, in Manitoba, Canada, is home to the largest population of Icelanders outside of the main island of Iceland.
Gimli, Manitoba is home to the largest Icelandic community outside of Iceland.

Reformation

Protestant Reformationthe ReformationProtestant
While Catholicism was supplanted by Protestantism during the Reformation, most other world religions are now represented on the island: there are small Protestant Free Churches and Catholic communities, and even a nascent Muslim community, composed of both immigrants and local converts.
Through German trade connections, many young Icelanders studied in Hamburg.

Spanish Fork, Utah

Spanish ForkSpanish Fork, UTSpanish Fork, Utah Territory
A more recent instance of Icelandic emigration to North America occurred in 1855, when a small group settled in Spanish Fork, Utah.
In Utah Valley's historical settlement by immigrants, Scandinavians (most notably Icelanders); as well as Swiss people; Spanish Americans, Hispanics or Latinos; English Americans, Irish Americans and Scottish Americans are prevalent ethnocultural groups in Spanish Fork, and the nearby towns of Salem and Payson.

Religion in Iceland

IcelandChristianity in Icelanddetails
Before that, between the 9th and 10th century, the prevailing religion among the early Icelanders (mostly Norwegian settlers fleeing Harald Fairhair's monarchical centralisation in 872–930) was the northern Germanic religion, which persisted for centuries even after the official Christianisation of the state.

Germanic peoples

GermanicGermanic tribesGermanic tribe
The Viking Age Norse people split into an Old East Norse and an Old West Norse group, which further separated into Icelanders, Faroese and Norwegians on one hand and Swedes and Danes on the other.

Ethnic group

ethnicityethnicethnic groups
Icelanders (Íslendingar) are a North Germanic ethnic group and nation who are native to the island country of Iceland and speak Icelandic.

Nation

nationsnationalnationhood
Icelanders (Íslendingar) are a North Germanic ethnic group and nation who are native to the island country of Iceland and speak Icelandic.

Island country

island nationisland countriesisland state
Icelanders (Íslendingar) are a North Germanic ethnic group and nation who are native to the island country of Iceland and speak Icelandic.

Iceland

IcelandicISLRepublic of Iceland
Icelanders (Íslendingar) are a North Germanic ethnic group and nation who are native to the island country of Iceland and speak Icelandic.

North Germanic languages

ScandinavianScandinavian languagesNorth Germanic
The language spoken is Icelandic, a North Germanic language, and Lutheranism is the predominant religion.

Lutheranism

LutheranEvangelical LutheranLutherans
The language spoken is Icelandic, a North Germanic language, and Lutheranism is the predominant religion.

Settlement of Iceland

Icelandsettlementsea
Historical and DNA records indicate that around 60 to 80 percent of the male settlers were of Norse origin (primarily from Western Norway) and a similar percentage of the women were of Gaelic stock from Ireland and peripheral Scotland.