Ida Henrietta Hyde

Ida Hyde
Ida Henrietta Hyde (September 8, 1857 – August 22, 1945) was an American physiologist known for developing a micro-electrode powerful enough to stimulate tissue chemically or electronically, yet small enough to inject or remove tissue from a cell.wikipedia
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Physiology

physiologistphysiologicalphysiologically
Ida Henrietta Hyde (September 8, 1857 – August 22, 1945) was an American physiologist known for developing a micro-electrode powerful enough to stimulate tissue chemically or electronically, yet small enough to inject or remove tissue from a cell.
In 1902, the American Physiological Society elected Ida Hyde as the first female member of the society.

Wilhelm Kühne

Wilhelm KuhneKühne, Wilhelm (Willy) FriedrichWilly Kuhne
The main problem in obtaining her degree was that her teaching professor, Wilhelm Kühne, disliked the thought of allowing a woman to work under him.
Ida Henrietta Hyde (1857–1945) wanted to study physiology under Kühne at the University of Heidelberg on the recommendation of Professor Alexander Goette at Strasbourg.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
Ida Henrietta Hyde (September 8, 1857 – August 22, 1945) was an American physiologist known for developing a micro-electrode powerful enough to stimulate tissue chemically or electronically, yet small enough to inject or remove tissue from a cell. The surname Hyde was taken after their arrival in the United States.

Electrode

electrodescathodemicroelectrode
Ida Henrietta Hyde (September 8, 1857 – August 22, 1945) was an American physiologist known for developing a micro-electrode powerful enough to stimulate tissue chemically or electronically, yet small enough to inject or remove tissue from a cell.

Davenport, Iowa

DavenportDavenport, IADavenport High School
Born in Davenport, Iowa, Ida was one of four children to Meyer and Babette (Lowenthal) Heidenheimer, German immigrants from Württemberg.

Iowa

IAState of IowaNorthern Iowa
Born in Davenport, Iowa, Ida was one of four children to Meyer and Babette (Lowenthal) Heidenheimer, German immigrants from Württemberg.

Germans

Germanethnic Germanethnic Germans
Born in Davenport, Iowa, Ida was one of four children to Meyer and Babette (Lowenthal) Heidenheimer, German immigrants from Württemberg.

Immigration

immigrantimmigrantsimmigrated
Born in Davenport, Iowa, Ida was one of four children to Meyer and Babette (Lowenthal) Heidenheimer, German immigrants from Württemberg.

Württemberg

WurttembergWurtembergWurttemberg, Germany
Born in Davenport, Iowa, Ida was one of four children to Meyer and Babette (Lowenthal) Heidenheimer, German immigrants from Württemberg.

Surname

family nameoccupational surnamelast name
The surname Hyde was taken after their arrival in the United States.

Chicago

Chicago, IllinoisChicago, ILCity of Chicago
In order to keep the family afloat, they moved to Chicago, where Babette took in jobs of cleaning and mending until she was able to start a prosperous business.

Great Chicago Fire

Chicago FireGreat Chicago Fire of 18711871 Great Chicago Fire
In 1871, the family home was destroyed in the Great Fire of Chicago, which destroyed the family business as well.

Hatmaking

millinermillineryhatter
Without any form of income, Ida as the oldest daughter, entered the work force at age 14 as a milliner's apprentice.

Apprenticeship

apprenticeapprenticedapprenticeships
Without any form of income, Ida as the oldest daughter, entered the work force at age 14 as a milliner's apprentice.

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignIllinois
She brought in a large portion of the family income, and even paid for her only brother's education at the University of Illinois.

Alexander von Humboldt

HumboldtHumb.Alexander Humboldt
At the store where she worked, Hyde chanced upon an English version of Ansichten der Natur (View of Nature) by Alexander von Humboldt.

Chicago Athenaeum

Chicago Athenaeum: Museum of Architecture and DesignChicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design
In addition, it spurred her toward continuing her education, which she did by attending night classes at the Chicago Athenaeum during 1875–76 in spite of her parent's objections.

Academy

academicacademiaacademics
Her further educational studies came to her while she was visiting her brother at his university and chanced upon meeting several women working in academia.

College-preparatory school

college preparatorypreparatory schoolcollege preparatory school
She was able to pass her entrance exams for the College Preparatory School and later entered the same university as her brother.

Teacher

educatorschoolteacherschool teacher
However, she passed the county teacher's exam and, three years later, the Chicago teacher's exams, and for the next seven years she worked as a teacher of second- and third-graders within the Chicago public school system.

Chicago Public Schools

Chicago Board of EducationChicago Public SchoolChicago public school system
However, she passed the county teacher's exam and, three years later, the Chicago teacher's exams, and for the next seven years she worked as a teacher of second- and third-graders within the Chicago public school system.

Primary education

primaryelementary educationelementary
Her biological pursuits were still expressed in her attempts to work nature studies into the public school system.

Cornell University

CornellCornell University PressUniversity of Cornell
She enrolled at Cornell University and earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in just three years.

Bachelor of Arts

B.A.BAA.B.
She enrolled at Cornell University and earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in just three years.

Bryn Mawr College

Bryn MawrBryn Mawr College LibraryBryn Mawr Alumnae Association
She was then offered a biology scholarship at Bryn Mawr College.