Capricorn headquarters, Macon, 2009
The album's title came from a nickname of a rented cabin the band shared, the "Idlewild South"
The gatefold album sleeve features the band posing nude in a brook.

Following the release of their 1969 debut, the Allman Brothers Band toured the United States extensively to promote the album, which had little commercial success.

- Idlewild South

The Allman Brothers Band were not an instant success, selling just 33,000 copies of their debut album, which stalled at #188.

- Phil Walden

However, the breakthrough of 1970's Idlewild South (which peaked at #38) and the 1971 live double set At Fillmore East (which peaked at #13 and ultimately attained a RIAA platinum certification) convinced Walden to end Capricorn's affiliation with Atlantic and move to Warner Bros. Records.

- Phil Walden

Following the band's increased fame in the early 1970s, this album and its follow-up, Idlewild South (1970), were repackaged into the compilation album Beginnings.

- The Allman Brothers Band (album)

Executives suggested to the band's manager and Capricorn president, Phil Walden, that he relocate the band to New York or Los Angeles to increase their exposure.

- Idlewild South

Meanwhile, Phil Walden, the manager of the late Otis Redding and several other R&B acts, was looking to expand into rock acts.

- The Allman Brothers Band (album)

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The Allman Brothers Band, March 1971. From left to right: Dickey Betts, Duane Allman, Gregg Allman, Jaimoe Johanson, Berry Oakley, Butch Trucks.

The Allman Brothers Band

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American rock band formed in Jacksonville, Florida in 1969 by brothers Duane Allman and Gregg Allman (vocals, keyboards, songwriting), as well as Dickey Betts (lead guitar, vocals, songwriting), Berry Oakley (bass guitar), Butch Trucks (drums), and Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson (drums).

American rock band formed in Jacksonville, Florida in 1969 by brothers Duane Allman and Gregg Allman (vocals, keyboards, songwriting), as well as Dickey Betts (lead guitar, vocals, songwriting), Berry Oakley (bass guitar), Butch Trucks (drums), and Jai Johanny "Jaimoe" Johanson (drums).

The Allman Brothers Band, March 1971. From left to right: Dickey Betts, Duane Allman, Gregg Allman, Jaimoe Johanson, Berry Oakley, Butch Trucks.
"The Big House", seen here in 2009: The band lived at the house in the early 1970s.
Duane Allman, the group's leader, was killed in a motorcycle crash in 1971.
Gregg Allman on the band's 1975 tour
Keyboardist Chuck Leavell began contributing to the band in 1973.
Guitarist Warren Haynes, seen here in the late 1990s, joined the band for their second reunion.
The band's 2009 residency at New York's Beacon Theatre was considered a career highlight.
Derek Trucks joined in 1999 and became the band's youngest member.
Guest appearances during the "Beacon Run" were common. Here Eric Clapton joins the band in March 2009 to play songs from 1970's Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, which had featured Duane Allman.

Their first two studio releases, The Allman Brothers Band (1969) and Idlewild South (1970) (both released by Capricorn Records), stalled commercially, but their 1971 live release At Fillmore East was an artistic and commercial breakthrough.

Meanwhile, Phil Walden, the manager of the late Otis Redding and several other R&B acts, was looking to expand into rock acts.