Ignatius of Loyola

St. Ignatius of LoyolaIgnatius LoyolaSaint Ignatius of LoyolaSt. IgnatiusSt. Ignatius LoyolaSaint IgnatiusIgnatianIgnatiusLoyolaSt Ignatius of Loyola
Saint Ignatius of Loyola (Ignazio Loiolakoa; Ignacio de Loyola; Ignatius de Loyola; c. 23 October 1491 – 31 July 1556) was a Spanish Basque Catholic priest and theologian, who co-founded the religious order called the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and became its first Superior General at Paris in 1541.wikipedia
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Society of Jesus

JesuitJesuitsS.J.
23 October 1491 – 31 July 1556) was a Spanish Basque Catholic priest and theologian, who co-founded the religious order called the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and became its first Superior General at Paris in 1541.
It was founded by Ignatius of Loyola with the approval of Pope Paul III in 1540.

Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola

Spiritual ExercisesSpiritual Exercises of St. IgnatiusIgnatian exercises
He recorded his method in a celebrated treatise called the Spiritual Exercises, a simple set of meditations, prayers, and other mental exercises, first published in 1548.
The Spiritual Exercises of Ignatius of Loyola (Latin original: Exercitia spiritualia), composed 1522–1524, are a set of Christian meditations, contemplations, and prayers written by Ignatius of Loyola, a 16th-century Spanish priest, theologian, and founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits).

Superior General of the Society of Jesus

Superior GeneralJesuit Superior GeneralSuperior-General of the Society of Jesus
23 October 1491 – 31 July 1556) was a Spanish Basque Catholic priest and theologian, who co-founded the religious order called the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and became its first Superior General at Paris in 1541.

Azpeitia

LoyolaAzpeitia, GipuzkoaElosiaga
Íñigo López de Loyola (sometimes erroneously called Íñigo López de Recalde) was born in the municipality of Azpeitia at the castle of Loyola in today's Gipuzkoa, Basque Country, Spain.
Azpeitia is the birthplace of Ignatius of Loyola.

Basques

BasqueBasque peopleBasque culture
23 October 1491 – 31 July 1556) was a Spanish Basque Catholic priest and theologian, who co-founded the religious order called the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) and became its first Superior General at Paris in 1541.
Ignatius Loyola, founder of the Society of Jesus, was a Basque.

Íñigo of Oña

EnnecoSaint IñigoSaint Íñigo's Day
He was baptized Íñigo, after St. Enecus (Innicus) (Eneko; Íñigo) Abbot of Oña, a Basque medieval, affectionate name meaning "My little one".
Ignatius of Loyola was named after him.

Gipuzkoa

GuipúzcoaGuipuzcoaGuipuscoa
He is the patron saint of the Basque provinces of Gipuzkoa and Biscay as well as the Society of Jesus, and was declared patron saint of all spiritual retreats by Pope Pius XI in 1922.
Traditionally a Catholic province, its patron saints are Ignatius of Loyola, born in the neighborhood of Loyola (Azpeitia) and founder of the Society of Jesus, and Our Lady of Arantzazu.

Manresa

Televisió de Manresa
From Montserrat he walked on to the nearby town of Manresa (Catalonia), where he lived for about a year, begging for his keep, and then eventually doing chores at a local hospital in exchange for food and lodging.
Saint Ignatius of Loyola stopped to pray in the town on his way back from Montserrat in 1522.

Ludolph of Saxony

Ludolf of SaxonyLudolph the CarthusianLudolphus of Saxony
The religious work which most particularly struck him was the De Vita Christi of Ludolph of Saxony.
It had significant influence on the development of techniques for Christian meditation by introducing the concept of immersing and projecting oneself into a Biblical scene about the life of Jesus which became popular among the Devotio Moderna community, and later influenced Ignatius of Loyola.

Francis Xavier

St. Francis XavierSaint Francis XavierSt Francis Xavier
— Francis Xavier, Alfonso Salmeron, Diego Laynez, and Nicholas Bobadilla, all Spanish; Peter Faber, a Savoyard; and Simão Rodrigues of Portugal.
Born in Javier (Xavier in Navarro-Aragonese or Xabier in Basque), Kingdom of Navarre (in present-day Spain), he was a companion of Saint Ignatius of Loyola and one of the first seven Jesuits who took vows of poverty and chastity at Montmartre, Paris, in 1534.

List of battles of the Italian Wars

Battle of PampelunaSack of BresciaSiege of Mézières
But at the Battle of Pamplona in 1521 he was gravely injured when a French-Navarrese expedition force stormed the fortress of Pamplona on 20 May 1521, and a cannonball ricocheting off a nearby wall shattered his right leg.
It was at this battle that Inigo Lopez de Loyola, better known as St. Ignatius of Loyola, suffered severe injuries, a Navarrese cannonball shattering his leg.

Counter-Reformation

Counter ReformationCounterreformationCatholic Reformation
They therefore emerged as an important force during the time of the Counter-Reformation.
The Catholic Reformation was not only a political and church policy oriented movement, but it also included major figures such as Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Ávila, John of the Cross, Francis de Sales, and Philip Neri, who added to the spirituality of the Catholic Church.

Alfonso Salmeron

Alfonso Salmerón
— Francis Xavier, Alfonso Salmeron, Diego Laynez, and Nicholas Bobadilla, all Spanish; Peter Faber, a Savoyard; and Simão Rodrigues of Portugal.
Here, through Diego Laynez, he met St. Ignatius of Loyola and with Laynez, St. Peter Faber and St. Francis Xavier, he enlisted as one of the first companions of Loyola in 1534.

Messina

MessanaZancleMessina, Italy
A Jesuit college was opened at Messina, which proved a success, and its rules and methods were afterwards copied in other colleges.
The city has the University of Messina, founded in 1548 by Ignatius of Loyola.

Vita Christi

De Vita ChristiVitae Christi
The religious work which most particularly struck him was the De Vita Christi of Ludolph of Saxony.
Saint Ignatius of Loyola used these techniques in his Spiritual Exercises, e.g. self-projection into a Biblical scene to start a conversation with Christ in Calvary.

Church of Saint-Pierre de Montmartre

Saint-Pierre de MontmartreSaint Pierre de MontmartreChurch of Saint Pierre de Montmartre
"On the morning of the 15th of August, 1534, in the chapel of church of Saint Peter, at Montmartre, Loyola and his six companions, of whom only one was a priest, met and took upon themselves the solemn vows of their lifelong work."
According to the earliest biography of Saint Ignatius Loyola, the martyrium of Montmartre Abbey was the location at which the vows were taken that led to the founding of the Society of Jesus.

Meditation

meditativemeditatemeditating
He recorded his method in a celebrated treatise called the Spiritual Exercises, a simple set of meditations, prayers, and other mental exercises, first published in 1548.
Western Christian meditation was further developed by saints such as Ignatius of Loyola and Teresa of Avila in the 16th century.

Juan Alfonso de Polanco

Ignatius, along with the help of his personal secretary Juan Alfonso de Polanco wrote the Jesuit Constitutions, adopted in 1553.
From 1547 to 1556 he was the secretary of Ignatius of Loyola and one of his closest advisers.

Peter Faber

Pierre FavrePeter FavrePeter Faber, S.J.
— Francis Xavier, Alfonso Salmeron, Diego Laynez, and Nicholas Bobadilla, all Spanish; Peter Faber, a Savoyard; and Simão Rodrigues of Portugal.
At the university, Faber also met Ignatius of Loyola and became one of his associates.

Church of the Gesù

Church of the GesuIl GesùChiesa del Gesù
In 1568 that church was pulled down and replaced with the Church of the Gesù.
First conceived in 1551 by Saint Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits Society of Jesus, and active during the Protestant Reformation and the subsequent Catholic Counter-Reformation, the Gesù was also the home of the Superior General of the Society of Jesus until the suppression of the order in 1773.

Ad maiorem Dei gloriam

Ad Majorem Dei GloriamA.M.D.G.A. M. D. G.
But his main principle became the Jesuit motto: Ad maiorem Dei gloriam ("for the greater glory of God").
The origin of the phrase is attributed to the founder of the Jesuits, Saint Ignatius of Loyola, who intended it to serve as a cornerstone sentiment of the society's religious philosophy.

Santa Maria de Montserrat Abbey

Santa Maria de MontserratMontserratMonastery of Montserrat
In March 1522, he visited the Benedictine monastery of Santa Maria de Montserrat.
On the right are the Saint Peter chapel with the image of St. Peter by Josep Viladomat (1945); the St. Ignatius of Loyola chapel by Venanci Vallmitjana with a painting of the St. Ignaitious by Ramir Lorenzale (1893); the St. Martin of Tours chapel, work of Josep Llimona, with the images of St. Martin, St. Placidus and St. Maurus (1898); the St. Joseph Calasanz chapel with an altarpiece of Francesc Berenguer (1891); and that of St. Benedict with a painting of the founding saint of the Benedictine Order (1980) by Montserrat Gudiol.

Simão Rodrigues

Simon RodriguesRodrigues
— Francis Xavier, Alfonso Salmeron, Diego Laynez, and Nicholas Bobadilla, all Spanish; Peter Faber, a Savoyard; and Simão Rodrigues of Portugal.
A Portuguese nobleman, Rodrigues was one of the six very first companions of Ignatius of Loyola at the University of Paris who took vows of poverty and chastity at the chapel of Montmartre, on the 15 August 1534.

Diego Laynez

Diego LaínezDiego LáynezJames Laynez
— Francis Xavier, Alfonso Salmeron, Diego Laynez, and Nicholas Bobadilla, all Spanish; Peter Faber, a Savoyard; and Simão Rodrigues of Portugal.
He graduated from the University of Alcalá, and then continued his studies in Paris, where he came under the influence of Ignatius of Loyola.

University of Paris

SorbonneParisLa Sorbonne
After these adventurous activities, Íñigo (by now Ignatius) moved to Paris to study at the famous University.
The Collège de Montaigu was founded by the Archbishop of Rouen in the 14th century, and reformed in the 15th century by the humanist Jan Standonck, when it attracted reformers from within the Roman Catholic Church (such as Erasmus and Ignatius of Loyola) and those who subsequently became Protestants (John Calvin and John Knox).