Iliad

The IliadIlliadIliasHomer's IliadHomericThe IlliadHomer's ''The IliadHomer's ''IliadHomer’s IliadI racconti dell'Iliade
The Iliad (, in Classical Attic; sometimes referred to as the Song of Ilion or Song of Ilium) is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer.wikipedia
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Homer

HomericHomeric epicsHomeric poems
The Iliad (, in Classical Attic; sometimes referred to as the Song of Ilion or Song of Ilium) is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer.
Homer (, Hómēros) is the legendary author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, two epic poems that are the central works of ancient Greek literature.

Trojan War

Fall of TroySiege of TroyTroy
Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles.
The war is one of the most important events in Greek mythology and has been narrated through many works of Greek literature, most notably Homer's Iliad.

Achilles

Achilleustragic championA'''chilles
Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles. After nine days of plague, Achilles, the leader of the Myrmidon contingent, calls an assembly to deal with the problem.
In Greek mythology, Achilles or Achilleus was a hero of the Trojan War, the greatest of all the Greek warriors, and is the central character of Homer's Iliad.

Troy

TrojanTrojansIlium
Set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy (Ilium) by a coalition of Greek states, it tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the warrior Achilles.
It was the setting of the Trojan War described in the Greek Epic Cycle, in particular in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer.

Odyssey

The OdysseyHomer's OdysseyHomer's ''Odyssey
The Iliad is paired with something of a sequel, the Odyssey, also attributed to Homer.
It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other Homeric epic.

Dactylic hexameter

hexameterhexametersdactylic hexameters
The Iliad (, in Classical Attic; sometimes referred to as the Song of Ilion or Song of Ilium) is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer.
Some premier examples of its use are Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil's Aeneid, and Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
The Iliad (, in Classical Attic; sometimes referred to as the Song of Ilion or Song of Ilium) is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer.
Homeric Greek is a literary form of Archaic Greek (derived primarily from Ionic and Aeolic) used in the epic poems, the Iliad and the Odyssey, and in later poems by other authors.

Homeric Greek

HomericHomeric dialectEpic Greek
In the modern vulgate (the standard accepted version), the Iliad contains 15,693 lines; it is written in Homeric Greek, a literary amalgam of Ionic Greek and other dialects.
Homeric Greek is the form of the Greek language that was used by Homer in the Iliad and Odyssey and in the Homeric Hymns.

Briseis

BriseidaBreseydaBrisêis
Under pressure, Agamemnon agrees to return Chryseis to her father, but decides to take Achilles' captive, Briseis, as compensation.
Brisēís ("daughter of Briseus"), also known as Hippodámeia, is a significant character in the Iliad.

Myrmidons

MyrmidonMyrmidoneslegendary warriors
After nine days of plague, Achilles, the leader of the Myrmidon contingent, calls an assembly to deal with the problem.
In Homer's Iliad, the Myrmidons are the soldiers commanded by Achilles.

Odysseus

UlyssesUlisseKing of Ithaca
Odysseus takes a ship and returns Chryseis to her father, whereupon Apollo ends the plague.
Odysseus also plays a key role in Homer's Iliad and other works in that same epic cycle.

Zeus

JupiterCronidesZeus Chrysaoreus
Achilles asks his mother to ask Zeus to bring the Greeks to the breaking point by the Trojans, so Agamemnon will realize how much the Greeks need Achilles.
At the oracle of Dodona, his consort was said to be Dione, by whom the Iliad states that he fathered Aphrodite.

Greeks

GreekHellenesGreek people
After an invocation to the Muses, the story launches in medias res towards the end of the Trojan War between the Trojans and the besieging Greeks.
The Homeric Epics (i.e. Iliad and Odyssey) were especially and generally accepted as part of the Greek past and it was not until the time of Euhemerism that scholars began to question Homer's historicity.

In medias res

in media resbegins in the middle of the actionimmediately before a final battle over Paradise Falls
After an invocation to the Muses, the story launches in medias res towards the end of the Trojan War between the Trojans and the besieging Greeks.
In Homer's Iliad there are fewer flashbacks, although it opens in the thick of the Trojan War.

Chryseis

his daughter
Chryses, a Trojan priest of Apollo, offers the Greeks wealth for the return of his daughter Chryseis, held captive by Agamemnon, the Greek leader.
Chryseis, her apparent name in the Iliad, means simply "Chryses' daughter"; later writers give her real name as Astynome .

Athena

Pallas AthenaPallasPallas Athene
The plan backfires, and only the intervention of Odysseus, inspired by Athena, stops a rout.
She plays an active role in the Iliad, in which she assists the Achaeans and, in the Odyssey, she is the divine counselor to Odysseus.

Menelaus

MenelaosKing MenelausMenalaus
The armies approach each other, but before they meet, Paris offers to end the war by fighting a duel with Menelaus, urged by his brother and head of the Trojan army, Hector.
According to the Iliad, Menelaus was a central figure in the Trojan War, leading the Spartan contingent of the Greek army, under his elder brother Agamemnon, king of Mycenae.

Thersites

Odysseus confronts and beats Thersites, a common soldier who voices discontent about fighting Agamemnon's war.
The Iliad does not mention his father's name, which may suggest that he should be viewed as a commoner rather than an aristocratic hero.

Epic poetry

epic poemepicepics
The Iliad (, in Classical Attic; sometimes referred to as the Song of Ilion or Song of Ilium) is an ancient Greek epic poem in dactylic hexameter, traditionally attributed to Homer.
The longest epic written is the ancient Indian Mahabharata, which consists of 100,000 ślokas or over 200,000 verse lines (each shloka is a couplet), as well as long prose passages, so that at ~1.8 million words it is roughly four times the length of the Rāmāyaṇa, and roughly ten times the length of the Iliad and the Odyssey combined.

Aphrodite

CyprisVenusAphrodite Urania
Paris is beaten, but Aphrodite rescues him and leads him to bed with Helen before Menelaus can kill him.
In Homer's Iliad, however, she is the daughter of Zeus and Dione.

Ionic Greek

IonicIonic dialectIonian
In the modern vulgate (the standard accepted version), the Iliad contains 15,693 lines; it is written in Homeric Greek, a literary amalgam of Ionic Greek and other dialects.
The works of Homer (The Iliad, The Odyssey, and the Homeric Hymns) and of Hesiod were written in a literary dialect called Homeric Greek or Epic Greek, which largely comprises Old Ionic, with some borrowings from the neighboring Aeolic dialect to the north.

Helen of Troy

HelenHelen of SpartaHelena
While Helen tells Priam about the Greek commanders from the walls of Troy, both sides swear a truce and promise to abide by the outcome of the duel.
Elements of her putative biography come from classical authors such as Aristophanes, Cicero, Euripides, and Homer (in both the Iliad and the Odyssey).

Ares

god of the same namegod of warMars
Emboldened by Athena, Diomedes wounds Ares and puts him out of action.
In the Iliad, his father Zeus tells him that he is the god most hateful to him.

Apollo

PhoebusPythian ApolloApollo Carneius
Chryses, a Trojan priest of Apollo, offers the Greeks wealth for the return of his daughter Chryseis, held captive by Agamemnon, the Greek leader.
The function of Apollo as a "healer" is connected with Paean, the physician of the Gods in the Iliad, who seems to come from a more primitive religion.

Thracians

Thracianancient ThraceThrace
Later that night, Odysseus and Diomedes venture out to the Trojan lines, kill the Trojan Dolon, and wreak havoc in the camps of some Thracian allies of Troy's.
The first historical record of the Thracians is found in the Iliad, where they are described as allies of the Trojans in the Trojan War against the Ancient Greeks.