A report on Illinois and Mississippi River

The beginning of the Mississippi River at Lake Itasca (2004)
Mississippian copper plate found at the Saddle Site in Union County, Illinois
Former head of navigation, St. Anthony Falls, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Illinois in 1718, approximate modern state area highlighted, from Carte de la Louisiane et du cours du Mississipi by Guillaume de L'Isle
Confluence of the Wisconsin and Mississippi Rivers, viewed from Wyalusing State Park in Wisconsin
The bell donated by King Louis XV in 1741 to the mission at Kaskaskia. It was later called the "Liberty Bell of the West", after it was rung to celebrate U.S. victory in the Revolution
The Upper Mississippi River at its confluence with the Missouri River north of St. Louis
In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. The southern portion of Illinois Territory was admitted as the state of Illinois, and the rest was joined to Michigan Territory.
The confluence of the Mississippi (left) and Ohio (right) rivers at Cairo, Illinois, the demarcation between the Middle and the Lower Mississippi River
[[Old State Capitol State Historic Site|
Old State Capitol]]: Abraham Lincoln and other area legislators were instrumental in moving the state capitol to centrally located Springfield in 1839.
Lower Mississippi River near New Orleans
Embarkation of Union troops from Cairo on January 10, 1862
Map of the Mississippi River watershed
Charles Mound, the highest natural point in Illinois at 1,235 feet above sea level, is located in the Driftless Area in the northwestern part of the state.
Sequence of NASA MODIS images showing the outflow of fresh water from the Mississippi (arrows) into the Gulf of Mexico (2004)
At 279 feet above sea level, the lowest elevation point in the state is located near Cairo and the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
View along the former riverbed at the Tennessee/Arkansas state line near Reverie, Tennessee (2007)
Köppen climate types of Illinois
In Minnesota, the Mississippi River runs through the Twin Cities (2007)
Density map displaying the population of Illinois
Community of boathouses on the Mississippi River in Winona, MN (2006)
The Baháʼí House of Worship in Wilmette, Illinois
The Mississippi River at the Chain of Rocks just north of St. Louis (2005)
The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago at the heart of Chicago's financial center
A low-water dam deepens the pool above the Chain of Rocks Lock near St. Louis (2006)
Byron Nuclear Generating Station in Ogle County
The Stone Arch Bridge, the Third Avenue Bridge and the Hennepin Avenue Bridge in Minneapolis (2004)
Average annual wind power distribution for Illinois, 50 m height above ground (2009)
The Dubuque-Wisconsin Bridge (2004)
Soldier Field, Chicago
The Chain of Rocks Bridge at St. Louis, Missouri
The Illinois State Capitol in Springfield
The Hernando de Soto Bridge in Memphis, Tennessee (2009)
Illinois House of Representatives
Vicksburg Bridge
Governor J. B. Pritzker (D)
Towboat and barges at Memphis, Tennessee
University of Illinois
Ships on the lower part of the Mississippi
University of Chicago
Oil tanker on the Lower Mississippi near the Port of New Orleans
University of Illinois Willard Airport
Barge on the Lower Mississippi River
Inside O'Hare International Airport
Lock and Dam No. 11, north of Dubuque, Iowa (2007)
Vandalia State House State Historic Site in Vandalia
Lock and Dam No. 2, near Hastings, Minnesota (2007)
The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago
Lock and Dam No. 15, is the largest roller dam in the world Davenport, Iowa; Rock Island, Illinois. (1990)
Magnolia Manor is a Victorian period historic house museum in Cairo.
Formation of the Atchafalaya River and construction of the Old River Control Structure.
Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield
Project design flood flow capacity for the Mississippi river in thousands of cubic feet per second.
The Polish Museum of America in Chicago
Soldiers of the Missouri Army National Guard sandbag the River in Clarksville, Missouri, June 2008, following flooding.
A Railway Post Office preserved at the Illinois Railway Museum in Union
Discovery of the Mississippi by De Soto A.D. 1541 by William Henry Powell depicts Hernando de Soto and Spanish Conquistadores seeing the Mississippi River for the first time.
Standard license plate introduced in 2017
Map of the French settlements (blue) in North America in 1750, before the French and Indian War (1754 to 1763).
Standard license plate 2001 to 2016
Ca. 1681 map of Marquette and Jolliet's 1673 expedition.
Illinois license plate design used throughout the 1980s and 1990s, displaying the Land of Lincoln slogan that has been featured on the state's plates since 1954
Route of the Marquette-Jolliete Expedition of 1673
Illinois 2020 Population Density Map
A Home on the Mississippi (1871)
Shifting sand bars made early navigation difficult.
Battle of Vicksburg (ca. 1888)
Mississippi River from Eunice, Arkansas, a settlement destroyed by gunboats during the Civil War.
Campsite at the river in Arkansas
The Old River Control Structure complex. View is to the east-southeast, looking downriver on the Mississippi, with the three dams across channels of the Atchafalaya River to the right of the Mississippi. Concordia Parish, Louisiana is in the foreground, on the right, and Wilkinson County, Mississippi, is in the background, across the Mississippi on the left.
Great River Road in Wisconsin near Lake Pepin (2005)
The American paddlefish is an ancient relict from the Mississippi
The source of the Mississippi River at Lake Itasca

Owing to its central location and geography, the state is a major transportation hub: the Port of Chicago enjoys access to the Atlantic Ocean through the Great Lakes and Saint Lawrence Seaway, and to the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi River via the Illinois Waterway.

- Illinois

The river either borders or passes through the states of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana.

- Mississippi River

24 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Wisconsin

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State in the upper Midwestern United States.

State in the upper Midwestern United States.

Wisconsin in 1718, Guillaume de L'Isle map, with the approximate state area highlighted
Jean Nicolet, depicted in a 1910 painting by Frank Rohrbeck, was probably the first European to explore Wisconsin. The mural is located in the Brown County Courthouse in Green Bay.
French-Canadian voyageur Joseph Roi built the Tank Cottage in Green Bay in 1776. Located in Heritage Hill State Historical Park, it is the oldest standing building from Wisconsin's early years and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
The Little White Schoolhouse in Ripon, Wisconsin, held the nation's first meeting of the Republican Party.
The Wisconsin 8th Volunteer Eagle Regiment with Old Abe
Drawing of Industrial Milwaukee in 1882
The Daniel E. Krause Stone Barn in Chase was built in 1903, as dairy farming spread across the state.
Wisconsin Governor Robert La Follette addresses an assembly, 1905
Wisconsin, from an altitude of 206 nautical miles (237 statute miles; 382 km) at 7:43:39 AM CDT on March 11, 2012 during Expedition 30 of the International Space Station.
Wisconsin is divided into five geographic regions.
The Driftless Area of southwestern Wisconsin is characterized by bluffs carved in sedimentary rock by water from melting Ice Age glaciers.
Timms Hill is the highest natural point in Wisconsin at 1951.5 ft; it is located in the Town of Hill, Price County.
Köppen climate types of Wisconsin
Wisconsin 2010 Population Density Map
The Wisconsin State Capitol is located on the isthmus between Lake Mendota and Lake Monona, in the city of Madison.
Executive seal of Wisconsin
The Senate Chamber of the Wisconsin State Capitol
Wisconsin Budget (2021)
Wisconsin congressman Paul Ryan was the 2012 Republican Party nominee for vice-president.
The 2011 Wisconsin Act 10 led to large protests around the state capitol building in Madison.
The U.S. Bank Center in downtown Milwaukee is home to the headquarters of Foley & Lardner, Robert W. Baird & Company, Sensient Technologies Corporation, and is the Milwaukee office for U.S. Bank, IBM, and CBRE.
State welcome sign
Wisconsin counties
Music stage at Summerfest, 1994
The Milwaukee Art Museum
Frank Lloyd Wright's Taliesin in Spring Green
Lambeau Field in Green Bay is home to the NFL's Packers.
American Family Field is the home stadium of Major League Baseball's Milwaukee Brewers.
Wisconsin 2020 Population Density Map

It is bordered by Minnesota to the west, Iowa to the southwest, Illinois to the south, Lake Michigan to the east, Michigan to the northeast, and Lake Superior to the north.

In 1673, Jacques Marquette and Louis Jolliet became the first to record a journey on the Fox-Wisconsin Waterway all the way to the Mississippi River near Prairie du Chien.

Iowa

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Excavation of the 3,800-year-old Edgewater Park Site
Iowa in 1718 with the modern state area highlighted
Iowa Territorial Seal
Bellevue along the Mississippi, 1848
Topography of Iowa, with counties and major streams
DeSoto Lake at DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge
Landforms of Iowa, based on Prior (1991)
Köppen climate types of Iowa, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Iowa annual rainfall, in inches
Percent population changes by counties in Iowa, 2000–2009. Dark green counties have gains of more than 5%.
Iowa population density map
Population age comparison between rural Pocahontas County and urban Polk County, illustrating the flight of young adults (red) to urban centers in Iowa
Amana Colonies were founded by German Pietists.
The Christina Reiman Butterfly Wing at Iowa State University, Ames
Skyline of Des Moines, Iowa's capital and largest city
Old Capitol, Iowa City
Inside the Davenport Skybridge
Brucemore, Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Historic Fourth Street, Sioux City
Loess Hills east of Mondamin
The Iowa Great Lakes located primarily in Dickinson County, in the northwestern section of Iowa near the Minnesota border.
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Ruins of historic Fort Atkinson
Wood-heated floating sauna on the farm pond
Iowa gross state products by industry, 2009
Harvesting corn in Jones County
Farm in rural Northwest Iowa
Central Iowa cornfield and dairy in June
Mural in Mt. Ayr Post Office, "The Corn Parade" by Orr C. Fischer, commissioned as part of the New Deal
Ethanol plant under construction in Butler County
Wind turbines near Williams
Palmer Chiropractic College in Davenport is the first school of chiropractic in the world.
Iowa's major interstates, larger cities, and counties
The Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines, completed in 1886, is the only state capitol in the United States to feature five domes, a central golden dome surrounded by four smaller ones. It houses the Iowa General Assembly, comprising the Iowa House of Representatives and Iowa Senate.
The Iowa Supreme Court, across from the capitol, is the state's highest court.
Samuel J. Kirkwood, founder of the Iowa Republican Party, abolitionist, and Iowa's Civil War Governor
The Union Block building, Mount Pleasant, scene of early civil rights and women's rights activities
Schaeffer Hall (University of Iowa, Iowa City)
Riverside's "favorite son"
South End Zone of Iowa State University's Jack Trice Stadium in Ames, IA.
Modern Woodmen Park is home to the Quad Cities baseball team.
President Herbert Hoover
Vice President Henry Wallace
Iowa 2020 Population Density map

Iowa is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States, bordered by the Mississippi River to the east and the Missouri River and Big Sioux River to the west.

It is bordered by six states: Wisconsin to the northeast, Illinois to the east and southeast, Missouri to the south, Nebraska to the west, South Dakota to the northwest, and Minnesota to the north.

Missouri

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State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

State in the Midwestern region of the United States.

The Gateway Arch in St. Louis
Fur Traders Descending the Missouri by Missouri painter George Caleb Bingham
The states and territories of the United States as a result of Missouri's admission as a state on August 10, 1821. The remainder of the former Missouri Territory became unorganized territory.
Price's Raid in the Trans-Mississippi Theater, 1864
Union Station in St. Louis was the world's largest and busiest train station when it opened in 1894.
Child shoe workers in Kirksville, Missouri, 1910
General John J. Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, was raised in Laclede, Missouri.
African American boy in a sharecropper shack, New Madrid County, 1938.
A physiographic map of Missouri
The Bell Mountain Wilderness of southern Missouri's Mark Twain National Forest
Köppen climate types of Missouri
The Lake of the Ozarks is one of several man-made lakes in Missouri, created by the damming of several rivers and tributaries. The lake has a surface area of 54,000 acres and 1,150 miles of shoreline and has become a popular tourist destination.
Missouri River near Rocheport, Missouri
Missouri population density map
The population center for the United States has been in Missouri since 1980. As of 2020, it is near Interstate 44 in Missouri as it approaches Springfield.
Missouri State quarter featuring the Lewis and Clark expedition
Meramec Caverns
The Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City services the western portion of Missouri, as well as all of Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, and northern New Mexico.
Amtrak station in Kirkwood
Kansas City Streetcar near Union Station
The Mississippi River at Hannibal
The Missouri State Capitol in Jefferson City
The Governor's Mansion is on the National Register of Historic Places.
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
Jesse Hall on the University of Missouri campus
Brookings Hall at Washington University in St. Louis
The historic Gem Theatre, located in Kansas City's renowned 18th and Vine Jazz District
Mark Twain's boyhood home in Hannibal
Missouri has four major sports teams: the Royals and Cardinals of MLB, the Chiefs of the NFL, and the Blues of the NHL.
A mural honoring the Kansas City Chiefs on the wall of the Westport Alehouse in Kansas City, MO.
The St. Louis Cardinals playing at Busch Stadium

Ranking 21st in land area, it is bordered by eight states (tied for the most with Tennessee): Iowa to the north, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee to the east, Arkansas to the south and Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska to the west.

The Missouri River, after which the state is named, flows through the center into the Mississippi River, which makes up the eastern border.

Satellite image of the Great Lakes, April 24, 2000

Great Lakes

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The Great Lakes, also called the Great Lakes of North America or the Laurentian Great Lakes, are a series of large interconnected freshwater lakes with certain sea-like characteristics in the mid-east region of North America that connect to the Atlantic Ocean via the Saint Lawrence River.

The Great Lakes, also called the Great Lakes of North America or the Laurentian Great Lakes, are a series of large interconnected freshwater lakes with certain sea-like characteristics in the mid-east region of North America that connect to the Atlantic Ocean via the Saint Lawrence River.

Satellite image of the Great Lakes, April 24, 2000
Terra MODIS image of the Great Lakes, January 27, 2005, showing ice beginning to build up around the shores of each of the lakes, with snow on the ground; Green Bay, the North Channel, Saginaw Bay, and Lake St. Clair show complete ice coverage.
Location in North America
A map of the Great Lakes Basin showing the five sub-basins. Left to right they are: Superior (magenta); Michigan (cyan); Huron (green); Erie (yellow); Ontario (orange-red).
Lake Michigan–Huron with north oriented to the right; taken on April 14, 2022 during Expedition 67 of the International Space Station. Green Bay is at the upper left and Saginaw Bay is on the right.
South Bass Island in Lake Erie
Toronto on Lake Ontario is in the eastern section of the Great Lakes Megalopolis
Water levels of Lakes Michigan and Huron in the United States, 1918 to 2019.
The Great Lakes, as photographed from the International Space Station
A diagram of the formation of the Great Lakes
Map of Glacial Lake Algonquin and its Correlatives (USGS 1915)
The location of common lake effect bands on the Great Lakes
Lake sturgeon, the largest native fish in the Great Lakes and the subject of extensive commercial fishing in the 19th and 20th centuries is listed as a threatened species
Cliffs at Palisade Head on Lake Superior in Minnesota near Silver Bay.
A zebra mussel–encrusted vector-averaging current meter from Lake Michigan.
Diatoms of different sizes seen through the microscope. These minuscule phytoplankton are encased within a silicate cell wall.
A woodcut of Le Griffon
The passenger ship (foreground) leaving Chicago, c. 1909
Photograph of Lakes Ontario, Erie and Huron plus the Finger Lakes of upstate New York, June 14, 2012, taken aboard the International Space Station, with lake names added
Escanaba's Ludington Park in Michigan
Various national, state, provincial, and municipal jurisdictions govern the Great Lakes
Satellite image of the Great Lakes taken by the Terra satellite on June 16, 2021
Chicago on Lake Michigan is in the western part of the lakes megalopolis and the site of the waterway linking the lakes to the Mississippi River valley
Detroit on the Detroit River links the region's central metropolitan areas

The lakes are divided among the jurisdictions of the Canadian province of Ontario and the U.S. states of Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York.

The Chicago River and Calumet River systems connect the Great Lakes Basin to the Mississippi River System through human-made alterations and canals.

Lake Michigan on April 10, 2022; from the International Space Station

Lake Michigan

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One of the five Great Lakes of North America.

One of the five Great Lakes of North America.

Lake Michigan on April 10, 2022; from the International Space Station
Taken from Resourcesat-2 on July 3, 2022
Lake Michigan basin
SS Badger operates ferry services between Manitowoc and Ludington
Most islands in Lake Michigan are in the northern part of the lake. Photo taken from the International Space Station on April 10, 2022.
Ice volcanoes form from sea ice and protect the coast from erosion.
Lake fisheries postcard produced for the Milwaukee Public Museum, the backside identifies the fishermen as using a pound net.

Located in the United States, it is shared, from west to east, by the states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan.

In 1673, Jacques Marquette, Louis Jolliet and their crew of five Métis voyageurs followed Lake Michigan to Green Bay and up the Fox River, nearly to its headwaters, in their search for the Mississippi River.

Approximate areas of various Mississippian and related cultures

Mississippian culture

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Native American civilization that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 CE to 1600 CE, varying regionally.

Native American civilization that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 CE to 1600 CE, varying regionally.

Approximate areas of various Mississippian and related cultures
A priest with a ceremonial flint mace and severed sacrificial head, based on a repoussé copper plate
Mississippian copper plates
Reconstruction of the Birdman burial at Cahokia.
Mass grave burial at Cahokia of fifty-three sacrificed Native American women
Shell tempered ceramic effigy jug with swirls painted in clay slip, Rose Mound, Cross County, Arkansas, U.S., 1400-1600 CE, 8" (20 cm) high
Replica of a Mississippian house from over 1000 years ago excavated at the Aztalan site of the Oneota region in an exhibit at the Wisconsin Historical Museum
A mound diagram of the Mississippian cultural period showing the multiple layers of mound construction, mound structures such as temples or mortuaries, ramps with log stairs, and prior structures under later layers, multiple terraces, and intrusive burials.
Cahokia, the largest Mississippian culture site
Kincaid, showing its platform mounds and encircling palisade
Stone effigies found at the Etowah Site
Map of the Caddoan Mississippian culture
Spiro, in eastern Oklahoma
Map showing the geographical extent of the Plaquemine culture and some of its major sites
A map showing the de Soto route through the Southeast

The largest city was Cahokia, believed to be a major religious center located in what is present-day southern Illinois.

The Mississippian way of life began to develop in the Mississippi River Valley (for which it is named).

Ohio River

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981 mi long river in the United States.

981 mi long river in the United States.

Steamboat Morning Star, a Louisville and Evansville mail packet, in 1858.
Built between 1847 and 1849, the Wheeling Suspension Bridge was the first bridge across the river and a crucial part of the National Road.
Cave-in-rock, view on the Ohio (circa 1832, Cave-In-Rock, Illinois): aquatint by Karl Bodmer from the book Maximilian, Prince of Wied's Travels in the Interior of North America, during the years 1832–1834
Silver Bridge in Point Pleasant, West Virginia which collapsed into the Ohio River on December 15, 1967, killing 46 people.
A barge heads east on the Ohio River in Louisville, Kentucky.
The confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers is at Cairo, Illinois.
The Ohio River as seen from Fredonia, Indiana.
Natural-color satellite image of the Wabash-Ohio confluence.
Lawrenceburg, Indiana, is one of many towns that use the Ohio as a shipping avenue.
Glacial Lake Ohio
The Allegheny River, left, and Monongahela River join to form the Ohio River at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the largest metropolitan area on the river.
Louisville, Kentucky, The deepest point of the Ohio River is a scour hole just below Cannelton locks and dam (river mile 720.7).
A barge hauls coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only artificial portion of the Ohio River.
Cincinnati skyline showing the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge to Covington, Kentucky.
Carl Perkins Bridge in Portsmouth, Ohio with Ohio River and Scioto River tributary on right.
The Ohio River seen at Sciotoville, from the "Geography of Ohio," 1923

It is located at the boundary of the Midwestern and Southern United States, flowing southwesterly from western Pennsylvania to its mouth on the Mississippi River at the southern tip of Illinois.

Illinois River

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Peoria, Illinois is the largest city on the river
The Illinois River as mapped in 1718, modern Illinois state highlighted.
River tow leaving the Starved Rock Lock headed down river.
The Illinois River, as seen from Starved Rock State Park. The dam (upper-left center) is part of the infrastructure of the Illinois Waterway
Aerial view looking west along the Illinois River, with Marseilles (bottom) and Ottawa (center frame).
Late October 2009 (before the flood)
Early November 2009 (during the flood)

The Illinois River is a principal tributary of the Mississippi River and is approximately 273 mi long.

Located in the U.S. state of Illinois, the river drains a large section of central Illinois, with a drainage basin of 28756.6 sqmi.

Kentucky

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State in the Southeastern region of the United States and one of the states of the Upper South.

State in the Southeastern region of the United States and one of the states of the Upper South.

Abraham Lincoln Birthplace near Hodgenville
A map of Kentucky
Kentucky's regions (click on image for color-coding information)
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Lake Cumberland is the largest artificial American lake east of the Mississippi River by volume.
Once an industrial wasteland, Louisville's reclaimed waterfront now features thousands of trees and miles of walking trails.
Red River Gorge is one of Kentucky's most visited places.
Forest at Otter Creek Outdoor Recreation Area, Meade County, Kentucky
Kentucky Population Density Map
Lexington Theological Seminary (then College of the Bible), 1904
The best selling car in the United States, the Toyota Camry, is manufactured in Georgetown, Kentucky.
The best selling truck in the United States, the Ford F-Series, is manufactured in Louisville, Kentucky.
The Ark Encounter in Williamstown, KY
Spring running of Keeneland in Lexington, KY
William T. Young Library at the University of Kentucky, Kentucky's flagship university.
The J.B. Speed School of Engineering at the University of Louisville, Kentucky's urban research university.
At 484 mi long, Kentucky Route 80 is the longest route in Kentucky, pictured here west of Somerset.
High Bridge over the Kentucky River was the tallest rail bridge in the world when it was completed in 1877.
A barge hauling coal in the Louisville and Portland Canal, the only manmade section of the Ohio River
The governor's mansion in Frankfort
The Kentucky State Capitol building in Frankfort
A map showing Kentucky's six congressional districts
State sign, Interstate 65
Treemap of the popular vote by county, 2016 presidential election
The Buffalo Trace Distillery
Old Louisville is the largest Victorian Historic neighborhood in the United States.
The U.S. 23 Country Music Highway Museum in Paintsville provides background on the country music artists from Eastern Kentucky.
The Hot Brown
Kentucky's Churchill Downs hosts the Kentucky Derby.

Kentucky borders Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio to the north; West Virginia and Virginia to the east; Tennessee to the south; and Missouri to the west.

The state is home to the world's longest cave system in Mammoth Cave National Park, as well as the greatest length of navigable waterways and streams in the contiguous United States and the two largest man-made lakes east of the Mississippi River.

a scene at Seneca, Illinois

Illinois and Michigan Canal

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a scene at Seneca, Illinois
The location and course of the Illinois and Michigan Canal
New lock and dam structures that replaced the historic Illinois and Michigan Canal
Illinois and Michigan Canal west of Willow Springs, where the unused canal is clogged with fallen trees
Fox River Aqueduct in Ottawa, IL
Aux Sable Creek Aqueduct, Morris, IL
Locktenders House and lock at the Aux Sable Creek
Goose Lake Prairie F&WA, Morris, IL
Lock #3, Lockport, IL
Historic Route 66, Illinois Route 53, and I&M Canal overlap in Joliet, IL

The Illinois and Michigan Canal connected the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico.

In Illinois, it ran 96 mi from the Chicago River in Bridgeport, Chicago to the Illinois River at LaSalle-Peru.