A report on Illinois

Mississippian copper plate found at the Saddle Site in Union County, Illinois
Illinois in 1718, approximate modern state area highlighted, from Carte de la Louisiane et du cours du Mississipi by Guillaume de L'Isle
The bell donated by King Louis XV in 1741 to the mission at Kaskaskia. It was later called the "Liberty Bell of the West", after it was rung to celebrate U.S. victory in the Revolution
In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. The southern portion of Illinois Territory was admitted as the state of Illinois, and the rest was joined to Michigan Territory.
[[Old State Capitol State Historic Site|
Old State Capitol]]: Abraham Lincoln and other area legislators were instrumental in moving the state capitol to centrally located Springfield in 1839.
Embarkation of Union troops from Cairo on January 10, 1862
Charles Mound, the highest natural point in Illinois at 1,235 feet above sea level, is located in the Driftless Area in the northwestern part of the state.
At 279 feet above sea level, the lowest elevation point in the state is located near Cairo and the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
Köppen climate types of Illinois
Density map displaying the population of Illinois
The Baháʼí House of Worship in Wilmette, Illinois
The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago at the heart of Chicago's financial center
Byron Nuclear Generating Station in Ogle County
Average annual wind power distribution for Illinois, 50 m height above ground (2009)
Soldier Field, Chicago
The Illinois State Capitol in Springfield
Illinois House of Representatives
Governor J. B. Pritzker (D)
University of Illinois
University of Chicago
University of Illinois Willard Airport
Inside O'Hare International Airport
Vandalia State House State Historic Site in Vandalia
The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago
Magnolia Manor is a Victorian period historic house museum in Cairo.
Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield
The Polish Museum of America in Chicago
A Railway Post Office preserved at the Illinois Railway Museum in Union
Standard license plate introduced in 2017
Standard license plate 2001 to 2016
Illinois license plate design used throughout the 1980s and 1990s, displaying the Land of Lincoln slogan that has been featured on the state's plates since 1954
Illinois 2020 Population Density Map

State in the Midwestern United States.

- Illinois

301 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Approximate areas of various Mississippian and related cultures

Mississippian culture

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Native American civilization that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 CE to 1600 CE, varying regionally.

Native American civilization that flourished in what is now the Midwestern, Eastern, and Southeastern United States from approximately 800 CE to 1600 CE, varying regionally.

Approximate areas of various Mississippian and related cultures
A priest with a ceremonial flint mace and severed sacrificial head, based on a repoussé copper plate
Mississippian copper plates
Reconstruction of the Birdman burial at Cahokia.
Mass grave burial at Cahokia of fifty-three sacrificed Native American women
Shell tempered ceramic effigy jug with swirls painted in clay slip, Rose Mound, Cross County, Arkansas, U.S., 1400-1600 CE, 8" (20 cm) high
Replica of a Mississippian house from over 1000 years ago excavated at the Aztalan site of the Oneota region in an exhibit at the Wisconsin Historical Museum
A mound diagram of the Mississippian cultural period showing the multiple layers of mound construction, mound structures such as temples or mortuaries, ramps with log stairs, and prior structures under later layers, multiple terraces, and intrusive burials.
Cahokia, the largest Mississippian culture site
Kincaid, showing its platform mounds and encircling palisade
Stone effigies found at the Etowah Site
Map of the Caddoan Mississippian culture
Spiro, in eastern Oklahoma
Map showing the geographical extent of the Plaquemine culture and some of its major sites
A map showing the de Soto route through the Southeast

The largest city was Cahokia, believed to be a major religious center located in what is present-day southern Illinois.

Southern Illinois

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Artist's recreation of central Cahokia near East St Louis in St Clair County
Artist's representation of the Kincaid Site on the Ohio River in Massac County, as it may have looked during its peak
The French Fort de Chartres' powder magazine, restored, is thought to be the oldest standing building in Illinois. Made of limestone in 1756.
The Bank of Illinois in Shawneetown, built in 1839–1841, shown in 1937
The majority of Illinois voters in 1824 rejected a proposal for a new constitutional convention that could have made slavery legal outright. A map of Illinois free And slave counties in 1824 showing shaded counties that were favorable to legalizing slavery in Illinois
Belleville around the start of the 20th century.
Southern Illinois is also known as "Little Egypt".
Cairo panoramic map, 1885. The city sits between two rivers, reminding early settlers of the Egyptian Delta.
Southern Illinois, showing the Metro East region in red, East Central Southern Illinois in teal, West Central Southern Illinois in dark green, Southwest Illinois in light green, and Southeastern Illinois in purple.
Granite City downtown and city hall, population 27,549.
Edwardsville, Illinois, Population 26,808.
Grand Rapids Hotel Mount Carmel, Illinois on opening day in 1922
Catholic Church in Kaskaskia.
Bald Knob Cross rises 111 feet above the Shawnee National Forest west of Alto Pass, Illinois.
A statue in Carbondale.
Harrisburg skyline. Harrisburg prospered with one of the largest Southern Illinois downtown districts during the 1920s and had a population of nearly 16,000 people. Today it has a population of about 9,000.
Garden of the Gods, south of Harrisburg, rests in the Shawnee Hills and has an elevation of nearly 800 feet 244(m).
Aerial of Jameson Island in the Big Muddy, view looking south.
Contemporary woodcut of the 1812 New Madrid earthquake.
Quakes in the New Madrid and Wabash Valley seismic zones over several decades.
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The Clark Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge across the Mississippi River between West Alton, Missouri and Alton, Illinois.
The Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge connecting Missouri's Route 34 and Route 74 with Illinois Route 146 across the Mississippi River between Cape Girardeau, Missouri and East Cape Girardeau, Illinois.
The New Harmony Toll Bridge is a through truss bridge that connected Illinois Route 14 and Indiana State Road 66 across the Wabash River between New Harmony, Indiana and rural White County, Illinois until its closure in 2012.
1940 Oil field, Marion County, near Salem, Illinois
The cave at Cave-in-Rock State Park

Southern Illinois, also known as Little Egypt, is the southern third of Illinois, principally along and south of Interstate 64.

Greater St. Louis

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Bi-state metropolitan area that completely surrounds and includes the independent city of St. Louis, the principal city.

Bi-state metropolitan area that completely surrounds and includes the independent city of St. Louis, the principal city.

Brookings Hall, the administrative building for Washington University in St. Louis

It includes parts of both Missouri and Illinois.

Iowa

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State in the Midwestern region of the United States, bordered by the Mississippi River to the east and the Missouri River and Big Sioux River to the west.

State in the Midwestern region of the United States, bordered by the Mississippi River to the east and the Missouri River and Big Sioux River to the west.

Excavation of the 3,800-year-old Edgewater Park Site
Iowa in 1718 with the modern state area highlighted
Iowa Territorial Seal
Bellevue along the Mississippi, 1848
Topography of Iowa, with counties and major streams
DeSoto Lake at DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge
Landforms of Iowa, based on Prior (1991)
Köppen climate types of Iowa, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Iowa annual rainfall, in inches
Percent population changes by counties in Iowa, 2000–2009. Dark green counties have gains of more than 5%.
Iowa population density map
Population age comparison between rural Pocahontas County and urban Polk County, illustrating the flight of young adults (red) to urban centers in Iowa
Amana Colonies were founded by German Pietists.
The Christina Reiman Butterfly Wing at Iowa State University, Ames
Skyline of Des Moines, Iowa's capital and largest city
Old Capitol, Iowa City
Inside the Davenport Skybridge
Brucemore, Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Historic Fourth Street, Sioux City
Loess Hills east of Mondamin
The Iowa Great Lakes located primarily in Dickinson County, in the northwestern section of Iowa near the Minnesota border.
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Ruins of historic Fort Atkinson
Wood-heated floating sauna on the farm pond
Iowa gross state products by industry, 2009
Harvesting corn in Jones County
Farm in rural Northwest Iowa
Central Iowa cornfield and dairy in June
Mural in Mt. Ayr Post Office, "The Corn Parade" by Orr C. Fischer, commissioned as part of the New Deal
Ethanol plant under construction in Butler County
Wind turbines near Williams
Palmer Chiropractic College in Davenport is the first school of chiropractic in the world.
Iowa's major interstates, larger cities, and counties
The Iowa State Capitol in Des Moines, completed in 1886, is the only state capitol in the United States to feature five domes, a central golden dome surrounded by four smaller ones. It houses the Iowa General Assembly, comprising the Iowa House of Representatives and Iowa Senate.
The Iowa Supreme Court, across from the capitol, is the state's highest court.
Samuel J. Kirkwood, founder of the Iowa Republican Party, abolitionist, and Iowa's Civil War Governor
The Union Block building, Mount Pleasant, scene of early civil rights and women's rights activities
Schaeffer Hall (University of Iowa, Iowa City)
Riverside's "favorite son"
South End Zone of Iowa State University's Jack Trice Stadium in Ames, IA.
Modern Woodmen Park is home to the Quad Cities baseball team.
President Herbert Hoover
Vice President Henry Wallace
Iowa 2020 Population Density map

It is bordered by six states: Wisconsin to the northeast, Illinois to the east and southeast, Missouri to the south, Nebraska to the west, South Dakota to the northwest, and Minnesota to the north.

Indiana

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U.S. state in the Midwestern United States.

U.S. state in the Midwestern United States.

Angel Mounds State Historic Site was one of the northernmost Mississippian culture settlements, occupied from 1100 to 1450.
Native Americans guide French explorers through Indiana, as depicted by Maurice Thompson in Stories of Indiana.
Indiana's Capitol Building in Corydon served as the state's seat of government from 1816 until 1825.
Rolling hills in the Charles C. Deam Wilderness Area of Hoosier National Forest, in the Indiana Uplands
The Wabash River converges with the Ohio River at Posey County.
Köppen climate types of Indiana, using 1991-2020 climate normals.
Indiana is home to the third largest population of Amish in the U.S.
Mike Pence at the Indiana State Fair, 2014
Members of the Indiana National Guard at the Muscatatuck Urban Training Center near Butlerville
Indianapolis is home to the annual Indianapolis 500 race.
The Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League have been based in the state since 1984.
Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall, home to Indiana Hoosiers men's basketball
Notre Dame Stadium, home to the Fighting Irish
Lake Michigan's beaches, popular with tourists, are juxtaposed with heavy industry.
Indiana is the fifth largest corn-producing state in the U.S., with over a billion bushels harvested in 2013.
Coal-fired electric plants, like Clifty Creek Power Plant in Madison, produced about 85 percent of Indiana's energy supply in 2014.
The Interstate 69 extension project in Monroe County
A South Shore commuter train in Michigan City
Barges are a common sight along the Ohio River. Ports of Indiana manages three maritime ports in the state, two located on the Ohio.

It is bordered by Lake Michigan to the northwest, Michigan to the north, Ohio to the east, the Ohio River and Kentucky to the south and southeast, and the Wabash River and Illinois to the west.

Metro East

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Region in southern Illinois that contains eastern and northern suburbs and exurbs of St. Louis, Missouri, United States.

Region in southern Illinois that contains eastern and northern suburbs and exurbs of St. Louis, Missouri, United States.

MetroLink in Belleville Illinois
Map of Illinois highlighting Metro East

The Metro East is the second largest urban area in Illinois after the Chicago metropolitan area and, as of the 2000 census, the population of the Metro East statistical area was 599,845 residents, a figure that had risen to above 700,000 in 2010.

Cahokia winter solstice sunrise over Fox Mound and the Cahokia Woodhenge ca. 1000 AD. Artist's concept.

Cahokia

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Site of a pre-Columbian Native American city (which existed c. undefined 1050–1350 CE ) directly across the Mississippi River from modern St. Louis, Missouri.

Site of a pre-Columbian Native American city (which existed c. undefined 1050–1350 CE ) directly across the Mississippi River from modern St. Louis, Missouri.

Cahokia winter solstice sunrise over Fox Mound and the Cahokia Woodhenge ca. 1000 AD. Artist's concept.
A map showing approximate areas of various Mississippian and related cultures. Cahokia is located near the center of this map in the upper part of the Middle Mississippi area.
Artist's recreation of central Cahokia. Cahokia's east-west baseline transects the Woodhenge, Monk's Mound, and several other large mounds.
Mississippian period showing the multiple layers of mound construction, mound structures such as temples or mortuaries, ramps with log stairs, and prior structures under later layers, multiple terraces, and intrusive burials
An 1882 illustration of Monks Mound showing it with fanciful proportions
Incised sandstone tablet of a Birdman found in 1971 during excavations into the east side of Monks Mound
Mound 72
Mississippian culture repoussé copper plates
View of the reconstructed Woodhenge III and its alignment with the equinox pole and Monks Mound 0.5 mi away
Museum and Interpretive Center
A Mississippian-era priest, in the 13th century, Cahokia metropolis, holding a ceremonial flint mace and severed sacrificial head
Tamarois et Caouquias on a French map of Illinois in 1718, south of the confluence of the Illinois and Mississippi rivers (approximate modern state area highlighted) from {{lang|fr|Carte de la Louisiane et du Cours du Mississipi}} by Guillaume de L'Isle
The Rattlesnake Causeway leading from Monks Mound to Mound 66 is the city's ceremonial north-south axis.
The "Chunkey Player" statuette, made of Missouri flint clay, depicts the ancient Native American game of chunkey. The statuette is believed to have been originally crafted at or near Cahokia Mounds; it was excavated at a Mississippian site in Muskogee County, Oklahoma, revealing the reach of the trade network of this culture.
Clay statuette excavated at Cahokia site

This historic park lies in south-western Illinois between East St. Louis and Collinsville.

O'Hare International Airport

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FAA airport diagram
Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat on display in O'Hare's Terminal 2, restored in the markings of "Butch" O'Hare's plane
Reconstructed Brachiosaurus skeleton, formerly in the Field Museum, exhibited at the airport since 1999
Control tower and terminals 3 & 2 seen from ATS (Airport Transit System)
United Airlines Terminal 1, Concourse B
American Airlines Terminal 3 Main Hall
The Terminal 1 underground tunnel connects Concourses B and C
United Airlines Terminal 1, Concourse B

Chicago O'Hare International Airport, typically referred to as O'Hare Airport, Chicago O'Hare, or simply O'Hare, is the main international airport located on the Northwest Side of Chicago, Illinois, 17 mi northwest of the Loop business district.

Constitution of Illinois

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The Constitution of the State of Illinois is the governing document of the state of Illinois.

Engraving from drawing by General Georges-Henri-Victor Collot (1796)

Illinois Confederation

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The Illinois Confederation, also referred to as the Illiniwek or Illini, were made up of 12 to 13 tribes who lived in the Mississippi River Valley.

The Illinois Confederation, also referred to as the Illiniwek or Illini, were made up of 12 to 13 tribes who lived in the Mississippi River Valley.

Engraving from drawing by General Georges-Henri-Victor Collot (1796)
Painted hide with geometric motifs, attributed to the Illinois Confederacy by the French, pre-1800. Collections of the Musée du quai Branly.
Painted Skin representing the Thunderbird. Pre-1800, location not given, but the style strongly suggests this hide was painted at the same time, and perhaps by the same artist, as the lede art.

Eventually member tribes occupied an area reaching from Lake Michicigao (Michigan) to Iowa, Illinois, Missouri, and Arkansas.