A report on Illinois

Mississippian copper plate found at the Saddle Site in Union County, Illinois
Illinois in 1718, approximate modern state area highlighted, from Carte de la Louisiane et du cours du Mississipi by Guillaume de L'Isle
The bell donated by King Louis XV in 1741 to the mission at Kaskaskia. It was later called the "Liberty Bell of the West", after it was rung to celebrate U.S. victory in the Revolution
In 1818, Illinois became the 21st U.S. state. The southern portion of Illinois Territory was admitted as the state of Illinois, and the rest was joined to Michigan Territory.
[[Old State Capitol State Historic Site|
Old State Capitol]]: Abraham Lincoln and other area legislators were instrumental in moving the state capitol to centrally located Springfield in 1839.
Embarkation of Union troops from Cairo on January 10, 1862
Charles Mound, the highest natural point in Illinois at 1,235 feet above sea level, is located in the Driftless Area in the northwestern part of the state.
At 279 feet above sea level, the lowest elevation point in the state is located near Cairo and the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
Köppen climate types of Illinois
Density map displaying the population of Illinois
The Baháʼí House of Worship in Wilmette, Illinois
The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago at the heart of Chicago's financial center
Byron Nuclear Generating Station in Ogle County
Average annual wind power distribution for Illinois, 50 m height above ground (2009)
Soldier Field, Chicago
The Illinois State Capitol in Springfield
Illinois House of Representatives
Governor J. B. Pritzker (D)
University of Illinois
University of Chicago
University of Illinois Willard Airport
Inside O'Hare International Airport
Vandalia State House State Historic Site in Vandalia
The Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago
Magnolia Manor is a Victorian period historic house museum in Cairo.
Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield
The Polish Museum of America in Chicago
A Railway Post Office preserved at the Illinois Railway Museum in Union
Standard license plate introduced in 2017
Standard license plate 2001 to 2016
Illinois license plate design used throughout the 1980s and 1990s, displaying the Land of Lincoln slogan that has been featured on the state's plates since 1954
Illinois 2020 Population Density Map

State in the Midwestern United States.

- Illinois

301 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Morris, Illinois

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Grundy County Speedway shortly before a race in September 2020
Downtown Morris during the Grundy County Corn Festival

Morris is a city in and the county seat of Grundy County, Illinois, United States and part of the southwest Chicago metropolitan area.

The Code Noir, an earlier version of the later Illinois Black codes regulated behavior and treatment of slaves and of free people of color in the French colonial empire, including the Illinois Country of New France from 1685 to 1763

History of slavery in Illinois

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Slavery in Illinois existed for more than a century.

Slavery in Illinois existed for more than a century.

The Code Noir, an earlier version of the later Illinois Black codes regulated behavior and treatment of slaves and of free people of color in the French colonial empire, including the Illinois Country of New France from 1685 to 1763
Indian slave of the Fox tribe either in the Illinois Country or the Nipissing tribe in upper French Colonial Canada, circa 1732
The second Governor of Illinois, Edward Coles brought his slaves from his home state of Virginia to give them their freedom when they arrived in Illinois
The majority of Illinois voters in 1824 rejected a proposal for a new constitutional convention that could have made slavery legal outright. A map of Illinois free And slave counties in 1824 showing shaded counties that were favorable to legalizing slavery in Illinois
Map of the Underground Railroad from 1830-1865 including escape routes that went through Illinois

Illinois did not become a state until 1818, but earlier regional systems of government had already established slavery.

State races by 2020 United States presidential election margin.

Swing state

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In American politics, the term swing state (or battleground state) refers to any state that could reasonably be won by either the Democratic or Republican candidate in a statewide election, most often referring to presidential elections, by a swing in votes.

In American politics, the term swing state (or battleground state) refers to any state that could reasonably be won by either the Democratic or Republican candidate in a statewide election, most often referring to presidential elections, by a swing in votes.

State races by 2020 United States presidential election margin.

They also are likely to win New Mexico and Illinois, based on recent election results.

This 1886 engraving was the most widely reproduced image of the Haymarket massacre. It shows Methodist pastor Samuel Fielden speaking, the bomb exploding, and the riot beginning simultaneously; in reality, Fielden had finished speaking before the explosion.

Haymarket affair

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This 1886 engraving was the most widely reproduced image of the Haymarket massacre. It shows Methodist pastor Samuel Fielden speaking, the bomb exploding, and the riot beginning simultaneously; in reality, Fielden had finished speaking before the explosion.
The revenge flyer
A map of the bombing published by the Chicago Tribune on May 5, 1886
Engraving of police officer Mathias J. Degan, who was killed by the bomb blast
Engraving of the seven anarchists sentenced to die for Degan's murder. An eighth defendant, Oscar Neebe, not shown here, was sentenced to 15 years in prison.
An artist's sketch of the trial, Illinois vs. August Spies et al. (1886)
Exhibit 129a from the Haymarket trial: Chemists testified that the bombs found in Lingg's apartment, including this one, resembled the chemical signature of shrapnel from the Haymarket bomb.
The verdict as reported by Harpers Weekly
Execution of defendants—Engel, Fischer, Parsons, and Spies
Altgeld Monument (by Borglum) erected by the Illinois Legislature in Lincoln Park, Chicago (1915)
This sympathetic engraving by English Arts and Crafts illustrator Walter Crane of "The Anarchists of Chicago" was widely circulated among anarchists, socialists, and labor activists.
Rudolph Schnaubelt was indicted but fled the country. From this photograph, a prosecution witness identified Schnaubelt as the bomber.
A 2009 image of the Haymarket Martyrs' Monument at the Forest Home Cemetery in Forest Park, Illinois
Workers finish installing Gelert's statue of a Chicago policeman in Haymarket Square, 1889. The statue now stands at the Chicago Police Headquarters.
The statue-less pedestal of the police monument on the 100th anniversary of the Haymarket Affair in May 1986; the pedestal has since been removed.
The marker under the Mary Brogger monument, vandalized

The Haymarket affair (also known as the Haymarket massacre, the Haymarket riot, the Haymarket Square riot, or the Haymarket Incident) was the aftermath of a bombing that took place at a labor demonstration on May 4, 1886, at Haymarket Square in Chicago, Illinois, United States.

Aurora, Illinois

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The Phillips Park 'Sunken Garden'
Downtown Aurora
The Paramount Theatre, downtown Aurora.
Rush–Copley Medical Center
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Aurora is a city in the Chicago metropolitan area located partially in DuPage, Kane, Kendall, and Will counties in the U.S. state of Illinois.

Voyageurs Passing a Waterfall by Frances Anne Hopkins

French Canadians

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Ethnic group who trace their ancestry to French colonists who settled in Canada beginning in the 17th century.

Ethnic group who trace their ancestry to French colonists who settled in Canada beginning in the 17th century.

Voyageurs Passing a Waterfall by Frances Anne Hopkins
Habitants by Cornelius Krieghoff (1852)
Languages in Quebec
Université de Saint-Boniface in Manitoba
Major ethnicities in Canada
Distribution of French Americans in the United States
Distribution of the proportion of French Canadian across Canada.
Distribution of French in the United States
The fleur-de-lis, symbol of French Canada
Quebec stop sign
Québécois
Acadians
Franco-Albertans
Fransaskois
Franco-Columbians
Franco-Manitobans
Franco-Ontarians
Franco-Yukonnais
Franco-Nunavois
Franco-Ténois
Franco-Terreneuviens

During the mid-18th century, French explorers and Canadiens born in French Canada colonized other parts of North America in what are today the states of Louisiana (called Louisianais), Mississippi, Missouri, Illinois, Vincennes, Indiana, Louisville, Kentucky, the Windsor-Detroit region and the Canadian prairies (primarily Southern Manitoba).

Quad Cities

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Map of the "Tri-Cities" in 1919
The John Deere Pavilion in Moline
Downtown Rock Island, Illinois
The Figge Art Museum in Downtown Davenport, Iowa
The new Kone Building in Downtown Moline, Illinois.
The I-74 Bridge, connecting Bettendorf, Iowa, and Moline, Illinois, is located near the geographic center of the Quad Cities. As of May 2021, one span of the pictured bridge is still open to access Moline, Illinois. Other traffic is now redirected onto the new I-74 Bridge.
The I-74 Bridge, connecting Bettendorf, Iowa, and Moline, Illinois, is located near the geographic center of the Quad Cities.

The Quad Cities is a region of cities (originally four, see History) in the U.S. states of Iowa and Illinois: Davenport and Bettendorf in southeastern Iowa, and Rock Island, Moline and East Moline in northwestern Illinois.

Marion County at the time of its creation in 1823

Marion County, Illinois

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Marion County at the time of its creation in 1823

Marion County is a county located in the U.S. state of Illinois.

Colony of Virginia

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The first enduring English colony in North America, following failed proprietary attempts at settlement on Newfoundland by Sir Humphrey Gilbert in 1583, and the subsequent farther south Roanoke Island by Sir Walter Raleigh in the late 1580s.

The first enduring English colony in North America, following failed proprietary attempts at settlement on Newfoundland by Sir Humphrey Gilbert in 1583, and the subsequent farther south Roanoke Island by Sir Walter Raleigh in the late 1580s.

The site of the 1607 Popham Colony is shown by "Po" on the map. The settlement at Jamestown is shown by "J".
The 1609 charter for the Virginia colony "from sea to sea"
Map depicting the Colony of Virginia (according to the Second Charter), made by Willem Blaeu between 1609 and 1638
The Indian massacre of 1622, depicted in a 1628 woodcut by Matthäus Merian out of Theodore de Bry's workshop
Briefe Declaration of 1624
Red line showing the boundary between the Virginia Colony and Tributary Indian tribes, as established by the Treaty of 1646. The Red dot shows Jamestown, the capital of the Virginia Colony.
Lines showing the legal treaty frontiers between the Virginia Colony and Indian Nations in various years, as well as today's state boundaries. Red: Treaty of 1646. Green: Treaty of Albany (1684). Blue: Treaty of Albany (1722). Orange: Proclamation of 1763. Black: Treaty of Camp Charlotte (1774). Area west of this line in present-day Southwest Virginia was ceded by the Cherokee in 1775.
Map of the Iroquois expansion during the Beaver Wars, 1638–1711
Bermuda Hundred and other early English settlements upriver of Jamestown
Hanover County Courthouse (c. 1735–1742), with its arcaded front, is typical of a numerous colonial courthouse built in Virginia.
Rear view of the Wren Building at the College of William and Mary, begun in 1695

The entire modern states of West Virginia, Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, and portions of Ohio and Western Pennsylvania were later created from the territory encompassed, or claimed by, the colony of Virginia at the time of further American independence in July 1776.

Jacob Bunn Sr. (1814–1897). Photograph of Jacob Bunn taken at some point during the middle of the nineteenth century. This photograph, from the Sangamon Valley Collection of the Lincoln Library of Springfield, Illinois, is one of the few known to exist of Jacob Bunn.

John Whitfield Bunn and Jacob Bunn

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American corporate leader, financier, industrialist, and personal friend of Abraham Lincoln, whose work and leadership involved a broad range of institutions ranging from Midwestern railroads, international finance, and Republican Party politics, to corporate consultation, globally significant manufacturing, and the various American stock exchanges.

American corporate leader, financier, industrialist, and personal friend of Abraham Lincoln, whose work and leadership involved a broad range of institutions ranging from Midwestern railroads, international finance, and Republican Party politics, to corporate consultation, globally significant manufacturing, and the various American stock exchanges.

Jacob Bunn Sr. (1814–1897). Photograph of Jacob Bunn taken at some point during the middle of the nineteenth century. This photograph, from the Sangamon Valley Collection of the Lincoln Library of Springfield, Illinois, is one of the few known to exist of Jacob Bunn.

He was of great historical importance in the commercial, civic, political, and industrial development and growth of the state of Illinois and the American Midwest, during both the nineteenth century and the twentieth century.