Illocutionary act

illocutionaryillocutionary forceforceIllocutionary Actsillocutionary forcesillocutionsspeech acts
The concept of illocutionary acts was introduced into linguistics by the philosopher J.wikipedia
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Speech act

speech actsspeech act theoryIndirect speech act
The concept of illocutionary acts was introduced into linguistics by the philosopher J. L. Austin in his investigation of the various aspects of speech acts.
The contemporary use of the term goes back to J. L. Austin's development of performative utterances and his theory of locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary acts.

Performative utterance

performativeperformativesperformative utterances
The notion of an illocutionary act is closely connected with Austin's doctrine of the so-called 'performative' and 'constative utterances': an utterance is "performative" if, and only if it is issued in the course of the "doing of an action" (1975, 5), by which, again, Austin means the performance of an illocutionary act (Austin 1975, 6 n2, 133).
After mentioning several examples of sentences which are not so used, and not truth-evaluable (among them nonsensical sentences, interrogatives, directives and "ethical" propositions), he introduces "performative" sentences or illocutionary act as another instance.

Locutionary act

locutionary
at the dinner table, the illocutionary act is a request: "please give me some salt" even though the locutionary act (the literal sentence) was to ask a question about the presence of salt.
The term equally refers to the surface meaning of an utterance because, according to J. L. Austin's posthumous "How To Do Things With Words", a speech act should be analysed as a locutionary act (i.e. the actual utterance and its ostensible meaning, comprising phonetic, phatic and rhetic acts corresponding to the verbal, syntactic and semantic aspects of any meaningful utterance), as well as an illocutionary act (the semantic 'illocutionary force' of the utterance, thus its real, intended meaning), and in certain cases a further perlocutionary act (i.e. its actual effect, whether intended or not).

Perlocutionary act

perlocutionaryperlocutionary forceperlocutions
The perlocutionary act (the actual effect), might be to cause somebody to pass the salt.
This is contrasted with locutionary and illocutionary acts (which are levels of description, rather than classifications of speech acts).

J. L. Austin

John AustinAustinJohn L. Austin
The concept of illocutionary acts was introduced into linguistics by the philosopher J. L. Austin in his investigation of the various aspects of speech acts.
The action which is performed when a 'performative utterance' is issued belongs to what Austin later calls a speech-act (more particularly, the kind of action Austin has in mind is what he subsequently terms the illocutionary act). For example, if you say "I name this ship the Queen Elizabeth," and the circumstances are appropriate in certain ways, then you will have done something special, namely, you will have performed the act of naming the ship.

William Alston

AlstonAlston, William P.William P. Alston
Alston, William P.. Illocutionary Acts and Sentence Meaning. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 2000
His views on foundationalism, internalism versus externalism, speech acts, and the epistemic value of mystical experience, among many other topics, have been very influential.

John Searle

SearleJohn R. SearleSearle, John
According to a widespread opinion, an adequate and useful account of "illocutionary acts" has been provided by John Searle (e.g., 1969, 1975, 1979).
He attempted to synthesize ideas from many colleagues – including J. L. Austin (the "illocutionary act", from How To Do Things with Words), Ludwig Wittgenstein and G.C.J. Midgley (the distinction between regulative and constitutive rules) – with his own thesis that such acts are constituted by the rules of language.

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
The concept of illocutionary acts was introduced into linguistics by the philosopher J. L. Austin in his investigation of the various aspects of speech acts.

If and only if

iffif, and only ifmaterial equivalence
The notion of an illocutionary act is closely connected with Austin's doctrine of the so-called 'performative' and 'constative utterances': an utterance is "performative" if, and only if it is issued in the course of the "doing of an action" (1975, 5), by which, again, Austin means the performance of an illocutionary act (Austin 1975, 6 n2, 133).

Proposition

propositionspropositionalclaim
assertives = speech acts that commit a speaker to the truth of the expressed proposition

Question

answerwh-questionquestions
Questions can thus be understood as a kind of illocutionary act in the field of pragmatics or as special kinds of propositions in frameworks of formal semantics such as alternative semantics or inquisitive semantics.

Linguistic modality

modalitymodalmodalities
Sometimes, the term mood is used to refer to both mood and modality, however, the two can be distinguished according to whether they refer to the grammatical expressions of various modalities (mood) or the meanings so expressed (modality). Modality can also be considered equivalent to the idea of illocutionary force if the kinds of expressions which can express modal meanings also include lexical items such as performative verbs.

Limited Inc

The first essay, "Signature Event Context," is about J. L. Austin's theory of the illocutionary act outlined in his How To Do Things With Words.

Coordinated management of meaning

Barnett PearceCMM
Though the speech act theory is much more detailed, it is important to have an understanding of both illocutionary and perlocutionary utterances.

Freedom of speech in the United States

freedom of speechfree speechtime, place, and manner
Examples include creating or destroying an object when performed as a statement (such as flag burning in a political protest), silent marches and parades intended to convey a message, clothing bearing meaningful symbols (such as anti-war armbands), body language, messages written in code, ideas and structures embodied as computer code ("software"), mathematical and scientific formulae, and illocutionary acts that convey by implication an attitude, request, or opinion.

Grammatical aspect

aspectaspectualaspects
But they can have other illocutionary forces or additional modal components:

Pragmatics

pragmaticpragmaticallylinguistic pragmatics
Speech Act Theory's examination of Illocutionary Acts has many of the same goals as pragmatics, as outlined above.

Direction of fit

directions of fitword and worldword–world relations
Searle used this notion of "direction of fit" to create a taxonomy of illocutionary acts.

Metalocutionary act

The term metalocutionary act originated as metalocution (Gibbon 1976, 1983) in functional descriptions of intonation in English and German, by analogy with locution (locutionary act), illocution (illocutionary act) and perlocution (perlocutionary act) in speech act theory.

Universal pragmatics

(1979:34) Central to the notion of speech acts are the ideas of illocutionary force and perlocutionary force, both terms coined by philosopher J.L. Austin.

Thai honorifics

SriThaoroyal language
3) Illocutionary force: affirmative, imperative, interrogative

Communicative language teaching

communicative approachcommunicativecommunicative approaches
A survey of communicative competence by Bachman (1990) divides competency into the broad headings of "organizational competence", which includes both grammatical and discourse (or textual) competence, and "pragmatic competence", which includes both sociolinguistic and "illocutionary" competence.

Meaning (philosophy of language)

meaningtheory of meaningmeanings
He analysed the structure of utterances into three distinct parts: locutions, illocutions and perlocutions.