Illuminati

Bavarian IlluminatiThe IlluminatiOrder of the IlluminatiOrder of IlluminatiIlluminatusBavarian Order of IlluminatiIlluminatenordenIlluminati conspiracy theoriesIlluminati OrderillumiNATTI
The Illuminati (plural of Latin illuminatus, "enlightened") is a name given to several groups, both real and fictitious.wikipedia
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Adam Weishaupt

Johann Adam WeishauptWeishauptSpartacus-Weishaupt
Adam Weishaupt (1748–1830) became professor of Canon Law and practical philosophy at the University of Ingolstadt in 1773.
Johann Adam Weishaupt (, 6 February 1748 – 18 November 1830) was a German philosopher, professor, and founder of the Order of the Illuminati, a secret society.

New World Order (conspiracy theory)

New World OrderIlluminaticonspiracy
These organisations have often been alleged to conspire to control world affairs, by masterminding events and planting agents in government and corporations, in order to gain political power and influence and to establish a New World Order.
During the Second Red Scare, both secular and religious right American agitators, largely influenced by the work of Canadian conspiracy theorist William Guy Carr, increasingly embraced and spread dubious fears of Freemasons, Illuminati and Jews as the alleged driving forces behind an "international communist conspiracy".

Charles Theodore, Elector of Bavaria

Karl TheodorCharles TheodoreKarl IV Philipp Theodor
The Illuminati—along with Freemasonry and other secret societies—were outlawed through edict by the Bavarian ruler Charles Theodore with the encouragement of the Catholic Church, in 1784, 1785, 1787, and 1790.
Charles Theodore is also known for disbanding Adam Weishaupt's order of the Illuminati in 1785.

University of Ingolstadt

IngolstadtIngolstadt UniversityUniversity of Landshut
Adam Weishaupt (1748–1830) became professor of Canon Law and practical philosophy at the University of Ingolstadt in 1773.
The Illuminati movement was founded on May 1, 1776, in Ingolstadt (Upper Bavaria), by Jesuit-taught Adam Weishaupt (d.

Adolph Freiherr Knigge

Adolph KniggeFreiherr Adolph KniggeKnigge
The recruiting drive amongst the Frankfurt masons also obtained the allegiance of Adolph Freiherr Knigge.
Freiherr Adolph Franz Friedrich Ludwig Knigge (16 October 1752 – 6 May 1796) was a German writer, Freemason, and a leading member of the Order of the Illuminati.

Freemasonry

FreemasonFreemasonsMasonic
The Illuminati—along with Freemasonry and other secret societies—were outlawed through edict by the Bavarian ruler Charles Theodore with the encouragement of the Catholic Church, in 1784, 1785, 1787, and 1790.
Conspiracy theorists have long associated Freemasonry with the New World Order and the Illuminati, and state that Freemasonry as an organisation is either bent on world domination or already secretly in control of world politics.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

GoetheJohann Wolfgang GoetheJohann von Goethe
It attracted literary men such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Johann Gottfried Herder and the reigning dukes of Gotha and Weimar.
Goethe was a Freemason, joining the lodge Amalia in Weimar in 1780, and frequently alluded to Masonic themes of universal brotherhood in his work, he was also attracted to the Bavarian Illuminati a secret society founded on 1 May 1776.

Joseph von Sonnenfels

SonnenfelsJoseph Sonnenfels
The Rosicrucians spied on Joseph von Sonnenfels and other suspected Illuminati, and their campaign of denunciation within Freemasonry completely shut down Illuminati recruitment in Tyrol.
He was among the leaders of the Illuminati movement in Austria, and a close friend and patron of Mozart.

Augustin Barruel

Abbé BarruelAbbe BarruelBarruel
Between 1797 and 1798, Augustin Barruel's Memoirs Illustrating the History of Jacobinism and John Robison's Proofs of a Conspiracy publicised the theory that the Illuminati had survived and represented an ongoing international conspiracy.
He is now mostly known for setting forth the conspiracy theory involving the Bavarian Illuminati and the Jacobins in his book Memoirs Illustrating the History of Jacobinism (original title Mémoires pour servir à l'Histoire du Jacobinisme) published in 1797.

Age of Enlightenment

Enlightenmentthe EnlightenmentFrench Enlightenment
Historically, the name usually refers to the Bavarian Illuminati, an Enlightenment-era secret society founded on 1 May 1776.
One example was the Illuminati founded in Bavaria in 1776, which was copied after the Freemasons, but was never part of the movement.

Martinism

MartinistMartinist OrderMartinists
Ostensibly a discussion of the future of the order, the 35 delegates knew that the Strict Observance in its current form was doomed, and that the Convent of Wilhelmsbad would be a struggle over the pieces between the German mystics, under Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and their host Prince Charles of Hesse-Kassel, and the Martinists, under Jean-Baptiste Willermoz.
Having reformed the French branch of the order, Willermoz in 1782 succeeded in persuading the German mother branch to adopt his reforms – though not without meeting considerable opposition from other branches of the Strict Observance, such as the Bavarian Illuminati of Adam Weishaupt.

John Robison (physicist)

John RobisonProfessor John RobisonProf. John Robison
Between 1797 and 1798, Augustin Barruel's Memoirs Illustrating the History of Jacobinism and John Robison's Proofs of a Conspiracy publicised the theory that the Illuminati had survived and represented an ongoing international conspiracy.
He authored Proofs of a Conspiracy in 1797—a polemic accusing Freemasonry of being infiltrated by Weishaupt's Order of the Illuminati.

Johann Joachim Christoph Bode

C. J. BodeJohann Christoph Bode
The only dissenting voices to mystical higher grades were Johann Joachim Christoph Bode, who was horrified by Martinism, but whose proposed alternatives were as yet unformed, and Franz Dietrich von Ditfurth, a judge from Wetzlar and master of the Joseph of the Three Helmets lodge there, who was already a member of the Illuminati.
He met Adolph Knigge, a member of Illuminati, which he joined, acquiring the rank of Major illumitatus in January 1783.

Ernest II, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg

Ernest IIErnst IIErnest II of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg
Karl August, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, Ernest II, Duke of Saxe-Gotha-Altenburg with his brother and later successor August, Karl Theodor Anton Maria von Dalberg governor of Erfurt, Duke Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (already mentioned), his chief assistant in masonic matters, Johann Friedrich von Schwarz, and Count Metternich of Koblenz were all enrolled.
In 1783, he became a member of the Bavarian Illuminati under the name of Quintus Severus and/or Timoleon, and in 1784, he was made Supervisor of Abessinien (a name for Upper Saxony).

Mark Dice

Conspiracy theorists and writers such as Mark Dice have argued that the Illuminati have survived to this day.
As the founder of The Resistance, Dice told KFSN-TV of his group's intention to disrupt theater showings of 2009's Angels & Demons because the film "is a fraud, aimed at covering up the existence of a secret society called the Illuminati."

Memoirs Illustrating the History of Jacobinism

Between 1797 and 1798, Augustin Barruel's Memoirs Illustrating the History of Jacobinism and John Robison's Proofs of a Conspiracy publicised the theory that the Illuminati had survived and represented an ongoing international conspiracy.
Barruels third volume addresses the antisocial conspiracy that was the objective of the Freemasons and the Order of the Illuminati.

Jedidiah Morse

Jedediah MorseRev. Jedidiah MorseRev. Jedidiah Morse, D. D.
The Rev. Jedidiah Morse, an orthodox Congregational minister and geographer, was among those who delivered sermons against the Illuminati.
Morse is also known for his part in the Illuminati conspiracy theory in New England 1798–99.

Secret society

secret societiessecret organizationsecret
Historically, the name usually refers to the Bavarian Illuminati, an Enlightenment-era secret society founded on 1 May 1776.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
The Illuminati (plural of Latin illuminatus, "enlightened") is a name given to several groups, both real and fictitious.

Superstition

superstitioussuperstitionsbad luck
The society's goals were to oppose superstition, obscurantism, religious influence over public life, and abuses of state power.

Obscurantism

obscurantistobscurantistsobscure
The society's goals were to oppose superstition, obscurantism, religious influence over public life, and abuses of state power.

Edict

edictsdictatedirective
The Illuminati—along with Freemasonry and other secret societies—were outlawed through edict by the Bavarian ruler Charles Theodore with the encouragement of the Catholic Church, in 1784, 1785, 1787, and 1790.

Catholic Church

Roman CatholicCatholicRoman Catholic Church
The Illuminati—along with Freemasonry and other secret societies—were outlawed through edict by the Bavarian ruler Charles Theodore with the encouragement of the Catholic Church, in 1784, 1785, 1787, and 1790.

French Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary FranceRevolutionary
In the following several years, the group was vilified by conservative and religious critics who claimed that they continued underground and were responsible for the French Revolution.

Johann Gottfried Herder

HerderJohann Gottfried von HerderJohann Herder
It attracted literary men such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Johann Gottfried Herder and the reigning dukes of Gotha and Weimar.