Immigration to the United States

immigrationimmigrantsimmigrantimmigrated to the United Statesimmigratedimmigrants to the United Statesemigratedemigrated to the United StatesAmerican immigrationUnited States
Immigration to the United States is the international movement of non-U.S.wikipedia
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Americans

AmericanAmericaUnited States
Because the United States is a settler colonial society, all Americans, with the exception of the small percentage of Native Americans, can trace their ancestry to immigrants from other nations around the world.
The majority of Americans or their ancestors immigrated to America or are descended from people who were brought as slaves within the past five centuries, with the exception of the Native American population and people from Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippine Islands, who became American through expansion of the country in the 19th century, additionally America expanded into American Samoa, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Northern Mariana Islands in the 20th century.

Asian immigration to the United States

Asian American immigration historyHistory of Asian American immigrationAsia
In the late 1800s, [[Asian immigration to the United States#First major wave of Asian immigration (1850s-1917)|immigration from other Asian countries]], especially to the West Coast, became more common.
Asian immigration to the United States refers to immigration to the United States from part of the continent of Asia, which includes East Asia, Southeast Asia, and South Asia.

National Origins Formula

National Origins quota
Between 1921 and 1965, policies such as the national origins formula limited immigration and naturalization opportunities for people from areas outside Western Europe.
The National Origins Formula was an American system of immigration quotas, used between 1921 and 1965, which restricted immigration on the basis of existing proportions of the population.

Immigration

immigrantimmigrantsimmigrated
Immigration has been a major source of population growth and cultural change throughout much of the U.S. history.
The largest number of international migrants live in the United States, with 19% of the world's total.

History of laws concerning immigration and naturalization in the United States

immigration reformU.S. Commission on Immigration Reformcomprehensive immigration reform
Appointed by Bill Clinton, the [[History of laws concerning immigration and naturalization in the United States#1990s|U.S. Commission on Immigration Reform]] recommended reducing legal immigration from about 800,000 people per year to approximately 550,000.
This is the history of laws concerning immigration and naturalization in the United States.

Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965

Immigration and Nationality ActImmigration Act of 19651965 Immigration Act
The civil rights movement led to the replacement of these ethnic quotas with per-country limits for family-sponsored and employment-based preference visas.
The law abolished the National Origins Formula, which had been the basis of U.S. immigration policy since the 1920s.

Immigration to Canada

immigrationimmigrantsCanadian immigration
Some other countries have larger proportions of immigrants, such as Switzerland with 24.9% and Canada with 21.9%.
Consequently, immigration levels to Canada (roughly 0.7% per year) are considerably higher per capita than to the United States (about a million, or 0.3%, per year).

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
More than 80 cities in the United States, including Washington D.C., New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, San Diego, San Jose, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, Detroit, Jersey City, Minneapolis, Denver, Baltimore, Seattle, Portland, Oregon and Portland, Maine, have sanctuary policies, which vary locally.
The city and its metropolitan area constitute the premier gateway for legal immigration to the United States.

Page Act of 1875

Page ActPage Law
In 1875, the nation passed its first immigration law, the Page Act of 1875.
The law technically barred immigrants considered "undesirable," defining this as a person from East Asia who was coming to the United States to be a forced laborer, any East Asian woman who would engage in prostitution, and all people considered to be convicts in their own country.

Crime in the United States

crimecrimescriminal justice in the United States
The economic, social, and political aspects of immigration have caused controversy regarding such issues as maintaining ethnic homogeneity, workers for employers versus jobs for non-immigrants, settlement patterns, impact on upward social mobility, crime, and voting behavior.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
Contemporary immigrants settle predominantly in seven states, California, New York, Florida, Texas, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Illinois, comprising about 44% of the U.S. population as a whole.
With an estimated population of 8.62 million in 2017, New York City is the most populous city in the United States and the premier gateway for legal immigration to the United States.

Chicago

Chicago, IllinoisChicago, ILCity of Chicago
More than 80 cities in the United States, including Washington D.C., New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, San Diego, San Jose, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, Detroit, Jersey City, Minneapolis, Denver, Baltimore, Seattle, Portland, Oregon and Portland, Maine, have sanctuary policies, which vary locally.
A flourishing economy brought residents from rural communities and immigrants from abroad.

Jersey City, New Jersey

Jersey CityJersey City, NJJersey
More than 80 cities in the United States, including Washington D.C., New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, San Diego, San Jose, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, Detroit, Jersey City, Minneapolis, Denver, Baltimore, Seattle, Portland, Oregon and Portland, Maine, have sanctuary policies, which vary locally.
Tens of millions of immigrants passed through these stations as they made their way westward from Ellis Island into the United States.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
More than 80 cities in the United States, including Washington D.C., New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, San Diego, San Jose, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, Dallas, Fort Worth, Houston, Detroit, Jersey City, Minneapolis, Denver, Baltimore, Seattle, Portland, Oregon and Portland, Maine, have sanctuary policies, which vary locally.
The suburbs experienced rapid growth, and San Francisco underwent significant demographic change, as large segments of the white population left the city, supplanted by an increasing wave of immigration from Asia and Latin America.

Demography of the United States

Demographics of the United StatesDemographicsAmerican
By equalizing immigration policies, the act resulted in new immigration from non-European nations, which changed the ethnic make-up of the United States.
It is further projected that 82% of the increase in population from 2005 to 2050 will be due to immigrants and their children.

Pennsylvania

PACommonwealth of PennsylvaniaPa.
Contemporary immigrants settle predominantly in seven states, California, New York, Florida, Texas, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Illinois, comprising about 44% of the U.S. population as a whole.
Net migration to other states resulted in a decrease of 27,718, and immigration from other countries resulted in an increase of 127,007.

Melting pot

melting-potcommon or universal cultureThe Melting Pot
This has caused questioning of the correctness of describing the United States as a melting pot.
Historically, it is often used to describe the cultural integration of immigrants to the United States.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
Contemporary immigrants settle predominantly in seven states, California, New York, Florida, Texas, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Illinois, comprising about 44% of the U.S. population as a whole.
During this time period, international migration produced a net increase of 1,816,633 people while domestic migration produced a net decrease of 1,509,708, resulting in a net in-migration of 306,925 people.

Ireland

IrishIRLisland of Ireland
By the end of the decade, half of all immigration to the United States was from Ireland.

Immigration Act of 1924

1924Asian Exclusion ActImmigration Act
The Emergency Quota Act was enacted in 1921, followed by the Immigration Act of 1924.
The immigration act made permanent the basic limitations on immigration into the United States established in 1921 and modified the National Origins Formula established then.

Hispanic Americans

HispanicHispanic or LatinoLatino
It also foresees the Hispanic population rising from 17% in 2014 to 29% by 2060.
During the 20th and 21st centuries, Hispanic and Latino immigration to the United States increased markedly following changes to the immigration law in 1965.

Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act

Nicaraguan and Central American Relief ActNACARA
The remaining 0.4% included small numbers from several other categories, including 0.2% who were granted suspension of deportation as an immediate relative of a citizen (Z13); persons admitted under the Nicaraguan and Central American Relief Act; children born subsequent to the issuance of a parent's visa; and certain parolees from the former Soviet Union, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam who were denied refugee status.
The Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act or NACARA (Title II of ) is a U.S. law passed in 1997 that provides various forms of immigration benefits and relief from deportation to certain Nicaraguans, Cubans, Salvadorans, Guatemalans, nationals of former Soviet bloc countries and their dependents who had arrived as asylees.

African immigration to the United States

Sub-Saharan AfricanAfricanAfrican immigrants
There has also been an increase in violence between non-Hispanic whites and Latino immigrants, and between African immigrants and African Americans.
African immigration to the United States refers to immigrants to the United States who are or were nationals of modern African countries.

Economy of the United States

U.S. economyeconomyAmerican economy
According to James Smith, a senior economist at Santa Monica-based RAND Corporation and lead author of the United States National Research Council's study "The New Americans: Economic, Demographic, and Fiscal Effects of Immigration", immigrants contribute as much as $10 billion to the U.S. economy each year.
The nation's labor market has attracted immigrants from all over the world and its net migration rate is among the highest in the world.

George H. W. Bush

George H.W. BushBushGeorge Bush
In 1990, George H. W. Bush signed the Immigration Act of 1990, which increased legal immigration to the United States by 40%.
Bush signed the Immigration Act of 1990, which led to a 40 percent increase in legal immigration to the United States.