Immunization

immunisationimmunizationsimmunizeimmunizedimmunisationspassive immunisationchildren's immunizationimmuneimmunisedimmunizer
Immunization, or immunisation, is the process by which an individual's immune system becomes fortified against an agent (known as the immunogen).wikipedia
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Vaccination

vaccinationsvaccinatedvaccinating
Immunization is done through various techniques, most commonly vaccination.
Stimulating immune responses with an infectious agent is known as immunization.

Inoculation

inoculuminoculatedinoculate
Before the introduction of vaccines, people could only become immune to an infectious disease by contracting the disease and surviving it. Smallpox (variola) was prevented in this way by inoculation, which produced a milder effect than the natural disease.
The terms inoculation, vaccination, and immunization are often used synonymously to refer to artificial induction of immunity against various infectious diseases.

Immune system

immuneimmune responseimmune responses
Immunization, or immunisation, is the process by which an individual's immune system becomes fortified against an agent (known as the immunogen).
The principle behind vaccination (also called immunization) is to introduce an antigen from a pathogen in order to stimulate the immune system and develop specific immunity against that particular pathogen without causing disease associated with that organism.

Adaptive immune system

adaptive immunityadaptive immune responseadaptive
This is a function of the adaptive immune system.
Over the last century, two important factors have been developed to combat their spread: sanitation and immunization.

Immunological memory

immunological
When this system is exposed to molecules that are foreign to the body, called non-self, it will orchestrate an immune response, and it will also develop the ability to quickly respond to a subsequent encounter because of immunological memory.
Both populations of these memory cells originate from naive T cells and remain in the body for several years after initial immunization.

Tetanus

lockjawanti-tetanuslock jaw
Artificial passive immunization is normally administered by injection and is used if there has been a recent outbreak of a particular disease or as an emergency treatment for toxicity, as in for tetanus.
Tetanus can be prevented by immunization with the tetanus vaccine.

Injection (medicine)

injectioninjecteddepot
Artificial passive immunization is normally administered by injection and is used if there has been a recent outbreak of a particular disease or as an emergency treatment for toxicity, as in for tetanus.
95% of injections are administered in curative care, 3% are for immunization, and the rest for other purposes, such as blood transfusions.

Targeted immunization strategies

targeted immunization
Targeted immunization strategies
Targeted immunization strategies are approaches designed to increase the immunization level of populations and decrease the chances of epidemic outbreaks.

Immunization registry

immunization records
Immunization registry
It consolidates the immunization records from multiple sources for each person living in its jurisdiction.

Rubella

German measlesdisease of the same namematernal rubella
Examples of live, attenuated vaccines include measles, mumps, rubella, MMR, yellow fever, varicella, rotavirus, and influenza (LAIV).
Rubella infections are prevented by active immunisation programs using live attenuated virus vaccines.

Cell culture

cultureculturedcell cultures
Thus, humanized antibodies produced in vitro by cell culture are used instead if available.
In brief, lymphocytes isolated from the spleen (or possibly blood) of an immunised animal are combined with an immortal myeloma cell line (B cell lineage) to produce a hybridoma which has the antibody specificity of the primary lymphocyte and the immortality of the myeloma.

Influenza vaccine

flu vaccineinfluenzainfluenza vaccination
Influenza vaccine
One promising approach is using broadly neutralizing antibodies that unlike the vaccine used today, which provoke the body to generate an immune response, instead provide a component of the immune response itself.

Antigen

antigensantigenicantigenic proteins
Immunization, or immunisation, is the process by which an individual's immune system becomes fortified against an agent (known as the immunogen).

Molecule

moleculesmolecularmolecular structure
When this system is exposed to molecules that are foreign to the body, called non-self, it will orchestrate an immune response, and it will also develop the ability to quickly respond to a subsequent encounter because of immunological memory.

T cell

TT lymphocytesT-cells
The most important elements of the immune system that are improved by immunization are the T cells, B cells, and the antibodies B cells produce.

B cell

BB lymphocytesB-cell
The most important elements of the immune system that are improved by immunization are the T cells, B cells, and the antibodies B cells produce.

Memory B cell

memory B cellsmemory cellsmemory cell
Memory B cells and memory T cells are responsible for a swift response to a second encounter with a foreign molecule.

Memory T cell

memory T cellsmemory Tmemory T lymphocytes
Memory B cells and memory T cells are responsible for a swift response to a second encounter with a foreign molecule.

Passive immunity

maternal antibodiespassive immunizationimmunization, passive
Passive immunization is direct introduction of these elements into the body, instead of production of these elements by the body itself.

Microorganism

microorganismsmicrobemicrobes
Vaccines against microorganisms that cause diseases can prepare the body's immune system, thus helping to fight or prevent an infection.

Disease

morbidityillnessdiseases
Vaccines against microorganisms that cause diseases can prepare the body's immune system, thus helping to fight or prevent an infection.

Infection

infectious diseaseinfectious diseasesinfectious
Vaccines against microorganisms that cause diseases can prepare the body's immune system, thus helping to fight or prevent an infection.

Mutation

mutationsgenetic mutationmutated
The fact that mutations can cause cancer cells to produce proteins or other molecules that are known to the body forms the theoretical basis for therapeutic cancer vaccines.

Cancer

cancersmalignanciescancerous
The fact that mutations can cause cancer cells to produce proteins or other molecules that are known to the body forms the theoretical basis for therapeutic cancer vaccines.

Cell (biology)

cellcellscellular
The fact that mutations can cause cancer cells to produce proteins or other molecules that are known to the body forms the theoretical basis for therapeutic cancer vaccines.