Impeachment of Bill Clinton

impeachmentimpeachment trialClinton impeachmentimpeachment proceedingsClinton's impeachmentimpeachedimpeachment of President Clintonimpeachment of President Bill ClintonBill Clinton's impeachmentClinton impeachment trial
The impeachment of Bill Clinton was initiated on October 8, 1998, when the United States House of Representatives voted to commence impeachment proceedings against Bill Clinton, the 42nd president of the United States, for "high crimes and misdemeanors".wikipedia
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Bill Clinton

ClintonPresident ClintonPresident Bill Clinton
The impeachment of Bill Clinton was initiated on October 8, 1998, when the United States House of Representatives voted to commence impeachment proceedings against Bill Clinton, the 42nd president of the United States, for "high crimes and misdemeanors".
In 1998, Clinton was impeached by the House of Representatives.

Monica Lewinsky

LewinskyMonicacigar incident
The charges stemmed from a sexual harassment lawsuit filed against Clinton by Paula Jones and from Clinton's testimony denying that he had engaged in a sexual relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky.
The affair and its repercussions (which included Clinton's impeachment) became known later as the Clinton–Lewinsky scandal.

Paula Jones

Jones v. ClintonPaula Corbin JonesPaula Jones case
The charges stemmed from a sexual harassment lawsuit filed against Clinton by Paula Jones and from Clinton's testimony denying that he had engaged in a sexual relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky.
The Paula Jones case provided the impetus for Independent Counsel Ken Starr to broaden his on-going investigation into Clinton's pre-presidency financial dealings with the Whitewater Land Company, and resulted in Clinton's impeachment in the House of Representatives and subsequent acquittal by the Senate on February 12, 1999.

Ken Starr

Kenneth StarrKenneth W. StarrStarr
The catalyst for the president's impeachment was the Starr Report, a September 1998 report prepared by Independent Counsel Ken Starr for the House Judiciary Committee.
The allegation led to the impeachment of Bill Clinton and the five-year suspension of Clinton's law license.

Starr Report

final reportStarr's Reportthe Independent Counsel
The catalyst for the president's impeachment was the Starr Report, a September 1998 report prepared by Independent Counsel Ken Starr for the House Judiciary Committee.
Delivered to the United States Congress on September 9, 1998, the allegations in the report led to the impeachment of Bill Clinton and the five-year suspension of Clinton's law license.

William Rehnquist

William H. RehnquistRehnquistChief Justice Rehnquist
A trial in the Senate began in January 1999, with Chief Justice William Rehnquist presiding.
As Chief Justice, Rehnquist presided over the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton.

105th United States Congress

105th105th Congress105
Impeachment proceedings were held during the post-election, "lame duck" session of the outgoing 105th United States Congress.
President Clinton was impeached by the US House of Representatives of the 105th Congress.

United States House Committee on the Judiciary

House Judiciary CommitteeClaimsHouse Judiciary
The catalyst for the president's impeachment was the Starr Report, a September 1998 report prepared by Independent Counsel Ken Starr for the House Judiciary Committee.
This committee approved articles of impeachment against Presidents in three instances: the impeachment of Andrew Johnson (1868), the impeachment process against Richard Nixon (1974), and the impeachment of Bill Clinton (1998).

Impeachment process against Richard Nixon

impeachmentimpeachment proceedingsStennis Compromise
Unlike the case of the 1974 impeachment process against Richard Nixon, the committee hearings were perfunctory but the floor debate in the whole House was spirited on both sides.
The other three are: Andrew Johnson (in 1868) and Bill Clinton (in 1998), who were impeached but later acquitted after trials in the Senate, and Donald Trump (in 2019), who is the subject of an ongoing impeachment inquiry.

Bob Barr

Political positions of Bob Barr*Robert Barr[Bob] Barr
Thirteen House Republicans from the Judiciary Committee served as "managers", the equivalent of prosecutors: Henry Hyde (chairman), Jim Sensenbrenner, Bill McCollum, George Gekas, Charles Canady, Steve Buyer, Ed Bryant, Steve Chabot, Bob Barr, Asa Hutchinson, Chris Cannon, James E. Rogan and Lindsey Graham.
Barr attained national prominence as one of the leaders of the impeachment of President Bill Clinton.

Bill McCollum

Bill McCollum Jr.Ira William "Bill" McCollum, Jr.McCollum
Thirteen House Republicans from the Judiciary Committee served as "managers", the equivalent of prosecutors: Henry Hyde (chairman), Jim Sensenbrenner, Bill McCollum, George Gekas, Charles Canady, Steve Buyer, Ed Bryant, Steve Chabot, Bob Barr, Asa Hutchinson, Chris Cannon, James E. Rogan and Lindsey Graham.
He voted to impeach President Bill Clinton and subsequently took a leadership role in managing Clinton's trial in the Senate, which ended in acquittal.

Cheryl Mills

Cheryl D. Mills
Clinton was defended by Cheryl Mills.
She first came into public prominence while serving as deputy White House Counsel for President Bill Clinton, whom she defended during his 1999 impeachment trial.

Charles Ruff

Charles F.C. RuffChuck Ruff
Clinton's counsel staff included Charles Ruff, David E. Kendall, Dale Bumpers, Bruce Lindsey, Nicole Seligman, Lanny A. Breuer and Gregory B. Craig.
Charles Frederick Carson Ruff (August 1, 1939 – November 19, 2000) was a prominent American lawyer based in Washington, D.C., and was best known as the White House Counsel who defended President Bill Clinton during his impeachment trial in 1999.

Gregory B. Craig

Greg CraigGregory Craig
Clinton's counsel staff included Charles Ruff, David E. Kendall, Dale Bumpers, Bruce Lindsey, Nicole Seligman, Lanny A. Breuer and Gregory B. Craig.
Prior to becoming White House Counsel, Craig served as assistant to the President and special counsel in the White House of President Bill Clinton, where he directed the team defending Clinton against impeachment.

Obstruction of justice

obstructing justiceobstructionobstruct justice
The specific charges against Clinton were lying under oath and obstruction of justice.

Jim Sensenbrenner

James SensenbrennerF. James Sensenbrenner, Jr.F. James Sensenbrenner
Thirteen House Republicans from the Judiciary Committee served as "managers", the equivalent of prosecutors: Henry Hyde (chairman), Jim Sensenbrenner, Bill McCollum, George Gekas, Charles Canady, Steve Buyer, Ed Bryant, Steve Chabot, Bob Barr, Asa Hutchinson, Chris Cannon, James E. Rogan and Lindsey Graham.
In 1998, Sensenbrenner was one of the acting House managers in the impeachment of U.S. President Bill Clinton.

Virgil Goode

Virgil H. Goode Jr.Virgil H. Goode, Jr.Goode, Virgil
Five Democrats (Virgil Goode, Ralph Hall, Paul McHale, Charles Stenholm and Gene Taylor) voted in favor of three of the four articles of impeachment, but only Taylor voted for the abuse of power charge.
Goode came under considerable fire shortly after being unopposed for a second term in 1998, when he voted for three of the four articles of impeachment against Bill Clinton.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
The impeachment of Bill Clinton was initiated on October 8, 1998, when the United States House of Representatives voted to commence impeachment proceedings against Bill Clinton, the 42nd president of the United States, for "high crimes and misdemeanors".
Two presidents have been impeached by the House of Representatives: Andrew Johnson in 1868, and Bill Clinton in 1998.

Lindsey Graham

Lindsey O. GrahamSenator Lindsey GrahamGraham
Thirteen House Republicans from the Judiciary Committee served as "managers", the equivalent of prosecutors: Henry Hyde (chairman), Jim Sensenbrenner, Bill McCollum, George Gekas, Charles Canady, Steve Buyer, Ed Bryant, Steve Chabot, Bob Barr, Asa Hutchinson, Chris Cannon, James E. Rogan and Lindsey Graham.
He was a member of the Judiciary Committee during the impeachment of President Bill Clinton in 1998.

Gene Taylor (Mississippi politician)

Gene TaylorGene Taylor, US RepresentativeTaylor, Gene
Five Democrats (Virgil Goode, Ralph Hall, Paul McHale, Charles Stenholm and Gene Taylor) voted in favor of three of the four articles of impeachment, but only Taylor voted for the abuse of power charge.
He voted for all four articles of impeachment against Bill Clinton in 1998—the only Democrat in Congress to do so.

Henry Hyde

Henry J. HydeHenry John HydeRep Hyde, Henry J. [IL-6
Thirteen House Republicans from the Judiciary Committee served as "managers", the equivalent of prosecutors: Henry Hyde (chairman), Jim Sensenbrenner, Bill McCollum, George Gekas, Charles Canady, Steve Buyer, Ed Bryant, Steve Chabot, Bob Barr, Asa Hutchinson, Chris Cannon, James E. Rogan and Lindsey Graham. Many other prominent Republican members of Congress (including Dan Burton, Helen Chenoweth, and Henry Hyde, the chief House manager of Clinton's trial in the Senate) had infidelities exposed about this time, all of whom voted for impeachment.
He was its chairman from 1995 until 2001, during which time he served as the lead House "manager" during the President Clinton impeachment trial.

Perjury

perjuredfalse testimonyperjurer
The specific charges against Clinton were lying under oath and obstruction of justice.

David E. Kendall

David Kendall
Clinton's counsel staff included Charles Ruff, David E. Kendall, Dale Bumpers, Bruce Lindsey, Nicole Seligman, Lanny A. Breuer and Gregory B. Craig.
He is known for his roles in the Coker v. Georgia, Gilmore v. Utah, and other death penalty cases; in the copyright and contract cases of MGM Studios v. Grokster and Tasini v. AOL ; as well as in various First Amendment cases, including for The Washington Post. In addition, he is known for having advised President Bill Clinton during the Lewinsky scandal, and representing him during his impeachment trial.

Nancy Johnson

Nancy L. JohnsonNancy Johnson (politician)
Eight more Republicans (Sherwood Boehlert, Michael Castle, Phil English, Nancy Johnson, Jay Kim, Jim Leach, John McHugh and Ralph Regula), but not Souder, voted against the obstruction charge.
In 1998, Johnson voted for two of the four articles of impeachment then-President Bill Clinton—the only member of the Connecticut delegation to support Clinton's impeachment.

Charles T. Canady

Charles CanadyJudge Charles Canady
Thirteen House Republicans from the Judiciary Committee served as "managers", the equivalent of prosecutors: Henry Hyde (chairman), Jim Sensenbrenner, Bill McCollum, George Gekas, Charles Canady, Steve Buyer, Ed Bryant, Steve Chabot, Bob Barr, Asa Hutchinson, Chris Cannon, James E. Rogan and Lindsey Graham.
He was one of the managers appointed to conduct the impeachment proceedings of President Bill Clinton.