Imperative mood

imperativeimperativesprohibitivecommandsimperative verbcommandimp.prohibitive moodimperative formimperative sentence
The imperative mood is a grammatical mood that forms a command or request.wikipedia
459 Related Articles

Grammatical mood

moodmoodsindicative
The imperative mood is a grammatical mood that forms a command or request.
Some examples of moods are indicative, interrogative, imperative, subjunctive, injunctive, optative, and potential.

Jussive mood

jussivejussives
Such imperatives imply a second-person subject (you), but some other languages also have first- and third-person imperatives, with the meaning of "let's (do something)" or "let him/her/them (do something)" (the forms may alternatively be called cohortative and jussive).
The mood is similar to the cohortative mood, which typically applies to the first person by appeal to the object's duties and obligations, and the imperative, which applies to the second (by command).

Verb

verbssubject-verb agreementv.
An example of a verb used in the imperative mood is the English sentence "Leave!"
If the verbal expression of modality involves inflection, we have the special case of mood; moods include the indicative (as in "I am there"), the subjunctive (as in "I wish I were there"), and the imperative ("Be there!").

Irrealis mood

irrealispotential moodpotential
It is one of the irrealis moods.

English subjunctive

subjunctiveFuture subjunctivesubjunctive mood
A present subjunctive verb form is sometimes found in a main clause, with the force of a wish or a third person imperative (and such forms can alternatively be analyzed as imperatives).

English verbs

English-edEnglish verb
Imperatives are expressed with the base form of the verb, normally with no subject: ''Take this outside!

List of glossing abbreviations

abbreviatedglossing abbreviationglossing abbreviations
Imperative mood can be denoted by the glossing abbreviation.

English grammar

Englishgrammarthere is
An example of a verb used in the imperative mood is the English sentence "Leave!"
The second-person imperative is identical to the (basic) infinitive; other imperative forms may be made with let (let us go, or let's go; let them eat cake).

Infinitive

infinitivesinfinitivalto''-infinitive
plural), from the infinitive amāre ("to love"); similarly monē and monēte from monēre ("to advise/warn"); audī and audīte from audīre ("to hear"), etc. The negative imperative is formed with the infinitive of the verb, preceded by the imperative of nōlle ("to not want"): nōlī stāre ("don't stand", 2nd pers.
Moreover, the unmarked form of the verb is not considered an infinitive when it is forms a finite verb: like a present indicative ("I sit every day"), subjunctive ("I suggest that he sit"), or imperative ("Sit down!").

Hortative

cohortativehortatorycohortative mood
Such imperatives imply a second-person subject (you), but some other languages also have first- and third-person imperatives, with the meaning of "let's (do something)" or "let him/her/them (do something)" (the forms may alternatively be called cohortative and jussive).
If the person in control of the desired state of affairs is the addressee(s), the utterance is an imperative.

Realis mood

indicativeindicative moodrealis
Other moods existing in English besides the indicative are the imperative ("Be quiet!") and the conditional ("I would be quiet") (although this is not always analyzed as a mood) and in some dialects, the subjunctive (as in "I suggest you be quiet").

Finite verb

finitefinite formsfinite form
Like other finite verb forms, imperatives often inflect for person and number.
In English, finite verbs lacking subjects are normal in imperative sentences:

Exclamation mark

exclamation point!exclamation marks
When written, imperative sentences are often, but not always, terminated with an exclamation mark.
A sentence ending in an exclamation mark may represent an exclamation or an interjection (such as "Wow!", "Boo!"), or an imperative ("Stop!"), or may indicate astonishment or surprise: "They were the footprints of a gigantic hound!"

Do-support

do''-supportauxiliary ''dodo
Do-support is required for negated imperatives even when the verb is the copula be:

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
Other languages such as Latin, French and German have a greater variety of inflected imperative forms, marked for person and number, their formation often depending on a verb's conjugation pattern.

Affirmation and negation

negationnegativepolarity
There may also be differences of syntax between affirmative and negative imperative sentences.

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
Other languages such as Latin, French and German have a greater variety of inflected imperative forms, marked for person and number, their formation often depending on a verb's conjugation pattern.
The finite moods include the indicative mood (indicatif), the subjunctive mood (subjonctif), the imperative mood (impératif), and the conditional mood (conditionnel).

Korean speech levels

speech levelsKoreanlevels of honorific
Korean has six levels of honorific, all of which have their own imperative endings.
The names of the seven levels are derived from the non-honorific imperative form of the verb hada (하다; "to do") in each level, plus the suffix che, which means "style".

Null-subject language

null subject languagenull subjectnull-subject
Many languages, even not normally null-subject languages, omit the subject pronoun in imperative sentences, as usually occurs in English (see below).

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
Ancient Greek has imperative forms for present, aorist, and perfect tenses for the active, middle, and passive voices.
Verbs have four moods (indicative, imperative, subjunctive, and optative) and three voices (active, middle, and passive), as well as three persons (first, second, and third) and various other forms.

Voseo

vosa special form of the second personalternative to ''tú
vos (alternative to tú) usually takes the same forms as tú (usually with slightly different emphasis) but unique forms exist for it as well.
Vos also differs in its affirmative imperative conjugation from both tú and vosotros.

Subjunctive mood

subjunctivePresent subjunctiveconjunctive
Since there exists no actual imperative corresponding to Sie, the form is paraphrased with the third-person plural of the present subjunctive followed by the pronoun:

Irish language

IrishGaelicIrish Gaelic
Irish has imperative forms in all three persons and both numbers, although the first person singular is most commonly found in the negative (e.g. ná cloisim sin arís "let me not hear that again").
Verbs conjugate for 3 tenses: past, present, future; 2 aspects: simple, habitual; 2 numbers: singular, plural; 4 moods: indicative, subjunctive, conditional, imperative; relative forms; and in some verbs, independent and dependent forms.

Korean language

KoreanKorean-languageKorea
Korean has six levels of honorific, all of which have their own imperative endings.
The names of the seven levels are derived from the non-honorific imperative form of the verb 하다 (hada, "do") in each level, plus the suffix 체 ("che", Hanja: 體), which means "style".