Imperative programming

imperativeimperative programming languageimperative languageimperative languagesimperative programming languagesimperativelyimperative paradigmimperative programimperative computer languageimperative features
In computer science, imperative programming is a programming paradigm that uses statements that change a program's state.wikipedia
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Programming paradigm

Multi-paradigmmulti-paradigm programming languageprogramming paradigms
In computer science, imperative programming is a programming paradigm that uses statements that change a program's state.
Literate programming, as a form of imperative programming, structures programs as a human-centered web, as in a hypertext essay: documentation is integral to the program, and the program is structured following the logic of prose exposition, rather than compiler convenience.

Statement (computer science)

statementstatementscompound statement
In computer science, imperative programming is a programming paradigm that uses statements that change a program's state.
In computer programming, a statement is a syntactic unit of an imperative programming language that expresses some action to be carried out.

Declarative programming

declarativedeclarative languagedeclarative programming language
The term is often used in contrast to declarative programming, which focuses on what the program should accomplish without specifying how the program should achieve the result.
This is in contrast with imperative programming, which implements algorithms in explicit steps.

Command (computing)

commandcommandscomputer command
In much the same way that the imperative mood in natural languages expresses commands, an imperative program consists of commands for the computer to perform.
Specifically, the term command is used in imperative computer languages.

Assignment (computer science)

assignmentsingle assignmentassignment operator
Assignment statements, in imperative paradigm, perform an operation on information located in memory and store the results in memory for later use.
In most imperative programming languages, the assignment statement (or expression) is a fundamental construct.

Subroutine

functionfunctionssubroutines
Procedural programming is a type of imperative programming in which the program is built from one or more procedures (also termed subroutines or functions). These include the jump (called goto in many languages), switch, and the subprogram, subroutine, or procedure call (which usually returns to the next statement after the call).
The widespread use of subroutines with side effects is a characteristic of imperative programming languages.

Variable (computer science)

variablevariablesscalar
Higher-level imperative languages use variables and more complex statements, but still follow the same paradigm.
In imperative programming languages, values can generally be accessed or changed at any time.

Conditional (computer programming)

conditionalif-then-elseconditional statement
Conditional branching statements allow a sequence of statements to be executed only if some condition is met.
In imperative programming languages, the term "conditional statement" is usually used, whereas in functional programming, the terms "conditional expression" or "conditional construct" are preferred, because these terms all have distinct meanings.

Procedural programming

proceduralprocedural languageprocedural code
Procedural programming is a type of imperative programming in which the program is built from one or more procedures (also termed subroutines or functions).
Procedural programming languages are also imperative languages, because they make explicit references to the state of the execution environment.

State (computer science)

statestatefulstates
In computer science, imperative programming is a programming paradigm that uses statements that change a program's state.
Imperative programming is a programming paradigm (way of designing a programming language) that describes computation in terms of the program state, and of the statements which change the program state.

Fortran

Fortran 77Fortran 90FORTRAN IV
Many imperative programming languages (such as Fortran, BASIC, and C) are abstractions of assembly language.
Fortran (formerly FORTRAN, derived from Formula Translation ) is a general-purpose, compiled imperative programming language that is especially suited to numeric computation and scientific computing.

Switch statement

switchcase statementCASE structure
These include the jump (called goto in many languages), switch, and the subprogram, subroutine, or procedure call (which usually returns to the next statement after the call).
Switch statements function somewhat similarly to the statement used in programming languages like C/C++, C#, Visual Basic .NET, Java and exists in most high-level imperative programming languages such as Pascal, Ada, C/C++, C#, Visual Basic .NET, Java, and in many other types of language, using such keywords as,, or.

C (programming language)

CC programming languageC language
Many imperative programming languages (such as Fortran, BASIC, and C) are abstractions of assembly language. In the 1970s, Pascal was developed by Niklaus Wirth, and C was created by Dennis Ritchie while he was working at Bell Laboratories.
C is an imperative procedural language.

For loop

FORfor-loop loop
Looping statements (as in while loops, do while loops, and for loops) allow a sequence of statements to be executed multiple times.
A for-loop statement is available in most imperative programming languages.

ALGOL

ALGOL 60ALGOL programming languageALGOrithmic Language
In the late 1950s and 1960s, ALGOL was developed in order to allow mathematical algorithms to be more easily expressed, and even served as the operating system's target language for some computers.
ALGOL (short for "Algorithmic Language") is a family of imperative computer programming languages, originally developed in the mid-1950s, which greatly influenced many other languages and was the standard method for algorithm description used by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) in textbooks and academic sources for more than thirty years.

Computer program

programprogramscomputer programs
Recipes and process checklists, while not computer programs, are also familiar concepts that are similar in style to imperative programming; each step is an instruction, and the physical world holds the state.
Two of the main paradigms are imperative and declarative.

COBOL

Picture clauseCOBOL-85Named condition
COBOL (1960) and BASIC (1964) were both attempts to make programming syntax look more like English.
It is imperative, procedural and, since 2002, object-oriented.

Pascal (programming language)

PascalPascal programming languageISO 7185
In the 1970s, Pascal was developed by Niklaus Wirth, and C was created by Dennis Ritchie while he was working at Bell Laboratories.
Pascal is an imperative and procedural programming language, designed by Niklaus Wirth as a small, efficient language intended to encourage good programming practices using structured programming and data structuring.

Computer science

computer scientistcomputer sciencescomputer scientists
In computer science, imperative programming is a programming paradigm that uses statements that change a program's state.

Ada (programming language)

AdaAda programming languageAda 83
For the needs of the United States Department of Defense, Jean Ichbiah and a team at Honeywell began designing Ada in 1978, after a 4-year project to define the requirements for the language.
Ada is a structured, statically typed, imperative, and object-oriented high-level computer programming language, extended from Pascal and other languages.

Computer

computerscomputer systemdigital computer
In much the same way that the imperative mood in natural languages expresses commands, an imperative program consists of commands for the computer to perform.
Modern computers based on the von Neumann architecture often have machine code in the form of an imperative programming language.

Object-oriented programming

object-orientedobject orientedobject-oriented programming language
The concepts behind object-oriented programming attempt to extend this approach.
Many of the most widely used programming languages (such as C++, Java, Python, etc.) are multi-paradigm and they support object-oriented programming to a greater or lesser degree, typically in combination with imperative, procedural programming.

Python (programming language)

PythonPython programming languagePython 2
In the late 1980s and 1990s, the notable imperative languages drawing on object-oriented concepts were Perl, released by Larry Wall in 1987; Wolfram Language, released by Wolfram Research in 1988; Python, released by Guido van Rossum in 1990; Visual Basic and Visual C++ (which included Microsoft Foundation Class Library (MFC) 2.0), released by Microsoft in 1991 and 1993 respectively; PHP, released by Rasmus Lerdorf in 1994; Java, released by Sun Microsystems in 1995, JavaScript, by Brendan Eich (Netscape), and Ruby, by Yukihiro "Matz" Matsumoto, both released in 1995.

JavaScript

Server-side JavaScriptclient-side JavaScriptJS
In the late 1980s and 1990s, the notable imperative languages drawing on object-oriented concepts were Perl, released by Larry Wall in 1987; Wolfram Language, released by Wolfram Research in 1988; Python, released by Guido van Rossum in 1990; Visual Basic and Visual C++ (which included Microsoft Foundation Class Library (MFC) 2.0), released by Microsoft in 1991 and 1993 respectively; PHP, released by Rasmus Lerdorf in 1994; Java, released by Sun Microsystems in 1995, JavaScript, by Brendan Eich (Netscape), and Ruby, by Yukihiro "Matz" Matsumoto, both released in 1995.
As a multi-paradigm language, JavaScript supports event-driven, functional, and imperative (including object-oriented and prototype-based) programming styles.

C Sharp (programming language)

C#Visual C#C# programming language
Microsoft's .NET Framework (2002) is imperative at its core, as are its main target languages, VB.NET and C# that run on it; however Microsoft's F#, a functional language, also runs on it.
C# (pronounced see sharp, like the musical note C♯, but written with the number sign) is a general-purpose, multi-paradigm programming language encompassing strong typing, lexically scoped, imperative, declarative, functional, generic, object-oriented (class-based), and component-oriented programming disciplines.