Imperial units

imperialimperial systemimperial unitimperial measurementimperial measurementsimperial measurement systemimperial distancesBritish Imperialgallon(imperial)
The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial or Exchequer Standards of 1825) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced.wikipedia
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System of measurement

system of unitssystems of measurementmeasurement system
The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial or Exchequer Standards of 1825) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced.
Systems of measurement in modern use include the metric system, the imperial system, and United States customary units.

English units

EnglishEnglish unitEnglish system
The imperial system developed from what were first known as English units, as did the related system of United States customary units.
English units are the units of measurement that were used in England up to 1826 (when they were replaced by Imperial units), which evolved as a combination of the Anglo-Saxon and Roman systems of units.

Metric system

metricmetric unitsmetric unit
By the late 20th century, most nations of the former empire had officially adopted the metric system as their main system of measurement, although some imperial units are still used in the United Kingdom, Canada and other countries formerly part of the British Empire.
Though other currently or formerly widespread systems of weights and measures continue to exist, such as the British imperial system and the US customary system of weights and measures, in those systems most or all of the units are now defined in terms of the metric system, such as the US foot which is now a defined decimal fraction of a metre.

United States customary units

USUS customaryU.S. customary
The imperial system developed from what were first known as English units, as did the related system of United States customary units.
However, the United Kingdom's system of measures was overhauled in 1824 to create the imperial system, changing the definitions of some units.

Metrication

metrificationmetricatedadopted
By the late 20th century, most nations of the former empire had officially adopted the metric system as their main system of measurement, although some imperial units are still used in the United Kingdom, Canada and other countries formerly part of the British Empire.
Among them is the United Kingdom where laws in some or all contexts mandate or permit many imperial measures, such as miles and yards for road-sign distances, road speed limits in miles per hour, pints of beer, and inches for clothes.

Foot (unit)

feetftfoot
The most commonly used units are the mile or "li", the yard or "ma", the foot or "chek", and the inch or "tsun".
The foot ( pl. feet; abbreviation: ft; symbol: ′, the prime symbol) is a unit of length in the imperial and US customary systems of measurement.

Inch

ininchesinternational inch
The most commonly used units are the mile or "li", the yard or "ma", the foot or "chek", and the inch or "tsun".
The inch (abbreviation: in or ″) is a unit of length in the (British) imperial and United States customary systems of measurement.

Furlong

furlongs7 furlongsf
A furlong is a measure of distance in imperial units and U.S. customary units equal to one eighth of a mile, equivalent to 660 feet, 220 yards, 40 rods, or 10 chains.

Fathom

fathomsfathoms.fm
A fathom is a unit of length in the imperial and the U.S. customary systems equal to 6 ft, used especially for measuring the depth of water.

Acre

acresacreageac
The acre is a unit of land area used in the imperial and US customary systems.

Chain (unit)

chainschainchainage
The original railways (many built in the Victorian era) are a big user of imperial units, with distances officially measured in miles and yards or miles and chains, and also feet and inches, and speeds are in miles per hour, although more recent systems are metric, and London Underground uses metric.
These longer chains became obsolete following the adoption of the imperial system in 1824.

Gallon

gallonsimperial gallonGPM
In 1824, the various different gallons in use in the British Empire were replaced by the imperial gallon, a unit close in volume to the ale gallon.
The gallon is a unit of measurement for volume and fluid capacity in both the US customary units and the British imperial systems of measurement.

Pint

imperial pintpintspt
The pint (, ; symbol pt, sometimes abbreviated as "p" ) is a unit of volume or capacity in both the imperial and United States customary measurement systems.

Fluid ounce

fl ozouncefl. oz.
Various definitions have been used throughout history, but only two are still in common use: the British Imperial and the United States customary fluid ounce.

Pound (mass)

lbpoundspound
The Weights and Measures Act 1855 (18 & 19 Victoria C72) made the avoirdupois pound the primary unit of mass. In all the systems, the fundamental unit is the pound, and all other units are defined as fractions or multiples of it.
used in the imperial, United States customary and other systems of measurement.

Stone (unit)

ststonestones
The stone or stone weight (abbreviation: st.) is an English and imperial unit of mass now equal to 14 pounds (6.35029318 kg).

Ounce

ozouncesoz.
The ounce (abbreviated oz; apothecary symbol: ℥) is a unit of mass, weight, or volume used in most British derived customary systems of measurement.

Hundredweight

cwtcwt.Hundred Weight
In livestock auction markets, cattle are sold in dollars per hundredweight (short), whereas hogs are sold in dollars per hundred kilograms.
The hundredweight (abbreviation: cwt), formerly also known as the centum weight or quintal, is an English, imperial, and US customary unit of weight or mass of various values.

Long ton

tonstonlong tons
Long ton, also known as the imperial ton or displacement ton, is the name for the unit called the "ton" in the avoirdupois system of weights or Imperial system of measurements.

Link (unit)

linklinks
Even after the original tool was replaced by later instruments of higher precision, the unit itself was commonly used in this application throughout the English-speaking world (e.g. in the United States customary system of measurements and the Imperial system).

Minim (unit)

minimminimsmin
The minim (abbreviated min, '''unit of volume in both the imperial and US customary systems of measurement.

Quart

qtquartsdryqt
Presently, three kinds of quarts remain in use: the liquid quart and dry quart of the US customary system and the imperial quart of the British imperial system.

Slug (unit)

slugslugsmetric slug
The term imperial should not be applied to English units that were outlawed in the Weights and Measures Act 1824 or earlier, or which had fallen out of use by that time, nor to post-imperial inventions, such as the slug or poundal.
The slug is a derived unit of mass in the weight-based system of measures, most notably within the British Imperial measurement system and in the United States customary measures system.

Apothecaries' system

scruplescruplesapothecaries
In the USA, though no longer recommended, the apothecaries' system is still used occasionally in medicine, especially in prescriptions for older medications.
The imperial and US systems differ in the size of the basic unit (the gallon or the pint, one gallon being equal to eight pints), and in the number of fluid ounces per pint.