Imprisonment

incarcerationIncarceratedimprisonedinmateimprisonprisonerscaptivityterm of imprisonmentconfinementdeprivation of liberty
Imprisonment (from imprison, via French emprisonner, originally from Latin prensio, arrest, from prehendere, prendere, "to seize") in law is the specific state of being physically incarcerated or confined in an institutional setting such as a prison.wikipedia
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Indefinite imprisonment

indeterminate sentenceindeterminate sentencingIndefinite prison sentence
Courts of the United States, including the U.S. Supreme Court, have recognized that the minimum period in an indeterminate sentence that was actually imposed by a court of law is the official term of imprisonment.
Indefinite imprisonment or indeterminate imprisonment is the imposition of a sentence by imprisonment with no definite period of time set during sentencing.

Sentence (law)

sentencesentencedsentencing
Courts of the United States, including the U.S. Supreme Court, have recognized that the minimum period in an indeterminate sentence that was actually imposed by a court of law is the official term of imprisonment.
The sentence can generally involve a decree of imprisonment, a fine, and/or punishments against a defendant convicted of a crime.

United States federal probation and supervised release

supervised releasefederal supervised releaseProbation and supervised release under United States federal law
In other words, any "street time" (i.e., probation, parole, or supervised release) that was ordered by the court as part of the defendant's punishment does not constitute term of imprisonment. In the law of the United States, imprisonment does not include the period of probation, parole, or supervised release.
The judge has broad discretion in deciding what optional conditions to impose, as long as those conditions are reasonably related to the nature and circumstances of the offense and the history and characteristics of the defendant, the need for the sentence imposed to afford adequate deterrence to criminal conduct, the need to protect the public from further crimes of the defendant, the need to provide the defendant with needed educational or vocational training, medical care, or other correctional treatment in the most effective manner; and involve no greater deprivation of liberty than is reasonably necessary for these purposes and are consistent with any pertinent policy statements issued by the United States Sentencing Commission.

Crime

criminalcriminalscriminal offence
Criminals and army soldiers have been imprisoned throughout history.
If found guilty, an offender may be sentenced to a form of reparation such as a community sentence, or, depending on the nature of their offence, to undergo imprisonment, life imprisonment or, in some jurisdictions, execution.

Probation

Probation Serviceprobationaryprobationer
In other words, any "street time" (i.e., probation, parole, or supervised release) that was ordered by the court as part of the defendant's punishment does not constitute term of imprisonment. In the law of the United States, imprisonment does not include the period of probation, parole, or supervised release.
Finally, courts make their decisions as to whether to imprison the convict or to assign him or her probation.

Life imprisonment

life sentencelife in prisonlife
Life imprisonment (also known as imprisonment for life, life in prison, whole-life tariff, a life sentence, a life term, lifelong incarceration, life incarceration or simply life) is any sentence of imprisonment for a crime under which convicted persons are to remain in prison either for the rest of their natural life or until paroled or otherwise commuted to a fixed term.

Termes de la Ley

Expositiones terminorum legum Angliae
The 17th century book Termes de la Ley contains the following definition:
He, and Atkin LJ, approved the definition of imprisonment contained in this book.

Law of the United States

United States federal lawUnited States lawAmerican lawyer
In the law of the United States, imprisonment does not include the period of probation, parole, or supervised release.
Generally, crimes can result in incarceration, but torts (see below) cannot.

Detention (imprisonment)

detentiondetaineedetained
Any form of imprisonment where a person's freedom of liberty is removed can be classed as detention, although the term is often associated with persons who are being held without warrant or charge before any have been raised.

Misdemeanor

misdemeanourpetty crimemisdemeanors
For example, if a person is convicted of a Pennsylvania misdemeanor and sentenced to 4 to 23 months of imprisonment, he or she has actually been sentenced to only 4 months of imprisonment for INA purposes.
In the United States, misdemeanors are typically crimes with a maximum punishment of 12 months of incarceration, typically in a local jail as contrasted with felons, who are typically incarcerated in a prison.

Tort

tort lawtortstortfeasor
Imprisonment without lawful cause is a tort called false imprisonment.
This explains why incarceration is usually available as a penalty for serious crimes, but not usually for torts.

Removal proceedings

removeddeportationdeportation hearings
It is also important to note that for deportation purposes, a criminal alien must be rearrested and taken into custody of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement after his or her term of imprisonment has been completed.

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
Imprisonment (from imprison, via French emprisonner, originally from Latin prensio, arrest, from prehendere, prendere, "to seize") in law is the specific state of being physically incarcerated or confined in an institutional setting such as a prison.

Law

legallawslegal theory
Imprisonment (from imprison, via French emprisonner, originally from Latin prensio, arrest, from prehendere, prendere, "to seize") in law is the specific state of being physically incarcerated or confined in an institutional setting such as a prison.

Prison

jailgaolpenitentiary
Imprisonment (from imprison, via French emprisonner, originally from Latin prensio, arrest, from prehendere, prendere, "to seize") in law is the specific state of being physically incarcerated or confined in an institutional setting such as a prison.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
Courts of the United States, including the U.S. Supreme Court, have recognized that the minimum period in an indeterminate sentence that was actually imposed by a court of law is the official term of imprisonment.

Parole

paroledsupervised releasenon-parole period
In other words, any "street time" (i.e., probation, parole, or supervised release) that was ordered by the court as part of the defendant's punishment does not constitute term of imprisonment. In the law of the United States, imprisonment does not include the period of probation, parole, or supervised release.

Defendant

defendantscriminal defendantco-defendant
In other words, any "street time" (i.e., probation, parole, or supervised release) that was ordered by the court as part of the defendant's punishment does not constitute term of imprisonment.

False imprisonment

unlawful imprisonmentunlawful detentionfalsely imprisoned
Imprisonment without lawful cause is a tort called false imprisonment. The latter case constitutes "false imprisonment".

Minority group

minorityminoritiesethnic minorities
Ethnic minorities can also contribute disproportionate numbers to prison populations.

Liberty

freedomliberationliberties
In English law, imprisonment is the restraint of a person's liberty.

Immigration and Nationality Act

Immigration and Nationality Act (disambiguation)(INA)Acts of Congress
For purposes of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), every "reference to a term of imprisonment or a sentence ... is deemed to include the period of incarceration or confinement ordered by a court of law regardless of any suspension of the imposition or execution of that imprisonment or sentence in whole or in part."

Synonym

synonymssyn.synonymous
This makes the word "sentence" and the phrase "term of imprisonment" synonymous.

United States Congress

CongressU.S. CongressCongressional
But this premise conflicts with the plain language of the U.S. Congress, which had long stated that "the maximum penalty possible for the crime ... did not exceed imprisonment for one year and, if the alien was convicted of such crime, the alien was not sentenced to a term of imprisonment in excess of 6 months (regardless of the extent to which the sentence was ultimately executed)."

Alien (law)

alienaliensforeigners
It is also important to note that for deportation purposes, a criminal alien must be rearrested and taken into custody of the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement after his or her term of imprisonment has been completed.