Examples of anti-personnel mines. Center: Valmara 69 (a bounding mine); right: VS-50
Ammunition rigged for an IED discovered by Iraqi police in Baghdad in November 2005
Swedish FFV 028 anti-tank-mines of the German Bundeswehr (inert versions)
This Cougar in Al Anbar, Iraq, was hit by a directed charge IED, approximately 90 –.
Roman caltrop
X-ray of a suitcase showing a pipe bomb and a laptop.
Illustration of the "self-tripped trespass land mine" from the Huolongjing
Improvised explosive device in Iraq. The concave copper shape on top defines an explosively formed penetrator/projectile
'Underground sky soaring thunder', land mines connected to weapons above ground, from the Wubei Zhi
Artillery shells and gasoline cans discovered in the back of a pick-up truck in Iraq
Cutaway diagram of the S-mine
A U.S. Marine in Iraq shown with a robot used for disposal of buried devices
The Schu-mine 42, the most common mine used in the Second World War
Israeli IDF Caterpillar D9 armored bulldozer, which is used by the IDF Combat Engineering Corps for clearing heavy belly charges and booby-trapped buildings.
Claymore mine with firing device and electric blasting cap assembly
U.S. Marines with Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) destroy an improvised explosive device cache in southern Afghanistan in June 2010.
An L9 Bar Mine
A Stryker lies on its side following a buried IED blast in Iraq. (2007)
Section of an anti-tank mine. Note the yellow main charge wrapped around a red booster charge, and the secondary fuze well on the side of the mine designed for an anti-handling device
Oil-drum roadside IED removed from culvert in 1984
Diagram of components
Wheelbarrow counter-IED robot on streets of Northern Ireland in 1978
Examples of anti-handling devices
Captured IEDs from a cache left behind by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Syria, 26 January 2019
Anti personnel mine in Cambodia
A U.S. Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal technician removing the fuze from a Russian-made mine to clear a minefield outside of Fallujah, Iraq
Argentine minefield at Port William, Falkland Islands created in 1982; clearance inhibited by boggy terrain
Minefield warning on the Golan Heights, still valid more than 40 years after creation of the field by the Syrian army
School posters in Karabakh educating children on mines and UXO
British Royal Engineers practice mine clearance
Party states to the Ottawa Treaty (in blue)
Bomb disposal Advanced Bomb Suit

Overlapping both categories is the improvised explosive device (IED), which is "a device placed or fabricated in an improvised manner incorporating explosive material, destructive, lethal, noxious, incendiary, pyrotechnic materials or chemicals designed to destroy, disfigure, distract or harass. They may incorporate military stores, but are normally devised from non-military components."

- Land mine

In the conflicts of the 21st century, anti-personnel improvised explosive devices (IED) have partially replaced conventional or military landmines as the source of injury to dismounted (pedestrian) soldiers and civilians.

- Improvised explosive device
Examples of anti-personnel mines. Center: Valmara 69 (a bounding mine); right: VS-50

4 related topics

Alpha

The first tank to engage in battle, the British Mark I tank (pictured in 1916) with the Solomon camouflage scheme

Tank

Armoured fighting vehicle intended as a primary offensive weapon in front-line ground combat.

Armoured fighting vehicle intended as a primary offensive weapon in front-line ground combat.

The first tank to engage in battle, the British Mark I tank (pictured in 1916) with the Solomon camouflage scheme
An M4 Sherman tank in Italy in 1943 during WWII.
A Leopard 2A7 tank in Germany.
A Japanese Type 10 firing.
Model of Leonardo da Vinci's fighting vehicle
British World War I Mark V* tank
French Renault FT tanks, here operated by the US army, pioneered the use of a fully traversable turret and served as pattern for most modern tanks.
French Hotchkiss H-39 light tank of 1939
German Tiger II tanks of Schwere Panzer Abteilung 503 (s.Pz.Abt. 503) 'Feldherrnhalle' posing in formation for a German newsreel in 1944
Cutaway of an M4A4 Sherman tank, the primary tank used by the United States and a number of the other western allies during the Second World War.
The Battle of Kursk was credited to be the largest tank battle ever fought, with each side deploying nearly 3,000 tanks.
Sherman tanks joining the U.S. Fifth Army forces in the beachhead at Anzio during the Italian Campaign, 1944
The Cold War era Soviet T-72 was the most widely deployed main battle tank across the world.
An Italian C1 Ariete in Rome in 2010.
Graphic representation of the US Army's cancelled XM1202 Mounted Combat System
Labelled diagram of an M1 Abrams
A sectioned 105mm rifled Royal Ordnance L7 tank gun
German Leopard 2A6 from a Panzerbattalion fires its main gun during the shoot-off of Strong Europe Tank Challenge.
A Merkava Mk IIID Baz firing
The Russian T-90 is fitted with a "three-tiered" protection systems:
1: Composite armour in the turret
2: Third generation Kontakt-5 ERA
3: Shtora-1 countermeasures suite.
PLA's Type 99a tank with disruptive camouflage painting
A British Challenger 2 Theatre Entry Standard fitted with a mobile camouflage system.
Troops carry a lightweight wood-framed "dummy" tank into position.
The British Challenger II is protected by second-generation Chobham armour
Blazer explosive reactive armour (ERA) blocks on an Israeli M-60
IDF Merkava Mk4 tank with Trophy APS ("מעיל רוח") during training
M1 Abrams offloading from Landing Craft Air Cushioned vehicle.
The M1 Abrams is powered by a 1500 shp Honeywell AGT 1500 gas turbine engine, giving it a governed top speed of 45 mph on paved roads, and 30 mph cross-country.
The tank commander's position in an AMX Leclerc
Positions of crewmembers in a Russian T-72B3 tank. The driver (3) is seated in the vehicles front, commander (1) and gunner (2) are positioned in the turret, directly above the carousel (4), which contains the ammunition for the autoloading mechanism.
A view in a M1A1 Abrams tank of the gunner's station (bottom left) and commander's station (top right)
The Indian Arjun MBT's hydropneumatic suspension at work, while moving over a bump track.
German Army Leopard 2A6M incorporates networked battlefield technology
Merkava Mark 4 main battle tank is equipped with a digital C4IS battle-management system.
Circular review system of the company LimpidArmor

As of 2005, there were 1,100 M1 Abrams used by the United States Army in the course of the Iraq War, and they have proven to have an unexpectedly high level of vulnerability to roadside bombs.

Protection against kinetic energy penetrators and high-explosive anti-tank (HEAT) shells fired by other tanks is of primary importance, but tank armour also aims to protect against infantry mortars, grenades, rocket-propelled grenades, anti-tank guided missiles, anti-tank mines, anti-tank rifles, bombs, direct artillery hits, and (less often) nuclear, biological and chemical threats, any of which could disable or destroy a tank or its crew.

Vietnam War: Republic of Korea Armed Forces soldiers show Vietnamese villagers types of Viet Cong booby traps.

Booby trap

Device or setup that is intended to kill, harm, or surprise a human being or an animal.

Device or setup that is intended to kill, harm, or surprise a human being or an animal.

Vietnam War: Republic of Korea Armed Forces soldiers show Vietnamese villagers types of Viet Cong booby traps.
A group of 105mm artillery shells with plastic explosive stuffed into their fuze pockets. Each of the 5 shells has been linked together with red detcord to make them detonate simultaneously. To turn this assembly into a booby trap, the final step would be to connect an M142 firing device to the detcord and hide everything under some form of cover e.g. newspapers or a bed-sheet.
Booby-trap firing devices, c. 1941: press, pull and release switches; mass-produced components intended for the construction of booby traps.
A Yugoslav POMZ anti-personnel mine that has been booby trapped with a hand grenade. A deminer could disable the stake mine, only to set off the hand-grenade when they remove the mine for disposal. (Balkans 1996)
Simple Trou de loup booby trap: concealed pitfall with sharp spike at the bottom
USSR booby trap firing device - pull fuze: normally connected to a tripwire
Alternative design of USSR booby trap firing device - pull fuze: normally connected to tripwire
USSR booby-trap firing device - pressure fuze: victim steps on loose floorboard with fuze concealed underneath

It can also be triggered by vehicles driving along a road, as in the case of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

There is no clear division between a booby trap and buried conventional land mines triggered by a tripwire or directional mine.

A Russian TM-46 anti-tank blast mine.

Anti-tank mine

A Russian TM-46 anti-tank blast mine.
Soviet TM-35 mine at the Museum of Heroic Defense and Liberation of Sevastopol on Sapun Mountain, Sevastopol
German Riegel mine 43
Anti Tank Mine used by Indian Army
Polish MPB mine.
How to use an American M-24 antitank mine
Casspir Personnel Carrier
RG-31 Mine Protected Armored Personnel Carrier (MP APC) in service with the US Army in Iraq in 2006

An anti-tank mine (abbreviated to "AT mine") is a type of land mine designed to damage or destroy vehicles including tanks and armored fighting vehicles.

This self forging projectile principle has been used for some French and Soviet off route mines and has earned infamy as an improvised explosive devices (IED) technique in Israel and especially Iraq.

Grooved body of a Second World War-era U.S. Mk 2 grenade. The grooves covering the exterior of the grenade are used to aid in the gripping of the grenade when throwing.

Fragmentation (weaponry)

Grooved body of a Second World War-era U.S. Mk 2 grenade. The grooves covering the exterior of the grenade are used to aid in the gripping of the grenade when throwing.
Diagram of S-mine in the delivery of steel ball fragments
An illustration of a fragmentation bomb from the 14th century Ming Dynasty text Huolongjing. The black dots represent iron pellets.
Early artillery shell, with the fragments it would generate. 1900
Artillery shell fragment from the Gulf War
Grenade fragments in the soft tissue of the lower leg (along with an old fracture of the fibula)

Fragmentation is the process by which the casing, shot, or other components of an anti-personnel weapon, bomb, barrel bomb, land mine, IED, artillery, mortar, tank gun, or autocannon shell, rocket, missile, grenade, etc. are dispersed and/or shattered by the detonation of the explosive filler.