Improvised explosive device

Ammunition rigged for an IED discovered by Iraqi police in Baghdad in November 2005
This Cougar in Al Anbar, Iraq, was hit by a directed charge IED, approximately 90 –.
X-ray of a suitcase showing a pipe bomb and a laptop.
Improvised explosive device in Iraq. The concave copper shape on top defines an explosively formed penetrator/projectile
Artillery shells and gasoline cans discovered in the back of a pick-up truck in Iraq
A U.S. Marine in Iraq shown with a robot used for disposal of buried devices
Israeli IDF Caterpillar D9 armored bulldozer, which is used by the IDF Combat Engineering Corps for clearing heavy belly charges and booby-trapped buildings.
U.S. Marines with Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) destroy an improvised explosive device cache in southern Afghanistan in June 2010.
A Stryker lies on its side following a buried IED blast in Iraq. (2007)
Oil-drum roadside IED removed from culvert in 1984
Wheelbarrow counter-IED robot on streets of Northern Ireland in 1978
Captured IEDs from a cache left behind by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Syria, 26 January 2019

Bomb constructed and deployed in ways other than in conventional military action.

- Improvised explosive device
Ammunition rigged for an IED discovered by Iraqi police in Baghdad in November 2005

45 related topics

Alpha

A Russian Mil Mi-8 helicopter brought down by Chechen fighters near the capital Grozny in 1994.

First Chechen War

Rebellion by the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria against the Russian Federation, fought from December 1994 to August 1996.

Rebellion by the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria against the Russian Federation, fought from December 1994 to August 1996.

A Russian Mil Mi-8 helicopter brought down by Chechen fighters near the capital Grozny in 1994.
Dudayev's supporters pray in front of the Presidential Palace in Grozny, 1994.
Chechen women praying for Russian troops not to advance on Grozny, December 1994.
A Chechen fighter near the burned-out ruins of the Presidential Palace in Grozny, January 1995
A Chechen stands near a burning house in Grozny.
A Chechen woman with a wounded child.
A Russian soldier inspecting civilian bodies in a mass grave and two more body lines in the left, Chechnya, 1995.
Chechen irregular fighter with a Borz submachine gun
A group of Chechen fighters.
Drawing by 10 year old Polina Zherebtsova from her diary showing the battle of Grozny.
Dead bodies on a truck in Grozny.
Street of the ruined capital Grozny after war.

The successful use of improvised explosive devices was particularly noteworthy; they also effectively exploited a combination of mines and ambushes.

Demonstration of a German stielhandgranate (shaft hand grenade), a high explosive grenade with time fuze, the Netherlands, 1946.

Grenade

Explosive weapon typically thrown by hand , but can also refer to a shell (explosive projectile) shot from the muzzle of a rifle (as a rifle grenade) or a grenade launcher.

Explosive weapon typically thrown by hand , but can also refer to a shell (explosive projectile) shot from the muzzle of a rifle (as a rifle grenade) or a grenade launcher.

Demonstration of a German stielhandgranate (shaft hand grenade), a high explosive grenade with time fuze, the Netherlands, 1946.
M67 fragmentation grenade, a modern (1968-present) hand grenade in the US
Hand grenades filled with Greek fire; surrounded by caltrops. (10th–12th centuries National Historical Museum, Athens, Greece)
Mongolian grenade attack on Japanese during Yuan dynasty.
Seven ceramic hand grenades of the 17th Century found in Ingolstadt Germany
An illustration of a fragmentation bomb known as the 'divine bone dissolving fire oil bomb' (lan gu huo you shen pao) from the Huolongjing. The black dots represent iron pellets.
Earliest known representation of a gun (a fire lance) and a grenade (upper right), Dunhuang, 10th century AD.
A cross-section of a Ketchum Grenade, used during the American Civil War.
One of the earliest modern hand grenades. Fielded in the British Army from 1908, it was unsuccessful in the trenches of World War I, and was replaced by the Mills bomb.
The Mills bomb – the first modern fragmentation grenade – was used in the trenches from 1915
Cross section of the Model 24 Stielhandgranate
World War II-era U.S. Mk 2 grenade
German DM51 hand grenade with blast core (top) and fragmentation sleeve (bottom)
Diagram of the Mk3A2 concussion grenade
Soviet RPG-43 HEAT grenade
M84 stun grenade (1995–present)
Incendiary grenade
Inert training grenade made from hard rubber
Hand grenade fuze system
M61 grenade (1959-1968), with safety clip around the lever and the bent tip of the safety pin at top
Typical safety pin. A cotter pin with a ring attached
An infantryman throwing a hand grenade during training, 1942
Grenade immediately after being thrown at a practice range. The safety lever has separated in mid-air from the body of the grenade.
Hand grenade converted to booby trap with pull trip wire trigger
Grenade on a kepi of the French Army

However, they were still used with limited success against lightly-armored mine-resistant ambush protected (MRAP) vehicles, designed for protection only against improvised explosive devices in the Iraqi insurgency in the early 2000s.

A BTR-80 armored personnel carrier disabled by militants during the 2000 Zhani-Vedeno ambush

Second Chechen War

The Second Chechen War (Втора́я чече́нская война́, ШолгIа оьрсийн-нохчийн тIом ) took place in Chechnya and the border regions of the North Caucasus between the Russian Federation and the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria, from August 1999 to April 2009.

The Second Chechen War (Втора́я чече́нская война́, ШолгIа оьрсийн-нохчийн тIом ) took place in Chechnya and the border regions of the North Caucasus between the Russian Federation and the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria, from August 1999 to April 2009.

A BTR-80 armored personnel carrier disabled by militants during the 2000 Zhani-Vedeno ambush
Chechnya and the Caucasus region
A Russian helicopter downed by Chechen militants near the capital Grozny, during the First Chechen War
Cadets of the Ichkeria Chechen National Guard, 1999
A mass grave in Chechnya
Fallen Russian soldiers in the Zhani-Vedeno ambush
Photos of the victims of the 2004 Beslan school hostage crisis
A Russian soldier stands on a mass grave of Chechen civilians in Komsomolskoye, 2000
Flag of the Caucasian Emirate
Akhmad Kadyrov, formerly a leading separatist mufti, had switched sides in 2000
Chechen leader Ramzan Kadyrov
Dmitry Medvedev meets with Alexander Bortnikov on 27 March 2009 to discuss the ending of counter-terrorism operations in Chechnya.

The separatist units employed IEDs and sometimes combined for larger raids.

The first tank to engage in battle, the British Mark I tank (pictured in 1916) with the Solomon camouflage scheme

Tank

Armoured fighting vehicle intended as a primary offensive weapon in front-line ground combat.

Armoured fighting vehicle intended as a primary offensive weapon in front-line ground combat.

The first tank to engage in battle, the British Mark I tank (pictured in 1916) with the Solomon camouflage scheme
An M4 Sherman tank in Italy in 1943 during WWII.
A Leopard 2A7 tank in Germany.
A Japanese Type 10 firing.
Model of Leonardo da Vinci's fighting vehicle
British World War I Mark V* tank
French Renault FT tanks, here operated by the US army, pioneered the use of a fully traversable turret and served as pattern for most modern tanks.
French Hotchkiss H-39 light tank of 1939
German Tiger II tanks of Schwere Panzer Abteilung 503 (s.Pz.Abt. 503) 'Feldherrnhalle' posing in formation for a German newsreel in 1944
Cutaway of an M4A4 Sherman tank, the primary tank used by the United States and a number of the other western allies during the Second World War.
The Battle of Kursk was credited to be the largest tank battle ever fought, with each side deploying nearly 3,000 tanks.
Sherman tanks joining the U.S. Fifth Army forces in the beachhead at Anzio during the Italian Campaign, 1944
The Cold War era Soviet T-72 was the most widely deployed main battle tank across the world.
An Italian C1 Ariete in Rome in 2010.
Graphic representation of the US Army's cancelled XM1202 Mounted Combat System
Labelled diagram of an M1 Abrams
A sectioned 105mm rifled Royal Ordnance L7 tank gun
German Leopard 2A6 from a Panzerbattalion fires its main gun during the shoot-off of Strong Europe Tank Challenge.
A Merkava Mk IIID Baz firing
The Russian T-90 is fitted with a "three-tiered" protection systems:
1: Composite armour in the turret
2: Third generation Kontakt-5 ERA
3: Shtora-1 countermeasures suite.
PLA's Type 99a tank with disruptive camouflage painting
A British Challenger 2 Theatre Entry Standard fitted with a mobile camouflage system.
Troops carry a lightweight wood-framed "dummy" tank into position.
The British Challenger II is protected by second-generation Chobham armour
Blazer explosive reactive armour (ERA) blocks on an Israeli M-60
IDF Merkava Mk4 tank with Trophy APS ("מעיל רוח") during training
M1 Abrams offloading from Landing Craft Air Cushioned vehicle.
The M1 Abrams is powered by a 1500 shp Honeywell AGT 1500 gas turbine engine, giving it a governed top speed of 45 mph on paved roads, and 30 mph cross-country.
The tank commander's position in an AMX Leclerc
Positions of crewmembers in a Russian T-72B3 tank. The driver (3) is seated in the vehicles front, commander (1) and gunner (2) are positioned in the turret, directly above the carousel (4), which contains the ammunition for the autoloading mechanism.
A view in a M1A1 Abrams tank of the gunner's station (bottom left) and commander's station (top right)
The Indian Arjun MBT's hydropneumatic suspension at work, while moving over a bump track.
German Army Leopard 2A6M incorporates networked battlefield technology
Merkava Mark 4 main battle tank is equipped with a digital C4IS battle-management system.
Circular review system of the company LimpidArmor

As of 2005, there were 1,100 M1 Abrams used by the United States Army in the course of the Iraq War, and they have proven to have an unexpectedly high level of vulnerability to roadside bombs.

Flag of the Taliban, also used as the flag of Afghanistan

Taliban

Deobandi Islamic fundamentalist, militant Islamist, and jihadist political movement in Afghanistan.

Deobandi Islamic fundamentalist, militant Islamist, and jihadist political movement in Afghanistan.

Flag of the Taliban, also used as the flag of Afghanistan
President Ronald Reagan meeting with Afghan Mujahideen leaders in the Oval Office in 1983
The Taliban emerged in the southern Afghan city of Kandahar around September 1994.
Map showing political control in Afghanistan in late 1996, following the capture of Kabul by the Taliban
The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan and the Northern Alliance in early 2000, when the Taliban was at the height of its power
Taliban border guard in 2001
The Taliban were removed from power in October 2001 by a unified effort of United Islamic Front (Northern Alliance) ground forces, small US Special Operations teams and US air support.
A Northern Alliance fighter wraps a bandolier around his body while assisting US forces at a compound in Helmand Province in Afghanistan, January 2002.
Development of a then-small Taliban insurgency in 2002 until 2006, the year which saw an escalation in Taliban attacks
US representative Zalmay Khalilzad (left) meeting with Taliban delegation in Doha, Qatar on 21 November 2020
A map of Afghanistan showing the 2021 Taliban offensive
Taliban Humvee in Kabul, August 2021.
The Darul Uloom Deoband in Uttar Pradesh, India, where the Deobandi movement began
Taller Buddha in 1963 and in 2008 after destruction
November 1999 public execution in Kabul of a mother of five who was found guilty of killing her husband with an axe while he slept.
Taliban religious police beating a woman in Kabul on 26 August 2001
Members of the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan protesting against the Taliban, in Peshawar, Pakistan in 1998
Afghans in Germany protesting against Taliban violence, 14 August 2021
Taliban police patrolling the streets of Herat in a pick-up truck
Opium in Taliban safehouse in Helmand
Afghanistan-Pakistan border region pictured in Paktia Province
US soldiers burning a suspected Taliban safehouse in March 2007
US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meeting with Taliban delegation in Doha, Qatar, on 12 September 2020
Pakistani journalist Hamid Mir interviewing al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden in Afghanistan, between circa 1997 and circa 1998.

The high number of civilians killed by the Taliban is blamed in part on their increasing use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs), "for instance, 16 IEDs have been planted in girls' schools" by the Taliban.