Impulsivity

impulsiveimpulsivenessimpulsive behaviorimpulsive behaviouracting without regards to consequencesdifficulty controlling behaviorimpulseimpulsive behaviorsinhibitioninhibitory control
In psychology, impulsivity (or impulsiveness) is a tendency to act on a whim, displaying behavior characterized by little or no forethought, reflection, or consideration of the consequences.wikipedia
247 Related Articles

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

ADHDattention deficit disorderhyperactivity
Impulsivity is both a facet of personality and a major component of various disorders, including ADHD, substance use disorders, bipolar disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder.
It is characterized by difficulty paying attention, excessive activity and acting without regards to consequences, which are otherwise not appropriate for a person's age.

Borderline personality disorder

borderlineborderline personalityemotional instability
Impulsivity is both a facet of personality and a major component of various disorders, including ADHD, substance use disorders, bipolar disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder.

Bipolar disorder

bipolarmanic depressionmanic depressive
Impulsivity is both a facet of personality and a major component of various disorders, including ADHD, substance use disorders, bipolar disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder. In both adults and children, ADHD has a high rate of comorbidity with other mental health disorders such as learning disability, conduct disorder, anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and substance use disorders.
Mania can also present with increased self-esteem or grandiosity, rapid speech, the subjective feeling of rapid thoughts, disinhibited social behavior, or impulsivity.

Facet (psychology)

facetsfacetfaceted
Impulsivity is both a facet of personality and a major component of various disorders, including ADHD, substance use disorders, bipolar disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder.

Delayed gratification

instant gratificationdeferred gratificationdelay gratification
"When such actions have positive outcomes, they tend not to be seen as signs of impulsivity, but as indicators of boldness, quickness, spontaneity, courageousness, or unconventionality" Thus, the construct of impulsivity includes at least two independent components: first, acting without an appropriate amount of deliberation, which may or may not be functional; and second, choosing short-term gains over long-term ones.
Funder and Block expanded psychoanalytic research on the topic, and found that impulsivity, or a lack of ego-control, has a stronger effect on one's ability to delay rewards if a reward is more desirable.

Impulse control disorder

impulse control disordersimpulse controlimpulse-control disorder
Impulse control disorder (ICDs) are a class of DSM diagnoses that do not fall into the other diagnostic categories of the manual (e.g. substance use disorders), and that are characterized by extreme difficulty controlling impulses or urges despite negative consequences.
Impulse-control disorder (ICD) is a class of psychiatric disorders characterized by impulsivity – failure to resist a temptation, an urge, an impulse, or the inability to not speak on a thought.

Substance use disorder

addictionsubstance use disordersaddictive
Impulsivity is both a facet of personality and a major component of various disorders, including ADHD, substance use disorders, bipolar disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder.
Psychological risk factors include high impulsivity, sensation seeking, neuroticism and openness to experience in combination with low conscientiousness.

Problem gambling

gambling addictioncompulsive gamblingpathological gambling
Specific disorders included within this category include intermittent explosive disorder, kleptomania, pathological gambling, pyromania, trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder), and impulse control disorders not otherwise specified (ICD NOS).
A common feature shared by people who suffer from gambling addiction is impulsivity.

Substance abuse

drug abusedrug useabuse
In both adults and children, ADHD has a high rate of comorbidity with other mental health disorders such as learning disability, conduct disorder, anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and substance use disorders.
Impulsivity is characterized by actions based on sudden desires, whims, or inclinations rather than careful thought.

Antisocial personality disorder

sociopathsociopathicantisocial
Impulsivity is both a facet of personality and a major component of various disorders, including ADHD, substance use disorders, bipolar disorder, antisocial personality disorder, and borderline personality disorder.

Nucleus accumbens

nucleus accumbens shellnucleus accumbens coreaccumbal
Lesions of the nucleus accumbens core subregion or basolateral amygdala produce shifts towards choosing the smaller-sooner reward, suggesting the involvement of these brain regions in the preference for delayed reinforcers.
The nucleus accumbens plays a lesser role in processing fear (a form of aversion), impulsivity, and the placebo effect.

Barratt Impulsiveness Scale

Barratt Impulsivity Scale
People who scored high on the Barratt Impulsivity Scale (BIS) were more likely to stop treatment for cocaine abuse.
The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) is a widely used measure of impulsiveness.

Aggression

aggressiveaggressivenessaggressive behavior
Half of the items describe impulsive aggression and half the items describe premeditated aggression.
Classification may also encompass aggression-related emotions (e.g. anger) and mental states (e.g. impulsivity, hostility).

Dopamine

dopaminergic systemDAdopaminergic
Preliminary, though variable, findings also suggest that striatal activation is different between gamblers and controls, and that neurotransmitter differences (e.g. dopamine, serotonin, opioids, glutamate, norepinephrine) may exist as well.
As a consequence, high levels of dopamine lead to high levels of motor activity and impulsive behavior; low levels of dopamine lead to torpor and slowed reactions.

Self-control

self controlself-regulationwillpower
Consumption of a tempting food by non-clinical individuals increases when self-regulatory resources are previously depleted by another task, suggesting that it is caused by a breakdown in self control.
Most of the research in the field of self-control assumes that self-control is in general better than impulsiveness.

Dysfunctional impulsivity

The scale also includes dysfunctional impulsivity which is characterized by making quick decisions when it is not optimal.
Dysfunctional impulsivity is a type of impulsivity that is associated with a tendency to make quick decisions when this type of decision-making is non-optimal.

Functional impulsivity

This includes functional impulsivity which is characterized by quick decision making when it is optimal, a trait that is often considered to be a source of pride.
This impulsivity is in contrast with dysfunctional impulsivity, which is a tendency to make quick decisions when it is not optimal.

Impulse purchase

impulse buyingimpulse buyimpulse
Impulse buying consists of purchasing a product or service without any previous intent to make that purchase.

Alternative five model of personality

alternative fiveZuckerman
Personality psychologists also use the Gray behavioral inhibition system measure, the Eysenck scale for neurotic introversion, and the Zuckerman Neuroticism-Anxiety scale.

Conscientiousness

conscientiousconscientious groundspersistence
Personality researchers have used the Rothbart effortful control measures and the conscientiousness scale of the Big Five as inventory measures of interference control.
It is negatively associated with impulsive sensation-seeking in Zuckerman's alternative five model.

Novelty seeking

novelty“Novelty Seeking (NS)”
In psychology, novelty seeking (NS) is a personality trait associated with exploratory activity in response to novel stimulation, impulsive decision making, extravagance in approach to reward cues, quick loss of temper, and avoidance of frustration.

Five-choice serial-reaction time task

5-choice serial reaction time task
Other common impulsivity tasks include the Continuous performance task (CPT), 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), Stroop task, and Matching Familiar Figures Task.
The Five-choice serial-reaction time task (5CSRTT) is a laboratory behavioral task used in psychological research to assess visuospatial attention and motor impulsivity in animals.

Addiction

drug addictiondrug addictdrug addicts
There has been much debate over whether or not the ICDs deserve a diagnostic category of their own, or whether they are in fact phenomenologically and epidemiologically related to other major psychiatric conditions like obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), affective disorders, and addictive disorders.
Models of addiction risk that have been proposed in psychology literature include an affect dysregulation model of positive and negative psychological affects, the reinforcement sensitivity theory model of impulsiveness and behavioral inhibition, and an impulsivity model of reward sensitization and impulsiveness.

Continuous performance task

Continuous Performance Test
Other common impulsivity tasks include the Continuous performance task (CPT), 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT), Stroop task, and Matching Familiar Figures Task.
Sustained attention is the ability to maintain a consistent focus on some continuous activity or stimuli, and is associated with impulsivity.

Anti-social behaviour

antisocial behavioranti-socialantisocial
Those subjects who clustered on the impulsive factor showed a broad range of emotional and cognitive impairments; those who clustered on the premeditated factor showed a greater inclination for aggression and anti-social behaviour.