Inca Empire

IncaIncanIncasIncan EmpireempireInca culturesuyuInca civilizationInkaTawantinsuyu
The Inca Empire (Tawantinsuyu, lit. "The Four Regions"), also known as the Incan Empire and the Inka Empire, was the largest empire in pre-Columbian America.wikipedia
1,761 Related Articles

Cusco

CuzcoCusco, PeruCity of Cuzco
The administrative, political and military center of the empire was located in Cusco, Peru.
The site was the historic capital of the Inca Empire from the 13th until the 16th-century Spanish conquest.

Peru

🇵🇪PerúPeruvian
The administrative, political and military center of the empire was located in Cusco, Peru. At its largest, the empire joined Peru, southwest Ecuador, western and south central Bolivia, northwest Argentina, northern Chile and a small part of southwest Colombia into a state comparable to the historical empires of Eurasia. At its height, the Inca Empire included Peru and Bolivia, most of what is now Ecuador and a large portion of what is today Chile, north of the Maule River.
Ranging from the Norte Chico civilization in the 32nd century BC, the oldest civilization in the Americas and one of the five cradles of civilization, to the Inca Empire, the largest state in pre-Columbian America, the territory now including Peru has one of the longest histories of civilization of any country, tracing its heritage back to the 4th millennia BCE.

Ecuador

🇪🇨ECUEcuadorian
At its largest, the empire joined Peru, southwest Ecuador, western and south central Bolivia, northwest Argentina, northern Chile and a small part of southwest Colombia into a state comparable to the historical empires of Eurasia. At its height, the Inca Empire included Peru and Bolivia, most of what is now Ecuador and a large portion of what is today Chile, north of the Maule River.
What is now Ecuador was home to a variety of Amerindian groups that were gradually incorporated into the Inca Empire during the 15th century.

Spanish Empire

SpanishSpainSpanish Crown
Its last stronghold was conquered by the Spanish in 1572.
In the early 16th century, it conquered and incorporated the Aztec and Inca Empires, retaining indigenous elites loyal to the Spanish crown and converts to Christianity as intermediaries between their communities and royal government.

Bolivia

🇧🇴BOLBolivian
At its largest, the empire joined Peru, southwest Ecuador, western and south central Bolivia, northwest Argentina, northern Chile and a small part of southwest Colombia into a state comparable to the historical empires of Eurasia. At its height, the Inca Empire included Peru and Bolivia, most of what is now Ecuador and a large portion of what is today Chile, north of the Maule River.
Before Spanish colonization, the Andean region of Bolivia was part of the Inca Empire, while the northern and eastern lowlands were inhabited by independent tribes.

Neo-Inca State

last Inca strongholdlast stronghold
Its last stronghold was conquered by the Spanish in 1572.
It is considered the remnants of the Inca Empire (1438–1533) after the Spanish conquest.

Andes

AndeanAndes MountainsAndean region
From 1438 to 1533, the Incas incorporated a large portion of western South America, centered on the Andean Mountains, using conquest and peaceful assimilation, among other methods.
The majority consensus is that it derives from the Quechua word anti, which means "east" as in Antisuyu (Quechua for "east region"), one of the four regions of the Inca Empire.

Argentina

🇦🇷ArgentineARG
At its largest, the empire joined Peru, southwest Ecuador, western and south central Bolivia, northwest Argentina, northern Chile and a small part of southwest Colombia into a state comparable to the historical empires of Eurasia.
The last group are farmers with pottery, like the Charrúa, Minuane and Guaraní in the northeast, with slash and burn semisedentary existence; the advanced Diaguita sedentary trading culture in the northwest, which was conquered by the Inca Empire around 1480; the Toconoté and Hênîa and Kâmîare in the country's center, and the Huarpe in the center-west, a culture that raised llama cattle and was strongly influenced by the Incas.

Quechuan languages

QuechuaQuechuanQuechua language
Its official language was Quechua.
It is perhaps most widely known for being the main language family of the Inca Empire.

Colombia

🇨🇴COLColombian
At its largest, the empire joined Peru, southwest Ecuador, western and south central Bolivia, northwest Argentina, northern Chile and a small part of southwest Colombia into a state comparable to the historical empires of Eurasia.
The Incas expanded their empire onto the southwest part of the country.

Chile

🇨🇱ChileanRepublic of Chile
At its largest, the empire joined Peru, southwest Ecuador, western and south central Bolivia, northwest Argentina, northern Chile and a small part of southwest Colombia into a state comparable to the historical empires of Eurasia. At its height, the Inca Empire included Peru and Bolivia, most of what is now Ecuador and a large portion of what is today Chile, north of the Maule River.
According to 17th-century Spanish chronicler Diego de Rosales, the Incas called the valley of the Aconcagua "Chili" by corruption of the name of a Picunche tribal chief ("cacique") called Tili, who ruled the area at the time of the Incan conquest in the 15th century.

Inti

Cult of Inti
Many local forms of worship persisted in the empire, most of them concerning local sacred Huacas, but the Inca leadership encouraged the sun worship of Inti – their sun god – and imposed its sovereignty above other cults such as that of Pachamama.
Worshiped as a patron deity of the Inca Empire, Pachacuti is often linked to the origin and expansion of the Inca Sun Cult.

Sapa Inca

IncaInca EmperorEmperor
The Incas considered their king, the Sapa Inca, to be the "son of the sun." Under the leadership of Manco Cápac, the Inca formed the small city-state Kingdom of Cusco (Quechua Qusqu', Qosqo). In 1438, they began a far-reaching expansion under the command of Sapa Inca (paramount leader) Pachacuti-Cusi Yupanqui, whose name literally meant "earth-shaker".
The Sapa Inca (Hispanicized spelling), Sapan Inka or Sapa Inka (Quechua for "the only Inca"), also known as Apu ("divinity"), Inka Qhapaq ("mighty Inca"), or simply Sapa ("the only one"), was the ruler of the Kingdom of Cusco and, later, the Emperor of the Inca Empire (Tawantinsuyu) and the Neo-Inca State.

Americas

Americathe AmericasAmerican
Its political and administrative structure is considered by most scholars to have been the most developed in the Americas before Columbus' arrival.
The term Pre-Columbian is used especially often in the context of the great indigenous civilizations of the Americas, such as those of Mesoamerica (the Olmec, the Toltec, the Teotihuacano, the Zapotec, the Mixtec, the Aztec, and the Maya) and the Andes (Inca, Moche, Muisca, Cañaris).

Lake Titicaca

TiticacaTiticaca BasinLago Titicaca
The Inca Empire was preceded by two large-scale empires in the Andes: the Tiwanaku (c. 300–1100 AD), based around Lake Titicaca and the Wari or Huari (c. 600–1100 AD) centered near the city of Ayacucho.
Other cultures lived on Lake Titicaca prior to the arrival of the Incas.

Llama

llamascamelidsL. glama
Troll did also argue that llamas, the Inca's pack animal, can be found in its largest numbers in this very same region.
The llama (Lama glama) is a domesticated South American camelid, widely used as a meat and pack animal by Andean cultures since the Pre-Columbian era.

South America

SouthSouth AmericanSouth-
From 1438 to 1533, the Incas incorporated a large portion of western South America, centered on the Andean Mountains, using conquest and peaceful assimilation, among other methods.
Known as Tawantin suyu, and "the land of the four regions," in Quechua, the Inca Empire was highly distinct and developed.

Tiwanaku empire

TiwanakuTiahuanacosTihuanco
The Inca Empire was preceded by two large-scale empires in the Andes: the Tiwanaku (c. 300–1100 AD), based around Lake Titicaca and the Wari or Huari (c. 600–1100 AD) centered near the city of Ayacucho.
One obsolete theory suggests that Tiwanaku was an expansive military empire, based on comparisons to the later Inca Empire, but supporting evidence is weak.

Machu Picchu

Historic Sanctuary of Machu PicchuMachu Pikchu2010 Machu Picchu floods
Pachacuti is thought to have built Machu Picchu, either as a family home or summer retreat, although it may have been an agricultural station.
Machu Picchu ( or ; ; Machu Pikchu ) is a 15th-century Inca citadel, located in the Eastern Cordillera of southern Peru, on a mountain ridge 2430 m above sea level.

Manco Cápac

Manco CapacManqo QhapaqAyar Manco
They were: Ayar Manco, Ayar Cachi, Ayar Awqa (Ayar Auca) and Ayar Uchu; and Mama Ocllo, Mama Raua, Mama Huaco and Mama Qura (Mama Cora).
Manco Cápac (Quechua: Manqu Qhapaq, "the royal founder"), also known as Manco Inca and Ayar Manco was, according to some historians, the first governor and founder of the Inca civilization in Cusco, possibly in the early 13th century.

Chanka

ChancaCh'anka
The name of Pachacuti was given to him after he conquered the Tribe of Chancas (modern Apurímac).
Enemies of the Incas, they were centered primarily in Andahuaylas, located in the modern-day region of Apurímac.

Incas in Central Chile

a large portionconquest of northern ChileInca rule
At its height, the Inca Empire included Peru and Bolivia, most of what is now Ecuador and a large portion of what is today Chile, north of the Maule River.
Inca rule in Chile was brief; it lasted from the 1470s to the 1530s when the Inca Empire collapsed.

Sinchi Roca

Zinchi Roq'a
Before they arrived, Mama Ocllo had already borne Ayar Manco a child, Sinchi Roca.
Sinchi Roca, Sinchi Rocca, Cinchi Roca (in hispanicized spellings), Sinchi Ruq'a or Sinchi Ruq'a Inka (Quechua for "valorous generous Inca") was the second Sapa Inca of the Kingdom of Cusco (beginning around 1230 CE, though as early as 1105 CE according to some) and a member of the Húrin dynasty.

Pachacuti

PachacutecPachacuti Inca YupanquiPachakutiq
Under the leadership of Manco Cápac, the Inca formed the small city-state Kingdom of Cusco (Quechua Qusqu', Qosqo). In 1438, they began a far-reaching expansion under the command of Sapa Inca (paramount leader) Pachacuti-Cusi Yupanqui, whose name literally meant "earth-shaker".
Pachacuti Inca Yupanqui (Pachakutiq Inka Yupanki) was the ninth Sapa Inca (1418–1471/1472) of the Kingdom of Cusco which he transformed into the Inca Empire (Tawantinsuyu).

Battle of the Maule

a battle
Traditional historiography claims the advance south halted after the Battle of the Maule where they met determined resistance from the Mapuche.
The Battle of the Maule was fought between a coalition of Mapuche people of Chile and the Inca Empire of Peru.