Incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China

Chinese invasion of Tibetincorporatedoccupation of TibetAnnexation of Tibetincorporated into the People's Republic of Chinaincorporation of TibetLiberation of TibetTibet was occupied by the People's Republic of China17-Point Agreement1950 Chinese invasion
The incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China (called the "Chinese invasion of Tibet" by the Tibetan Government in Exile; called "Peaceful liberation of Tibet" in China ) was the process by which the People's Republic of China (PRC) gained control of Tibet.wikipedia
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Tibet

TibetanGreater TibetThibet
The incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China (called the "Chinese invasion of Tibet" by the Tibetan Government in Exile; called "Peaceful liberation of Tibet" in China ) was the process by which the People's Republic of China (PRC) gained control of Tibet. These regions came under the control of China after attempts by the Government of Tibet to gain international recognition, efforts to modernize its military, negotiations between the Government of Tibet and the PRC, a military conflict in the Qamdo area of Western Kham in October 1950, and the eventual acceptance of the Seventeen Point Agreement by the Government of Tibet under Chinese pressure in October 1951.
The region maintained its autonomy until 1951 when, following the Battle of Chamdo, Tibet became incorporated into the People's Republic of China, and the previous Tibetan government was abolished in 1959 after a failed uprising.

Tibet Autonomous Region

TibetXizangXizang Province
The Government of Tibet and Tibetan social structure remained in place in the Tibet Autonomous Region under the authority of China until the 1959 Tibetan uprising, when the Dalai Lama fled into exile and after which the Government of Tibet and Tibetan social structures were dissolved. In 1913, shortly after the British invasion of Tibet in 1904, the creation of the position of British Trade Agent at Gyantse and the Xinhai Revolution in 1911, most of the area comprising the present-day Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) (Ü-Tsang and western Kham) became a de facto independent state, independent from the rest of present-day China under a British protectorate, with the rest of the present day TAR coming under Tibetan Government rule by 1917.
It was formally established in 1965 to replace the Tibet Area, an administrative division the People's Republic of China (PRC) took over from the Republic of China (ROC) about five years after the dismissal of the Kashag by the PRC following the 1959 Tibetan uprising, and about 13 years after Tibet's incorporation into the PRC in 1951.

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
The incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China (called the "Chinese invasion of Tibet" by the Tibetan Government in Exile; called "Peaceful liberation of Tibet" in China ) was the process by which the People's Republic of China (PRC) gained control of Tibet.
In 1950, the People's Liberation Army captured Hainan from the ROC and incorporated Tibet.

People's Liberation Army

PLAChinese People's Liberation ArmyChinese Army
India provided some small arms aid and military training, however the People's Liberation Army was much larger, better trained, better led, better equipped, and more experienced than the Tibetan Army.

Tibetan Army

Army of TibetmilitaryTibetan troops
India provided some small arms aid and military training, however the People's Liberation Army was much larger, better trained, better led, better equipped, and more experienced than the Tibetan Army. These regions came under the control of China after attempts by the Government of Tibet to gain international recognition, efforts to modernize its military, negotiations between the Government of Tibet and the PRC, a military conflict in the Qamdo area of Western Kham in October 1950, and the eventual acceptance of the Seventeen Point Agreement by the Government of Tibet under Chinese pressure in October 1951.

British expedition to Tibet

Younghusband ExpeditionBritish invasion of Tibet1904 invasion of Tibet
In 1913, shortly after the British invasion of Tibet in 1904, the creation of the position of British Trade Agent at Gyantse and the Xinhai Revolution in 1911, most of the area comprising the present-day Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) (Ü-Tsang and western Kham) became a de facto independent state, independent from the rest of present-day China under a British protectorate, with the rest of the present day TAR coming under Tibetan Government rule by 1917.
Ineffectual regents ruled during the 14th Dalai Lama's infancy and China began to reassert its control, a process that culminated in 1950–1951 with the Chinese invasion of Tibet by a newly-formed Communist China.

1959 Tibetan uprising

1959 Tibetan RebellionTibetan uprisingLhasa Uprising
The Government of Tibet and Tibetan social structure remained in place in the Tibet Autonomous Region under the authority of China until the 1959 Tibetan uprising, when the Dalai Lama fled into exile and after which the Government of Tibet and Tibetan social structures were dissolved.

Tibet (1912–1951)

TibetTibet (1912–51)Kingdom of Tibet
In 1913, shortly after the British invasion of Tibet in 1904, the creation of the position of British Trade Agent at Gyantse and the Xinhai Revolution in 1911, most of the area comprising the present-day Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) (Ü-Tsang and western Kham) became a de facto independent state, independent from the rest of present-day China under a British protectorate, with the rest of the present day TAR coming under Tibetan Government rule by 1917.
The polity of Tibet from 1912 to 1951 came into being in the aftermath of the collapse of the Qing Empire in 1912, and lasted until the incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China in 1951.

Sinicization of Tibet

Chinese cultural hegemonyCultural genocide in Tibetenormous influx of Chinese settlers
The changes, evident since the incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China in 1950–51, have been facilitated by a range of economic, social, cultural, religious and political reforms introduced to Tibet by the Chinese government.

Monument to the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet

Peaceful Liberation of Tibet
It celebrates what the People's Republic of China calls the "Peaceful Liberation of Tibet" by the People's Liberation Army.

14th Dalai Lama

Dalai LamaTenzin Gyatsothe Dalai Lama
In 1950, the 14th Dalai Lama was 15 years old and had not attained his majority, so Regent Taktra was the acting head of the Tibetan Government.

Fan Ming

Fan Ming (December 4, 1914 – February 23, 2010), born Hao Keyong, was a general of the Chinese People's Liberation Army during the Battle of Chamdo, where Tibet was incorporated into the People's Republic of China.

Seventeen Point Agreement

Seventeen Point Agreement for the Peaceful Liberation of Tibet17-point agreementSeventeen-Point Agreement
These regions came under the control of China after attempts by the Government of Tibet to gain international recognition, efforts to modernize its military, negotiations between the Government of Tibet and the PRC, a military conflict in the Qamdo area of Western Kham in October 1950, and the eventual acceptance of the Seventeen Point Agreement by the Government of Tibet under Chinese pressure in October 1951.

Central Tibetan Administration

Tibetan Government in ExileTibetan government-in-exileGovernment of Tibet in Exile
The incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China (called the "Chinese invasion of Tibet" by the Tibetan Government in Exile; called "Peaceful liberation of Tibet" in China ) was the process by which the People's Republic of China (PRC) gained control of Tibet.

Diplomatic recognition

recognizedrecognitioninternational recognition
These regions came under the control of China after attempts by the Government of Tibet to gain international recognition, efforts to modernize its military, negotiations between the Government of Tibet and the PRC, a military conflict in the Qamdo area of Western Kham in October 1950, and the eventual acceptance of the Seventeen Point Agreement by the Government of Tibet under Chinese pressure in October 1951.

Kham

Eastern TibetKhamsEast Tibet
These regions came under the control of China after attempts by the Government of Tibet to gain international recognition, efforts to modernize its military, negotiations between the Government of Tibet and the PRC, a military conflict in the Qamdo area of Western Kham in October 1950, and the eventual acceptance of the Seventeen Point Agreement by the Government of Tibet under Chinese pressure in October 1951.

Annexation

annexedannexannexing
Scholars call the incorporation a Chinese annexation of Tibet.

Dalai Lama

the Dalai LamaDalai LamasDalai
The Government of Tibet and Tibetan social structure remained in place in the Tibet Autonomous Region under the authority of China until the 1959 Tibetan uprising, when the Dalai Lama fled into exile and after which the Government of Tibet and Tibetan social structures were dissolved.

Gyantse

GyangtseGyangzeGyantse Jong
In 1913, shortly after the British invasion of Tibet in 1904, the creation of the position of British Trade Agent at Gyantse and the Xinhai Revolution in 1911, most of the area comprising the present-day Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) (Ü-Tsang and western Kham) became a de facto independent state, independent from the rest of present-day China under a British protectorate, with the rest of the present day TAR coming under Tibetan Government rule by 1917.

Xinhai Revolution

1911 RevolutionChinese RevolutionChinese Revolution of 1911
In 1913, shortly after the British invasion of Tibet in 1904, the creation of the position of British Trade Agent at Gyantse and the Xinhai Revolution in 1911, most of the area comprising the present-day Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR) (Ü-Tsang and western Kham) became a de facto independent state, independent from the rest of present-day China under a British protectorate, with the rest of the present day TAR coming under Tibetan Government rule by 1917.

Tibetan people

TibetanTibetansethnic Tibetan
Some border areas with high ethnic Tibetan populations (Amdo and Eastern Kham) remained under Chinese Nationalist Party (Kuomintang) or local warlord control.

History of the Kuomintang

Chinese nationalist governmentChinese Nationalist Partysecond revolution
Some border areas with high ethnic Tibetan populations (Amdo and Eastern Kham) remained under Chinese Nationalist Party (Kuomintang) or local warlord control.