Independent Broadcasting Authority

IBAIndependent Broadcasting Acts 1973, 1974 and 1978radio industry regulatorUK commercial radio
The Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was the regulatory body in the United Kingdom for commercial television (ITV and Channel 4 and limited satellite television regulation – cable television was the responsibility of the Cable Authority) – and commercial and independent radio broadcasts.wikipedia
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ITV (TV network)

ITVITV NetworkIndependent Television
The Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was the regulatory body in the United Kingdom for commercial television (ITV and Channel 4 and limited satellite television regulation – cable television was the responsibility of the Cable Authority) – and commercial and independent radio broadcasts.
It was launched in 1955 as Independent Television, under the auspices of the Independent Television Authority (ITA) (later the Independent Broadcasting Authority, after the Sound Broadcasting Act 1972, and currently Ofcom), to provide competition to BBC Television which had been established in 1932.

Channel 4

Channel FourChannel4.comChannel 4 HD
The Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was the regulatory body in the United Kingdom for commercial television (ITV and Channel 4 and limited satellite television regulation – cable television was the responsibility of the Cable Authority) – and commercial and independent radio broadcasts.
Although largely commercially self-funded, it is ultimately publicly owned; originally a subsidiary of the Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA), the station is now owned and operated by Channel Four Television Corporation, a public corporation of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, which was established in 1990 and came into operation in 1993.

National Broadcasting School

Keith Belcher
It established and part-funded a National Broadcasting School to train on-air and engineering staff.
The National Broadcasting School began operating in 1980 as an independent organization supported by the UK's Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) to provide professional training in radio presentation, production and journalism for Independent Local Radio (ILR).

Independent Television Commission

ITCIndependent Broadcasting Authority/Independent Television CommissionThe Independent Television Commission
The Independent Television Commission formally replaced the IBA on 1 January 1991 in regulatory terms; however, the Authority itself was not officially dissolved until 2003. The IBA was disbanded as part of the Broadcasting Act 1990, being replaced on New Year's Day 1991 by the Independent Television Commission (ITC) (which also absorbed the Cable Authority), and the Radio Authority (RAu), which have since been merged with other regulators such as Broadcasting Standards Commission (BSC) and Oftel (Office of Telecommunications) to form one regulator, Ofcom.
The creation of ITC, by the Broadcasting Act 1990 to replace the television regulation functions of the Independent Broadcasting Authority (formed by the Sound Broadcasting Act 1972) and Cable Authority.

Engineering Announcements

For several years until July 1990, the IBA put out a short weekly programme under the title Engineering Announcements, transmitted outside normal programme hours, and not otherwise advertised.
Engineering Announcements for the Radio and Television Trade, sometimes abbreviated to Engineering Announcements, was a weekly magazine of news and information intended for technicians and salespeople in the United Kingdom, produced and transmitted by the Independent Television Authority (and later the Independent Broadcasting Authority) from 23 November 1970 until 31 July 1990.

British Satellite Broadcasting

BSBBritish'' Satellite ''BroadcastingDirect Broadcasting by Satellite
In the late 1980s the IBA was appointed as regulator and transmitter operator for the first DBS (Direct Broadcasting by Satellite) service for the UK and awarded the franchise to BSB (British Satellite Broadcasting).
In the UK, the Independent Broadcasting Authority developed a variant, D-MAC, which had marginal audio channel improvements, and insisted on its use by the satellite service to be licensed by itself.

Associated Television

ATVATV MidlandsATV Music
The IBA was determined each franchise provided the best possible local service, so the South of England transmission region was split in two, with the successful applicant required to provide separate news services for the South and South East, while in the Midlands ATV's commitment to regional output in the Midlands had been a long-running issue for the IBA; in 1980, they were allowed to keep their franchise, but with several tough conditions.
In 1980, the Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) decided that ATV's lack of regional programming and production (it had a major studio centre at Elstree in Hertfordshire, a legacy of its London contract, well outside its Midlands franchise) was hampering the region, so it insisted that the new applicant for the franchise be more clearly based in the region and have separate facilities for the East and West Midlands.

Sky Television (1984–1990)

Sky TelevisionSky Television plcSky TV
In advance of this, the rival Sky Television plc was able to launch an analogue service and intended to overshadow BSB by leasing transponders from Société Européenne des Satellites' RCA Astro-built satellite, Astra 1A.
Haynes first advised Thames Television, the Independent Broadcasting Authority and an industry group before setting up SATV.

Broadcasting Act 1990

1990 Broadcasting ActBroadcasting Act of 1990Broadcasting Bill
The IBA was disbanded as part of the Broadcasting Act 1990, being replaced on New Year's Day 1991 by the Independent Television Commission (ITC) (which also absorbed the Cable Authority), and the Radio Authority (RAu), which have since been merged with other regulators such as Broadcasting Standards Commission (BSC) and Oftel (Office of Telecommunications) to form one regulator, Ofcom.
It led directly to the abolition of the Independent Broadcasting Authority and its replacement with the Independent Television Commission and Radio Authority (both themselves now replaced by Ofcom), which were given the remit of regulating with a "lighter touch" and did not have such strong powers as the IBA; some referred to this as "deregulation".

The $64,000 Question (British game show)

The $64,000 Question$64,000 Question
British versions of popular American quiz shows had to be adjusted – The $64,000 Question having a maximum prize initially of 64,000 sixpences (£1,600) in the late 1950s, and in the early 1990s of just £6,400.
£3,200 was actually substantially higher, in real terms (i.e. accounting for inflation), than anything on offer on British TV for most of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, after the Independent Television Authority (later the Independent Broadcasting Authority) imposed prize limits on game shows after the general discrediting of the genre following the quiz show scandals in the US and rumors that the British version of Twenty One was also corrupt.

Independent Television Authority

ITAIndependent Televisioncommercial television
The IBA came into being when the Sound Broadcasting Act 1972 gave the Independent Television Authority responsibility for organising the new Independent Local Radio (ILR) stations. In 1960, two years after the scandal in America, the Independent Television Authority (predecessor of the IBA) imposed a £1,000 cap on the value of prizes; this increased over the years to £6,000 in 1981, and was abolished in 1993.
See the entry for the IBA for details of the 1981 and 1991-2 franchise rounds.

Arqiva

National Grid WirelessNOW Sussex CoastNTL
These assets are now within the portfolio operated by Arqiva.
It was modelled on ITA, in that programmes were made by local contractors while the regulator, renamed the Independent Broadcasting Authority, owned and operated the transmitters.

United Kingdom Independent Broadcasting

UKIBIndependent Television Companies AssociationUnited Kingdom Independent Broadcasting (UKIB)
The IBA's Membership of the European Broadcasting Union was passed to United Kingdom Independent Broadcasting (UKIB).
It replaced Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA, formerly Independent Television Authority or ITA) as the second British EBU member.

1950s quiz show scandals

quiz show scandalsquiz show scandalscandal
In 1960, two years after the scandal in America, the Independent Television Authority (predecessor of the IBA) imposed a £1,000 cap on the value of prizes; this increased over the years to £6,000 in 1981, and was abolished in 1993.
In 1960, this resulted in the Independent Television Authority's placement of a permanent winnings cap for ITV game shows of £1,000, which the Independent Broadcasting Authority increased to £6,000 in 1981 (though the British version of The $64,000 Question did receive special permission to offer £6,400 when it premiered in 1990).

Emley Moor transmitting station

Emley MoorEmley Moor TowerEmley Moor transmitter
The tower is currently owned by Arqiva, previously the Independent Broadcasting Authority Engineering section, privatised as NTL Broadcast.

John Whitney (broadcaster)

John Whitney
John Whitney (Director General 1982-89),
From 1982 - 1989 Whitney was Director General of the Independent Broadcasting Authority, the UK regulatory authority for commercial TV and radio.

Julian Prictoe

Julian Prictoe,
Prictoe started his career in broadcasting in 1984 within the engineering arm of the UK's Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) along with Nic Robertson.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
The Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was the regulatory body in the United Kingdom for commercial television (ITV and Channel 4 and limited satellite television regulation – cable television was the responsibility of the Cable Authority) – and commercial and independent radio broadcasts.

Commercial broadcasting

commercialcommercial radiocommercial television
The Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was the regulatory body in the United Kingdom for commercial television (ITV and Channel 4 and limited satellite television regulation – cable television was the responsibility of the Cable Authority) – and commercial and independent radio broadcasts.

Television

TVtelevisedtelevisions
The Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was the regulatory body in the United Kingdom for commercial television (ITV and Channel 4 and limited satellite television regulation – cable television was the responsibility of the Cable Authority) – and commercial and independent radio broadcasts.

Cable television

cablecable TVcable channel
The Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was the regulatory body in the United Kingdom for commercial television (ITV and Channel 4 and limited satellite television regulation – cable television was the responsibility of the Cable Authority) – and commercial and independent radio broadcasts.

Cable Authority

The Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was the regulatory body in the United Kingdom for commercial television (ITV and Channel 4 and limited satellite television regulation – cable television was the responsibility of the Cable Authority) – and commercial and independent radio broadcasts.

Radio

radio communicationradio communicationswireless
The Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was the regulatory body in the United Kingdom for commercial television (ITV and Channel 4 and limited satellite television regulation – cable television was the responsibility of the Cable Authority) – and commercial and independent radio broadcasts.

Soap opera

soap operassoapdaytime drama
This direct approach extended to programmes also; the IBA could (and did) place limits on how many soap episodes could be shown per week, if they believed programme quality would be compromised.

Advertising Standards Authority (United Kingdom)

Advertising Standards AuthorityASAAdvertising Standards Agency
As well as setting guidelines on advertising content (some guidelines only, the remainder being the responsibility of the ASA), quantity and timings, the IBA also operated monitoring systems for the quality of programme content and the technical quality of programme play-out.