Indian Plate

IndianIndiaIndia PlateIndian tectonic platecollision between the Indian and Asian continentsIndian continental plateIndian tectonic platesIndoPeninsular Indiathe Indian Plate
The Indian Plate or India Plate is a major tectonic plate straddling the equator in the eastern hemisphere.wikipedia
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South Asia

SouthSouth AsianSouthern Asia
The Indian Plate includes most of South Asia—i.e. the Indian subcontinent—and a portion of the basin under the Indian Ocean, including parts of South China and western Indonesia, and extending up to but not including Ladakh, Kohistan and Balochistan.
Topographically, it is dominated by the Indian Plate, which rises above sea level as Nepal and northern parts of India situated south of the Himalayas and the Hindu Kush.

Australian Plate

AustralianAustraliaAustralian continental plate
Once fused with the adjacent Australia to form a single Indo-Australian Plate, recent studies suggest that India and Australia have been separate plates for at least 3 million years and likely longer.
Originally a part of the ancient continent of Gondwana, Australia remained connected to India and Antarctica until approximately when India broke away and began moving north.

Indian subcontinent

IndiasubcontinentIndian
The Indian Plate includes most of South Asia—i.e. the Indian subcontinent—and a portion of the basin under the Indian Ocean, including parts of South China and western Indonesia, and extending up to but not including Ladakh, Kohistan and Balochistan.
The Indian subcontinent is a southern region and peninsula of Asia, mostly situated on the Indian Plate and projecting southwards into the Indian Ocean from the Himalayas.

Gondwana

GondwanalandGondwanansouthern continents
Originally a part of the ancient continent of Gondwana, India broke away from the other fragments of Gondwana and began moving north. In the late Cretaceous, approximately and subsequent to the splitting off from Gondwana of conjoined Madagascar and India, the Indian Plate split from Madagascar. Until roughly, the Indian Plate formed part of the supercontinent Gondwana together with modern Africa, Australia, Antarctica, and South America.
The Indian Plate and the Australian Plate are now separated by the Capricorn Plate and its diffuse boundaries.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
In the late Cretaceous, approximately and subsequent to the splitting off from Gondwana of conjoined Madagascar and India, the Indian Plate split from Madagascar.
India accounts for the bulk of the Indian subcontinent, lying atop the Indian tectonic plate, a part of the Indo-Australian Plate.

Indian Ocean

IndianIndoSouthern Indian Ocean
The Indian Plate includes most of South Asia—i.e. the Indian subcontinent—and a portion of the basin under the Indian Ocean, including parts of South China and western Indonesia, and extending up to but not including Ladakh, Kohistan and Balochistan.
In the Indian Ocean these spreading ridges meet at the Rodrigues Triple Point with the Central Indian Ridge, including the Carlsberg Ridge, separating the African Plate from the Indian Plate; the Southwest Indian Ridge separating the African Plate from the Antarctic Plate; and the Southeast Indian Ridge separating the Australian Plate from the Antarctic Plate.

Ladakh

LaddakhLadakhiLadakh Division
The Indian Plate includes most of South Asia—i.e. the Indian subcontinent—and a portion of the basin under the Indian Ocean, including parts of South China and western Indonesia, and extending up to but not including Ladakh, Kohistan and Balochistan.
The mountain ranges in this region were formed over 45 million years by the folding of the Indian Plate into the more stationary Eurasian Plate.

Indo-Australian Plate

Indo-AustralianAustralianAustralian Plate
Once fused with the adjacent Australia to form a single Indo-Australian Plate, recent studies suggest that India and Australia have been separate plates for at least 3 million years and likely longer.
Recent studies, and evidence from seismic events such as the 2012 Indian Ocean earthquakes, suggest that the Indo-Australian Plate may have broken up into two or three separate plates due primarily to stresses induced by the collision of the Indo-Australian Plate with Eurasia along what later became the Himalayas, and that the Indian Plate and Australian Plate have been separate since at least.

Arabian Plate

ArabianArabiaArabian Tectonic Plate
The westerly side of the Indian Plate is a transform boundary with the Arabian Plate called the Owen Fracture Zone, and a divergent boundary with the African Plate called the Central Indian Ridge (CIR).
It is one of three continental plates (the African, Arabian, and Indian Plates) that have been moving northward in recent geological history and colliding with the Eurasian Plate.

Owen Fracture Zone

OwenOwen Transform Fault
The westerly side of the Indian Plate is a transform boundary with the Arabian Plate called the Owen Fracture Zone, and a divergent boundary with the African Plate called the Central Indian Ridge (CIR).
The Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ), though misnamed a fracture zone, is a transform fault in the northwest Indian Ocean that separates the Arabian and African Plates from the Indian Plate.

Himalayas

HimalayaHimalayanHimalayan Mountains
The collision with the Eurasian Plate along the boundary between India and Nepal formed the orogenic belt that created the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalaya Mountains, as sediment bunched up like earth before a plow. The northerly side of the Plate is a convergent boundary with the Eurasian Plate forming the Himalaya and Hindu Kush mountains.
Lifted by the subduction of the Indian tectonic plate under the Eurasian Plate, the Himalayan mountain range runs west-northwest to east-southeast in an arc 2400 km long.

Convergent boundary

convergent plate boundaryconvergenceconvergent boundaries
The northerly side of the Plate is a convergent boundary with the Eurasian Plate forming the Himalaya and Hindu Kush mountains.

Eurasian Plate

EurasianEuropean plateAsian Plate
The collision with the Eurasian Plate along the boundary between India and Nepal formed the orogenic belt that created the Tibetan Plateau and the Himalaya Mountains, as sediment bunched up like earth before a plow. The northerly side of the Plate is a convergent boundary with the Eurasian Plate forming the Himalaya and Hindu Kush mountains.
The geodynamics of central Asia is dominated by the interaction between the Eurasian and Indian Plates.

Seychelles microcontinent

Seychelles Plate
Thermally-induced rifting in the Somali Basin and transform rifting along the Davie fracture zone began in the late Permian 225 million years ago, with Gondwana supercontinent beginning to break up in the mid-Jurassic (about 167 million years ago) when East Gondwana, comprising Antarctica, Madagascar, India, and Australia, began to separate from Africa; East Gondwana then began to separate about 115–120 million years ago when India began to move northward.

Eastern Hemisphere

EasternEastEast Hemisphere
The Indian Plate or India Plate is a major tectonic plate straddling the equator in the eastern hemisphere.

Southwest China

southwestern ChinaSouthwestsouthwestern
The Indian Plate includes most of South Asia—i.e. the Indian subcontinent—and a portion of the basin under the Indian Ocean, including parts of South China and western Indonesia, and extending up to but not including Ladakh, Kohistan and Balochistan.

Indonesia

Republic of IndonesiaIndonesianIndonesian Republic
The Indian Plate includes most of South Asia—i.e. the Indian subcontinent—and a portion of the basin under the Indian Ocean, including parts of South China and western Indonesia, and extending up to but not including Ladakh, Kohistan and Balochistan.

Kohistan District, Pakistan

KohistanKohistan DistrictKohistanis
The Indian Plate includes most of South Asia—i.e. the Indian subcontinent—and a portion of the basin under the Indian Ocean, including parts of South China and western Indonesia, and extending up to but not including Ladakh, Kohistan and Balochistan.

Balochistan

BaluchistanBalochistan regionBaloch
The Indian Plate includes most of South Asia—i.e. the Indian subcontinent—and a portion of the basin under the Indian Ocean, including parts of South China and western Indonesia, and extending up to but not including Ladakh, Kohistan and Balochistan.

Supercontinent

supercontinentspaleocontinentssuper continent
Until roughly, the Indian Plate formed part of the supercontinent Gondwana together with modern Africa, Australia, Antarctica, and South America.

Cretaceous

Cretaceous PeriodMiddle CretaceousEarly Cretaceous
In the late Cretaceous, approximately and subsequent to the splitting off from Gondwana of conjoined Madagascar and India, the Indian Plate split from Madagascar.

Madagascar

MalagasyMadagascanMalagasy politician
In the late Cretaceous, approximately and subsequent to the splitting off from Gondwana of conjoined Madagascar and India, the Indian Plate split from Madagascar.

Eocene

Late EoceneMiddle EoceneEocene Epoch
It began moving north, at about 20 cm per year, and is believed to have begun colliding with Asia as early as, in the Eocene epoch of the Cenozoic.

Cenozoic

Cenozoic EraCainozoicAge of Mammals
It began moving north, at about 20 cm per year, and is believed to have begun colliding with Asia as early as, in the Eocene epoch of the Cenozoic.

Paleomagnetism

paleomagneticpalaeomagnetismpalaeomagnetic
In 2012, paleomagnetic data from the Greater Himalaya was used to propose two collisions to reconcile the discrepancy between the amount of crustal shortening in the Himalaya (~1300 km) and the amount of convergence between India and Asia (~3600 km).