Indian cuisine

IndianIndiaIndian restaurantIndian foodNorth IndianIndian cookingIndian dishcuisinefoodIndian chef
Indian cuisine consists of a wide variety of regional and traditional cuisines native to the Indian subcontinent.wikipedia
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British cuisine

BritishUnited KingdomBritain
Indian cuisine has influenced other cuisines across the world, especially those from Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, the British Isles, Fiji, and the Caribbean.
The British Empire facilitated a knowledge of Indian cuisine with its "strong, penetrating spices and herbs".

Pilaf

pulaoplovpilav
Samosas and pilafs can be regarded as examples.
It is a staple food and a popular dish in Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Israel, Crete, India, Iran, Kazakhstan, Romania, Russia, Kurdistan, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Pakistan, Kenya, Tanzania, Zanzibar, Uganda, Tajikistan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Xinjiang, and Uzbekistan.

Caribbean cuisine

CaribbeanCaribbean dishescuisine of the Caribbean
Indian cuisine has influenced other cuisines across the world, especially those from Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, the British Isles, Fiji, and the Caribbean.
Caribbean cuisine is a fusion of African, Creole, Cajun, Amerindian, European, Latin American, East/North Indian, Middle Eastern, and Chinese.

Gram flour

chickpea flourbesanBengal gram flour
Channa and moong are also processed into flour (besan). Specific dishes include kadhi, pakora, besan masala roti, bajra aloo roti, churma, kheer, bathua raita, methi gajar, singri ki sabzi, and tamatar chutney.
It is a staple ingredient in the cuisine of the Indian subcontinent, including in Indian, Bangladeshi, Burmese, Nepali, Pakistani and Sri Lankan cuisines.

Columbian exchange

occurred with the discovery of the New Worldintroducedadvent of new culinary elements
The most important and frequently used spices and flavourings in Indian cuisine are whole or powdered chilli pepper (mirch, introduced by the Portuguese from Mexico in the 16th century), black mustard seed (sarso), cardamom (elaichi), cumin (jeera), turmeric (haldi), asafoetida (hing), ginger (adrak), coriander (dhania), and garlic (lasoon). One popular spice mix is garam masala, a powder that typically includes seven dried spices in a particular ratio, including black cardamom, cinnamon (dalchini), clove (laung), cumin (jeera), black peppercorns, coriander seeds and anise star.
Introduced to India by the Portuguese, chili and potatoes from South America have become an integral part of Indian cuisine.

Curry

curriesbhunacurry sauce
Black pepper is native to the Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia and has been known to Indian cooking since at least 2000 BCE.

Spice mix

masalaspice mixtureList of spice mixes
The most important and frequently used spices and flavourings in Indian cuisine are whole or powdered chilli pepper (mirch, introduced by the Portuguese from Mexico in the 16th century), black mustard seed (sarso), cardamom (elaichi), cumin (jeera), turmeric (haldi), asafoetida (hing), ginger (adrak), coriander (dhania), and garlic (lasoon). One popular spice mix is garam masala, a powder that typically includes seven dried spices in a particular ratio, including black cardamom, cinnamon (dalchini), clove (laung), cumin (jeera), black peppercorns, coriander seeds and anise star. Specific dishes include kadhi, pakora, besan masala roti, bajra aloo roti, churma, kheer, bathua raita, methi gajar, singri ki sabzi, and tamatar chutney.
Masalas are used extensively in Indian cuisine to add spice and flavour, most familiarly in chicken tikka masala and chicken curry.

History of India

ancient IndiaIndiaIndian
Indian cuisine reflects an 8,000-year history of various groups and cultures interacting with the Indian subcontinent, leading to diversity of flavours and regional cuisines found in modern-day India.
Hindu and Buddhist religious establishments of Southeast Asia came to be associated with the economic activity and commerce as patrons entrust large funds which would later be used to benefit the local economy by estate management, craftsmanship, promotion of trading activities. Buddhism in particular, travelled alongside the maritime trade, promoting coinage, art, and literacy. Indian merchants involved in spice trade took Indian cuisine to Southeast Asia, where spice mixtures and curries became popular with the native inhabitants.

Roti

roomali rotisrutichappathi
People enjoy home-made recipes such as parantha, especially at breakfast, and other Punjabi foods like roti which is made from wheat, corn, or other glutenous flour with cooked vegetables or beans.
Roti is consumed in India, Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Singapore, Maldives, Malaysia and Bangladesh.

Mung bean

green grammung beansmoong
Staple foods of Indian cuisine include pearl millet (bājra), rice, whole-wheat flour (aṭṭa), and a variety of lentils, such as masoor (most often red lentils), tuer (pigeon peas), urad (black gram), and moong (mung beans).
Mung beans in some regional cuisines of India are stripped of their outer coats to make mung dal.

Dairy product

dairy productsdairymilk products
Early diet in India mainly consisted of legumes, vegetables, fruits, grains, dairy products, and honey.
Khoa, milk which has been completely concentrated by evaporation, used in Indian cuisine including gulab jamun, peda, etc.

Chickpea

chickpeaschick peachick peas
Some pulses, such as channa or cholae (chickpeas), rajma (kidney beans), and lobiya (black-eyed peas) are very common, especially in the northern regions.
The chickpea is important in Indian and Middle Eastern cuisine and in 2016, India produced 64% of the world's total chickpeas.

Garam masala

gorom moshlamasala
The most important and frequently used spices and flavourings in Indian cuisine are whole or powdered chilli pepper (mirch, introduced by the Portuguese from Mexico in the 16th century), black mustard seed (sarso), cardamom (elaichi), cumin (jeera), turmeric (haldi), asafoetida (hing), ginger (adrak), coriander (dhania), and garlic (lasoon). One popular spice mix is garam masala, a powder that typically includes seven dried spices in a particular ratio, including black cardamom, cinnamon (dalchini), clove (laung), cumin (jeera), black peppercorns, coriander seeds and anise star.
A typical Indian version of garam masala contains:

Pakora

bhajibhajjipakoda
Specific dishes include kadhi, pakora, besan masala roti, bajra aloo roti, churma, kheer, bathua raita, methi gajar, singri ki sabzi, and tamatar chutney.
It's also often found in Indian restaurants in the Western world.

Nutmeg

macenutmeg and maceNutmeg butter
Sweet dishes are often seasoned with cardamom, saffron, nutmeg, and rose petal essences.
In Indian cuisine, nutmeg is used in many sweet, as well as savoury, dishes (predominantly in Mughlai cuisine).

Soan papdi

Patisasohan papdiSon Papdi
The Jammu region is famous for its Sund Panjeeri, Patisa, Rajma ( Kidney Beans) with rice and Kalari cheese.
Soan papdi (also known as patisa, son papri, sohan papdi or shonpapri) is a popular Indian dessert.

Ginger

ginger rootZingiberis Rhizomagingers
The most important and frequently used spices and flavourings in Indian cuisine are whole or powdered chilli pepper (mirch, introduced by the Portuguese from Mexico in the 16th century), black mustard seed (sarso), cardamom (elaichi), cumin (jeera), turmeric (haldi), asafoetida (hing), ginger (adrak), coriander (dhania), and garlic (lasoon). One popular spice mix is garam masala, a powder that typically includes seven dried spices in a particular ratio, including black cardamom, cinnamon (dalchini), clove (laung), cumin (jeera), black peppercorns, coriander seeds and anise star.
The juice from ginger roots is often used as a seasoning in Indian recipes and is a common ingredient of Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Vietnamese, and many South Asian cuisines for flavoring dishes such as seafood, meat, and vegetarian dishes.

Coriander

cilantrocoriander seedcoriander seeds
The most important and frequently used spices and flavourings in Indian cuisine are whole or powdered chilli pepper (mirch, introduced by the Portuguese from Mexico in the 16th century), black mustard seed (sarso), cardamom (elaichi), cumin (jeera), turmeric (haldi), asafoetida (hing), ginger (adrak), coriander (dhania), and garlic (lasoon). One popular spice mix is garam masala, a powder that typically includes seven dried spices in a particular ratio, including black cardamom, cinnamon (dalchini), clove (laung), cumin (jeera), black peppercorns, coriander seeds and anise star.
Coriander seed is a spice in garam masala and Indian curries which often employ the ground fruits in generous amounts together with cumin, acting as a thickener in a mixture called dhana jeera.

British people

BritishUnited KingdomBritons
Later, trade with British and Portuguese influence added to the already diverse Indian cuisine.
The British Empire facilitated a knowledge of India's food tradition of "strong, penetrating spices and herbs".

Haryana

Haryana StateHarayanaHaryana region
Chandigarh, the capital of Punjab and Haryana is a city of 20th century origin with a cosmopolitan food culture mainly involving North Indian cuisine.
81% people of Haryana are vegetarian, and cuisine of Haryana is based on fresh, earthy and wholesome ethos of its agrarian culture, where staples are roti, saag, vegetarian sabzi and abundance of milk products such as homemade nooni or tindi ghee, ghee (clarified butter), milk, lassi, kheer.

Curry tree

curry leavescurry leafMurraya koenigii
The use of curry leaves and roots for flavouring is typical of Gujarati and South Indian cuisine.
The leaves are valued as seasoning in southern and west-coast Indian cooking, usually fried along with vegetable oil, mustard seeds and chopped onions in the first stage of the preparation.

Idiyappam

putu mayamstring hoppersNoolputtu
Kerala also has a variety of breakfast dishes like idli, dosa, appam, idiyappam, puttu, and pathiri.
The food, popular in Sri Lanka and India, also spread to Southeast Asia, where it is called putu mayam in Malaysian and putu mayang in Indonesian.

Shrikhand

shreekhand
Shrikhand, a sweet dish made from strained yogurt, is a main dessert of Maharashtrian cuisine.
Shrikhand is an Indian sweet dish made of strained dahi (yogurt).

Flattened rice

Pohabeaten ricepohe
The culinary specialty of the Malwa and Indore regions of central Madhya Pradesh is poha (flattened rice); usually eaten at breakfast with jalebi.
This easily digestible form of raw rice is very popular across India, Nepal and Bangladesh, and is normally used to prepare snacks or light and easy fast food in a variety of Indian cuisine styles, some even for long-term consumption of a week or more.

Rajma

red kidney beans
Some pulses, such as channa or cholae (chickpeas), rajma (kidney beans), and lobiya (black-eyed peas) are very common, especially in the northern regions. The Jammu region is famous for its Sund Panjeeri, Patisa, Rajma ( Kidney Beans) with rice and Kalari cheese.
Indian cuisine