Indian religions

Dharmic religionsIndian religionreligionIndianDharmic traditionsreligionsIndian faithIndian religiousDharmicIndic religions
Indian religions, sometimes also termed Dharmic religions, are the religions that originated in the Indian subcontinent; namely Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism.wikipedia
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Hinduism

HinduHindusHindu culture
Indian religions, sometimes also termed Dharmic religions, are the religions that originated in the Indian subcontinent; namely Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism.
It is an Indian religion and dharma, or way of life, widely practised in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia.

Eastern religions

Eastern religionEasternoriental religion
These religions are also all classified as Eastern religions.
This includes the East Asian religions (Shintoism, Sindoism, Taoism and Confucianism), Indian religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Jainism) as well as animistic indigenous religions.

Sikhism

SikhSikhsSikh religion
Indian religions, sometimes also termed Dharmic religions, are the religions that originated in the Indian subcontinent; namely Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism.
Sikhism is classified as an Indian religion along with Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism.

Jainism

JainJainsJaina
Indian religions, sometimes also termed Dharmic religions, are the religions that originated in the Indian subcontinent; namely Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism. Jainism and Buddhism belong to the sramana tradition. The 24th Tirthankara of Jainism, Mahavira, stressed five vows, including ahimsa (non-violence), satya (truthfulness), asteya (non-stealing) and aparigraha (non-attachment).
Jainism, traditionally known as Jain Dharma, is an ancient Indian religion.

Religion

religiousreligionsreligious beliefs
These religions are also all classified as Eastern religions.
In the field of comparative religion, a common geographical classification of the main world religions includes Middle Eastern religions (including Zoroastrianism and Iranian religions), Indian religions, East Asian religions, African religions, American religions, Oceanic religions, and classical Hellenistic religions.

Religious text

scripturescripturesHoly Scripture
The Agamas are a collection of Tamil and later Sanskrit scriptures chiefly constituting the methods of temple construction and creation of murti, worship means of deities, philosophical doctrines, meditative practices, attainment of sixfold desires and four kinds of yoga.
The terms 'sacred text' and 'religious text' are not necessarily interchangeable in that some religious texts are believed to be sacred because of the belief in some theistic religions such as the Abrahamic religions that the text is divinely or supernaturally revealed or divinely inspired, or in non-theistic religions such as some Indian religions they are considered to be the central tenets of their eternal Dharma.

Satya

SatTruthanirta
Central concepts in the Vedas are Satya and Rta. The 24th Tirthankara of Jainism, Mahavira, stressed five vows, including ahimsa (non-violence), satya (truthfulness), asteya (non-stealing) and aparigraha (non-attachment).
It also refers to a virtue in Indian religions, referring to being truthful in one's thought, speech and action.

Indus Valley Civilisation

Indus Valley CivilizationHarappanIndus Valley
The Harappan people of the Indus Valley Civilisation, which lasted from 3300 to 1300 BCE (mature period 2600–1900 BCE), had an early urbanized culture which predates the Vedic religion.
The religion and belief system of the Indus Valley people have received considerable attention, especially from the view of identifying precursors to deities and religious practices of Indian religions that later developed in the area.

Saṃsāra

samsaracycle of rebirthSansara
However, both branches shared the related concepts of Yoga, saṃsāra (the cycle of birth and death) and moksha (liberation from that cycle). All four traditions have notions of karma, dharma, samsara, moksha and various forms of Yoga.
It is also the concept of rebirth and "cyclicality of all life, matter, existence", a fundamental belief of most Indian religions.

Yoga

yogicyogiYog
However, both branches shared the related concepts of Yoga, saṃsāra (the cycle of birth and death) and moksha (liberation from that cycle). The early Upanishads all predate the Common Era, five of the eleven principal Upanishads were composed in all likelihood before 6th century BCE, and contain the earliest mentions of Yoga and Moksha. All four traditions have notions of karma, dharma, samsara, moksha and various forms of Yoga.
Yoga is practised with a variety of methods by all Indian religions.

Śramaṇa

SramanaShramanaSramanic
Jainism and Buddhism belong to the sramana tradition.
The śramaṇa movements arose in the same circles of mendicants in ancient India that led to the development of yogic practices, as well as the popular concepts in all major Indian religions such as saṃsāra (the cycle of birth and death) and moksha (liberation from that cycle).

Jainism in India

JainismJainsIndia
Historical roots of Jainism in India is traced back to 9th-century BC with the rise of Parshvanatha and his non-violent philosophy.
Jain doctrine teaches that Jainism has always existed and will always exist, Like most ancient Indian religions, Jainism has its roots from the Indus Valley Civilization, reflecting native spirituality prior to the Indo-Aryan migration into India.

Mandala

mandalasmaṇḍalamandalic
"The great king was remote, was exalted and deified", as reflected in the Tantric Mandala, which could also depict the king as the centre of the mandala.
A mandala (emphasis on first syllable; Sanskrit मण्डल, maṇḍala – literally "circle") is a spiritual and/or ritual geometric configuration of symbols or a map (in Shintoism) in the Indian religions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism or Japanese religion of Shintoism representing deities, or in the case of Shintoism, paradises, kami or actual shrines.

Yajurveda

Krishna YajurvedaYajur VedaShukla Yajurveda
The mode of worship was the performance of Yajna, sacrifices which involved sacrifice and sublimation of the havana sámagri (herbal preparations) in the fire, accompanied by the singing of Samans and 'mumbling' of Yajus, the sacrificial mantras.
The text is a treatise on Ātman (Soul, Self), with passages on metaphysics, ethics and a yearning for knowledge that influenced various Indian religions, ancient and medieval scholars.

Dharma

DhammaDharmicdharmas
All four traditions have notions of karma, dharma, samsara, moksha and various forms of Yoga.
dhamma) is a key concept with multiple meanings in Indian religions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and others.

Karma

karmicKarmaskamma
All four traditions have notions of karma, dharma, samsara, moksha and various forms of Yoga.
The philosophy of karma is closely associated with the idea of rebirth in many schools of Indian religions (particularly Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism ) as well as Taoism.

Abhiṣeka

abhishekaabhishekamabhiseka
The head-anointing ritual of abhiseka is of importance in three of these distinct traditions, excluding Sikhism (in Buddhism it is found within Vajrayana).
Within this range of senses, abhiṣeka is common to Indian religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.

Buddhism

BuddhistBuddhistsBuddhadharma
Indian religions, sometimes also termed Dharmic religions, are the religions that originated in the Indian subcontinent; namely Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism. Jainism and Buddhism belong to the sramana tradition.
Buddhism is an Indian religion attributed to the teachings of the Buddha, supposedly born Siddhārtha Gautama, and also known as the Tathāgata ("thus-gone") and Sakyamuni ("sage of the Sakyas").

Indo-Aryan peoples

Indo-AryanIndo-AryansAryans
The documented history of Indian religions begins with the historical Vedic religion, the religious practices of the early Indo-Aryans, which were collected and later redacted into the Samhitas (usually known as the Vedas), four canonical collections of hymns or mantras composed in archaic Sanskrit.

Abrahamic religions

AbrahamicAbrahamic religionAbrahamic faiths
Today the Abrahamic religions are one of the major divisions in comparative religion (along with Indian, Iranian, and East Asian religions).

Ashoka

AsokaAshoka the GreatEmperor Ashoka
The Buddha was born at Lumbini, as emperor Ashoka's Lumbini pillar records, just before the kingdom of Magadha (which traditionally is said to have lasted from c. 546–324 BCE) rose to power.
The word "Dharma" has various connotations in the Indian religions, and can be generally translated as "law, duty, or righteousness".

Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan

S. RadhakrishnanRadhakrishnanSarvapalli Radhakrishnan
While Radhakrishnan, Oldenberg and Neumann were convinced of Upanishadic influence on the Buddhist canon, Eliot and Thomas highlighted the points where Buddhism was opposed to Upanishads.
This led him to his critical study of Indian philosophy and religion and a lifelong defence of Hinduism against "uninformed Western criticism".

Indology

IndologistIndologistsSouth Asian Studies
Specifically, Indology includes the study of Sanskrit literature and Hinduism along with the other Indian religions, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Pāli literature.

Ahimsa in Jainism

ahimsaahiṃsānon-violence
The 24th Tirthankara of Jainism, Mahavira, stressed five vows, including ahimsa (non-violence), satya (truthfulness), asteya (non-stealing) and aparigraha (non-attachment).
, an important tenet of all the religions originating in India, is now considered as an article of faith by the adherents of the Indian religions.

Tribal religions in India

tribal religionsfolk religionsreligions
In keeping with the nature of Indian religion generally, these particular religions often involve traditions of ancestor worship or worship of spirits of natural features.