Indonesian cuisine

IndonesianIndonesiaIndonesian dishesIndonesian foodcuisine of IndonesiaIndonesian dishcuisinelocal Indonesianbasa gedeBubur kacang hijau
Indonesian cuisine consists of the various regional cuisines in parts of Indonesia; there are a wide variety of recipes and cuisines in part because Indonesia is composed of approximately 6,000 populated islands of the total 17,508 in the world's largest archipelago, with more than 300 ethnic groups calling Indonesia home.wikipedia
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Bakso

Bakwan MalangBeef Meatballmeat balls
Elements of Chinese cuisine can be seen in Indonesian cuisine: foods such as noodles, meat balls, and spring rolls have been completely assimilated.
Bakso or baso is an Indonesian meatball, or a meat paste made from beef surimi.

Lumpia

lumpia wrapperloempialumpia goreng
Elements of Chinese cuisine can be seen in Indonesian cuisine: foods such as noodles, meat balls, and spring rolls have been completely assimilated.
Lumpia is a spring roll commonly found in Indonesia and the Philippines.

Javanese cuisine

JavaneseJavaJavanese dish
Sumatran cuisine, for example, often has Middle Eastern and Indian influences, featuring curried meat and vegetables such as gulai and curry, while Javanese cuisine is mostly indigenous, with some hint of Chinese influence.
Some Indonesians perceive Javanese cuisine as sweeter compared to other Indonesian dishes, because of the liberal use of gula jawa (palm sugar) or kecap manis (sweet soy sauce).

Bumbu (seasoning)

bumbuspice mixtureBasa gede
Indonesian cuisine often demonstrates complex flavour, acquired from certain ingredients and bumbu spices mixture.
It is a characteristic of Indonesian cuisine and its regional variants such as Balinese, Javanese, Sundanese, Padang, Batak and Manado cuisines.

Soto (food)

sotoCotosoto betawi
Some popular Indonesian dishes such as nasi goreng, gado-gado, Satay, and soto are ubiquitous in the country and considered as national dishes.
Soto (also known as sroto, tauto, or coto) is a traditional Indonesian soup mainly composed of broth, meat, and vegetables.

Nasi goreng

Indonesian fried rice dishnas''i ''gor''engNasi goreng kambing
Some popular Indonesian dishes such as nasi goreng, gado-gado, Satay, and soto are ubiquitous in the country and considered as national dishes. It is also served, however, as nasi uduk (rice cooked in coconut milk), nasi kuning (rice cooked with coconut milk and turmeric), ketupat (rice steamed in woven packets of coconut fronds), lontong (rice steamed in banana leaves), intip or rengginang (rice crackers), desserts, vermicelli, noodles, arak beras (rice wine), and nasi goreng (fried rice).
Nasi goreng ( English pronunciation: ), literally meaning "fried rice" in Indonesian, is an Indonesian rice dish with pieces of meat and vegetables added.

Gado-gado

gado gadolotek
Some popular Indonesian dishes such as nasi goreng, gado-gado, Satay, and soto are ubiquitous in the country and considered as national dishes.
Gado-gado (Indonesian or Betawi), also known as lotek (Sundanese and Javanese), is an Indonesian salad of slightly boiled, blanched or steamed vegetables and hard-boiled eggs, boiled potato, fried tofu and tempeh, and lontong (rice wrapped in a banana leaf), served with a peanut sauce dressing.

Satay

sateBarbecueKajang Satay
Some popular Indonesian dishes such as nasi goreng, gado-gado, Satay, and soto are ubiquitous in the country and considered as national dishes.
The country's diversity (see Indonesian cuisine) has produced a wide variety of satays.

Batak cuisine

BatakBatak dishBatak snack
On the other hand, the indigenous inhabitant that resides inland—such as the Bataks and Dayaks, retains their older Austronesian culinary traditions, which incorporate bushmeat, pork and blood in their daily diet.
Batak cuisine is part of Indonesian cuisine, and compared to other Sumatran cuisine traditions, it is more indigenously preserved.

Tumpeng

nasi tumpeng
The official national dish of Indonesia however, is tumpeng, chosen in 2014 by Indonesian Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy as the dish that binds the diversity of Indonesia's various culinary traditions.
In 2013, the Indonesian Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy promoted tumpeng as one of 30 Indonesian culinary icons and gave it the status of official national dish of Indonesia in 2014, describing it as "the dish that binds the diversity of Indonesian various culinary traditions."

Urap

urabSayur Uraburapan kasultan
Also various kuluban (boiled vegetables served in spices, similar with today urap) and phalamula (boiled yams and tubers served with liquid palm sugar).
It is commonly found in Indonesian cuisine, more precisely Javanese cuisine.

Ayam goreng

fried chickenAyam Goreng Sulawesi
In restaurants or households that commonly use bare hands to eat, such as seafood food stalls, traditional Sundanese and Minangkabau restaurants, or East Javanese pecel lele (fried catfish with sambal) and ayam goreng (fried chicken) food stalls, kobokan is usually served along with the food.
Ayam goreng is an Indonesian dish of chicken deep fried in coconut oil.

Krupuk

kerupukkeropokBánh Phồng Tôm
Among others are pecel, pindang, rarawwan (rawon), rurujak (rujak), kurupuk (krupuk), sweets like wajik and dodol, also beverages like dawet.
They are a popular snack in parts of Southeast Asia, but most closely associated with Indonesia.

Nutmeg

macenutmeg and maceNutmeg butter
The Indonesian islands The Moluccas (Maluku), which are famed as "the Spice Islands", also contributed to the introduction of native spices, such as cloves and nutmeg, to Indonesian and global cuisine.
In Indonesian cuisine, nutmeg is used in various dishes, mainly in many spicy soups, such as some variant of soto, konro, oxtail soup, sup iga (ribs soup), bakso and sup kambing.

Rengginang

Ranginang
It is also served, however, as nasi uduk (rice cooked in coconut milk), nasi kuning (rice cooked with coconut milk and turmeric), ketupat (rice steamed in woven packets of coconut fronds), lontong (rice steamed in banana leaves), intip or rengginang (rice crackers), desserts, vermicelli, noodles, arak beras (rice wine), and nasi goreng (fried rice).
Rengginang or ranginang is a kind of Indonesian thick rice cracker, made from cooked glutinous sticky rice and seasoned with spices, made into a flat and rounded shape, and then sun-dried.

Tofu

bean curdbeancurdsilken tofu
Soy-based dishes, such as variations of tofu and tempeh, are also very popular.
Tofu is called tahu in Indonesia, and Indonesian dishes such as tahu sumbat, taugeh tahu, asinan, siomay and some curries, often add slices of tofu.

Nasi kuning

yellow rice
It is also served, however, as nasi uduk (rice cooked in coconut milk), nasi kuning (rice cooked with coconut milk and turmeric), ketupat (rice steamed in woven packets of coconut fronds), lontong (rice steamed in banana leaves), intip or rengginang (rice crackers), desserts, vermicelli, noodles, arak beras (rice wine), and nasi goreng (fried rice).
Nasi kuning (Indonesian for: "yellow rice"), or sometimes called nasi kunyit (Indonesian for: "turmeric rice"), is an Indonesian fragrant rice dish cooked with coconut milk and turmeric, hence the name nasi kuning (yellow rice).

Bakmi

bamiemeat noodlenoodles
Elements of Chinese cuisine can be seen in Indonesian cuisine: foods such as noodles, meat balls, and spring rolls have been completely assimilated.
Chinese influences is evident in Indonesian food, such as bakmi, mie ayam, pangsit, mie goreng, and kwetiau goreng.

Nasi Padang

A practice commonly found in nasi campur, nasi Padang, or during a buffet.
Nasi Padang (Padang-style rice) is a miniature banquet of meats, fish, vegetables, and spicy sambals eaten with plain white rice, it is Sumatra's most famous export and the Minangkabau people's great contribution to Indonesian cuisine.

Pecel Lele

In restaurants or households that commonly use bare hands to eat, such as seafood food stalls, traditional Sundanese and Minangkabau restaurants, or East Javanese pecel lele (fried catfish with sambal) and ayam goreng (fried chicken) food stalls, kobokan is usually served along with the food.
Pecel Lele or Pecak lele is a deep fried Clarias catfish dish commonly found in Indonesia.

Sayur asem

Kuah asamsayur asam
Other vegetables like calabash, chayote, kelor, yardlong bean, eggplant, gambas and belustru, are cut and used in stir fries, curries and soups like sayur asem, sayur lodeh or laksa.
Sayur asem or sayur asam is a popular Indonesian vegetable in tamarind soup.

Chinese Indonesian cuisine

Chinese IndonesianChineseChinese-Indonesian
The similar mixed vegetables are also stir fried as cap cai, a popular dish of the Chinese Indonesian cuisine.
Chinese Indonesian cuisine (Masakan Tionghoa Indonesia) is characterized by the mixture of Chinese with local Indonesian style.

Gulai

Gulai KambingGulai Nangkagule kambing
Sumatran cuisine, for example, often has Middle Eastern and Indian influences, featuring curried meat and vegetables such as gulai and curry, while Javanese cuisine is mostly indigenous, with some hint of Chinese influence.
Gulai is originated in Sumatra, Indonesia and is thought to be the local adaptation of Indian curry, developed and derived from Indian influence on Indonesian cuisine.

Daun ubi tumbuk

Daun ubi tumbuk is pounded cassava leaves dish, commonly found in Sumatra, Kalimantan and Sulawesi.
Daun ubi tumbuk (Indonesian for "pounded cassava leaves") is a vegetable dish commonly found in Indonesia, made from pounded cassava leaves.

Sayur lodeh

lodehLontong
Other vegetables like calabash, chayote, kelor, yardlong bean, eggplant, gambas and belustru, are cut and used in stir fries, curries and soups like sayur asem, sayur lodeh or laksa.
Sayur lodeh is a vegetable soup prepared from vegetables in coconut milk popular in Indonesia, but most often associated with Javanese cuisine.