Indoor tanning

tanning bedtanning salontanning boothtanning bedssunbedsolariumsunbedssun bedsun lampsunlamps
Indoor tanning involves using a device that emits ultraviolet radiation to produce a cosmetic tan.wikipedia
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Sun tanning

sunbathingtanningtan
Indoor tanning involves using a device that emits ultraviolet radiation to produce a cosmetic tan.
It is most often a result of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from sunlight or from artificial sources, such as a tanning lamp found in indoor tanning beds.

Skin cancer

non-melanoma skin cancerskinskin neoplasm
Indoor tanning is a source of UV radiation, which is known to cause skin cancer, including melanoma and skin aging, and is associated with sunburn, photodrug reactions, infections, weakening of the immune system, and damage to the eyes, including cataracts, photokeratitis (snow blindness) and eye cancer. While it causes skin cancer and other damage, including wrinkles, it also triggers the synthesis of vitamin D and endorphins in the skin. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), whether from the sun or tanning devices is known to be a major cause of the three main types of skin cancer: non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma) and melanoma.
Tanning beds are becoming another common source of ultraviolet radiation.

Melanoma

malignant melanomametastatic melanomamelanomas
Indoor tanning is a source of UV radiation, which is known to cause skin cancer, including melanoma and skin aging, and is associated with sunburn, photodrug reactions, infections, weakening of the immune system, and damage to the eyes, including cataracts, photokeratitis (snow blindness) and eye cancer. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), whether from the sun or tanning devices is known to be a major cause of the three main types of skin cancer: non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma) and melanoma.
Use of sunbeds (with deeply penetrating UVA rays) has been linked to the development of skin cancers, including melanoma.

Photokeratitis

snow blindnessarc eyesnow-blindness
Indoor tanning is a source of UV radiation, which is known to cause skin cancer, including melanoma and skin aging, and is associated with sunburn, photodrug reactions, infections, weakening of the immune system, and damage to the eyes, including cataracts, photokeratitis (snow blindness) and eye cancer.
It can also occur due to using tanning beds without proper eyewear.

Sunless tanning

fake tanspray tanself-tanning
They may also contain dihydroxyacetone, a sunless tanner.
The popularity of sunless tanning has risen since the 1960s after health authorities confirmed links between UV exposure (from sunlight or tanning beds) and the incidence of skin cancer.

Indoor tanning lotion

tanning lotiontanning oilsuntan lotion
Before entering a tanning unit, the tanner usually applies indoor tanning lotion to the whole body and may use a separate facial-tanning lotion.
Unlike sunless tanning lotions, these are designed for use with an ultraviolet source such as a tanning bed or booth.

Sunlight

sunshinesolar radiationnatural light
Sunshine was promoted as a treatment for depression, diabetes, constipation, pneumonia, high and low blood pressure, and many other ailments.
For some, an alternative to sunbathing is the use of a sunbed that generates ultraviolet light and can be used indoors regardless of weather conditions.

Vitamin D

DCalciferol1,25 Dihydroxy vitamin D
While it causes skin cancer and other damage, including wrinkles, it also triggers the synthesis of vitamin D and endorphins in the skin.
These wavelengths are present in sunlight, as well as in the light emitted by the UV lamps in tanning beds (which produce ultraviolet primarily in the UVA spectrum, but typically produce 4% to 10% of the total UV emissions as UVB).

Basal-cell carcinoma

basal cell carcinomabasal cell cancerrodent ulcer
Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), whether from the sun or tanning devices is known to be a major cause of the three main types of skin cancer: non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma) and melanoma.
Tanning beds have become another common source of ultraviolet radiation.

Squamous cell skin cancer

Bowen's diseaseErythroplasia of Queyratsquamous cell carcinoma
For example, squamous cell carcinoma can be caused by a UVB-induced mutation in the p53 gene.
Tanning beds are becoming another common source of ultraviolet radiation.

List of IARC Group 1 carcinogens

Group 1 carcinogenGroup 1IARC Group 1 carcinogen
The WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer includes tanning devices, along with ultraviolet radiation from the sun, in its list of group 1 carcinogens.

Fluorescent lamp

fluorescent lightingfluorescent lightfluorescent
Most tanning beds are horizontal enclosures with a bench and canopy (lid) that house long, low-pressure fluorescent bulbs (100–200 watt) under an acrylic surface.
The lamps used in tanning beds contain a different phosphor blend (typically 3 to 5 or more phosphors) that emits both UVA and UVB, provoking a tanning response in most human skin.

Cholecalciferol

vitamin D 3 vitamin D3colecalciferol
Exposing arms and legs to a minimal 0.5 erythemal (mild sunburn) UVB dose is equal to consuming about 3000 IU of vitamin D3.
Cholecalciferol can be produced in skin from the light emitted by the UV lamps in tanning beds, which produce ultraviolet primarily in the UVA spectrum, but typically produce 4% to 10% of the total UV emissions as UVB.

Food and Drug Administration

FDAU.S. Food and Drug AdministrationUnited States Food and Drug Administration
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classifies tanning beds as "moderate risk" devices (changed in 2014 from "low risk").
Examples of CDRH-regulated devices include cellular phones, airport baggage screening equipment, television receivers, microwave ovens, tanning booths, and laser products.

Ultraviolet

UVultraviolet lightultraviolet radiation
Indoor tanning involves using a device that emits ultraviolet radiation to produce a cosmetic tan.

Western world

WesternWestthe West
First introduced in the 1920s, indoor tanning became popular with white people in the Western world, particularly in Scandinavia, in the late 1970s.

Scandinavia

Scandinavian countriesScandinavianNordic
First introduced in the 1920s, indoor tanning became popular with white people in the Western world, particularly in Scandinavia, in the late 1970s.

Skin whitening

skin bleachingskin lighteningskin-lightening
The practice finds a cultural parallel in skin whitening in Asian countries, and both support multibillion-dollar industries.

Northern Europe

NorthernNorthern EuropeanNorth Europe
Across Australia, Canada, Northern Europe and the United States, 18.2% of adults, 45.2% of university students, and 22% of adolescents had tanned indoors in the previous year, according to studies in 2007–2012.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, DCWashington D.C.District of Columbia
, thirteen U.S. states and one territory have banned under-18s from using them, and at least 42 states and the District of Columbia have imposed regulations, such as requiring parental consent.

Photoaging

skin agingaccelerated aging of the skinDermatoheliosis
Indoor tanning is a source of UV radiation, which is known to cause skin cancer, including melanoma and skin aging, and is associated with sunburn, photodrug reactions, infections, weakening of the immune system, and damage to the eyes, including cataracts, photokeratitis (snow blindness) and eye cancer.

Sunburn

sun burnburnSunburns
Indoor tanning is a source of UV radiation, which is known to cause skin cancer, including melanoma and skin aging, and is associated with sunburn, photodrug reactions, infections, weakening of the immune system, and damage to the eyes, including cataracts, photokeratitis (snow blindness) and eye cancer.

Phototoxicity

phototoxicdrug-induced light sensitivityphotodrug reactions
Indoor tanning is a source of UV radiation, which is known to cause skin cancer, including melanoma and skin aging, and is associated with sunburn, photodrug reactions, infections, weakening of the immune system, and damage to the eyes, including cataracts, photokeratitis (snow blindness) and eye cancer.

Infection

infectious diseaseinfectious diseasesinfections
Indoor tanning is a source of UV radiation, which is known to cause skin cancer, including melanoma and skin aging, and is associated with sunburn, photodrug reactions, infections, weakening of the immune system, and damage to the eyes, including cataracts, photokeratitis (snow blindness) and eye cancer.

Immune system

immuneimmune responseimmune function
Indoor tanning is a source of UV radiation, which is known to cause skin cancer, including melanoma and skin aging, and is associated with sunburn, photodrug reactions, infections, weakening of the immune system, and damage to the eyes, including cataracts, photokeratitis (snow blindness) and eye cancer.