Infantry

infantry regimentinfantrymanP.infantrymenfoot soldierfoot soldiersfootground troopsgruntfootmen
Infantry is a military specialization that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces.wikipedia
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Artillery

heavy artilleryordnanceartillery piece
Infantry is a military specialization that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces.
Artillery is a class of heavy military ranged weapons built to launch munitions far beyond the range and power of infantry's small arms.

Cavalry

cavalrymencavalrymanhorse
Infantry is a military specialization that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces. From the mid-18th century until 1881 the British Army named its infantry as numbered regiments "of Foot" to distinguish them from cavalry and dragoon regiments (see List of Regiments of Foot).
Infantry who moved on horseback, but dismounted to fight on foot, were known in the 17th and early 18th centuries as dragoons, a class of mounted infantry which later evolved into cavalry proper while retaining their historic title.

Military

armed forcesdefensedefence
Infantry make up a large portion of all armed forces in most nations, and typically bear the largest brunt in warfare, as measured by casualties, deprivation, or physical and psychological stress.
In addition to their rank, personnel occupy one of many trade roles, which are often grouped according to the nature of the role's military task on combat operations: combat roles (e.g. infantry), combat support roles (e.g. combat engineers), and combat service support roles (e.g. logistical support).

Tank

tankstank commanderarmor
Infantry is a military specialization that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces.
Modern tanks are more frequently organized into combined arms units which involve the support of infantry, who may accompany the tanks in infantry fighting vehicles, and supported by reconnaissance or ground-attack aircraft.

Combined arms

combined-armscombined arms tacticscombined
With armoured warfare, armoured fighting vehicles have replaced the horses of cavalry, and airpower has added a new dimension to ground combat, but infantry remains pivotal to all modern combined arms operations.
For example, an armored division—the modern paragon of combined arms doctrine—consists of a mixture of infantry, tank, artillery, reconnaissance, and perhaps even helicopter units, all coordinated and directed by a unified command structure.

Air assault

airmobilevertical envelopmentair mobility
Infantry are the most easily delivered forces to ground combat areas, by simple and reliable marching, or by trucks, sea or air transport; they can also be inserted directly into combat by amphibious landing, or for air assault by parachute (airborne infantry) or helicopter (airmobile infantry).
In addition to regular infantry training, air-assault units usually receive training in rappelling and air transportation, and their equipment is sometimes designed or field-modified to allow better transportation within aircraft.

Armoured fighting vehicle

armored fighting vehiclearmoured fighting vehiclesAFV
With armoured warfare, armoured fighting vehicles have replaced the horses of cavalry, and airpower has added a new dimension to ground combat, but infantry remains pivotal to all modern combined arms operations.
These heavy wagons were given protective sides with firing slits; their heavy firepower came from either a cannon or from a force of hand-gunners and crossbowmen, supported by infantry using pikes and flails.

Infantry fighting vehicle

IFVinfantry fighting vehiclesIFVs
They can be augmented with a variety of crew-served weapons, armoured personnel carriers, and infantry fighting vehicles.
An infantry fighting vehicle (IFV), also known as a mechanized infantry combat vehicle (MICV), is a type of armoured fighting vehicle used to carry infantry into battle and provide direct-fire support.

List of regiments of foot

Regiment of FootRegiments of Foot61st Regiment of Foot
From the mid-18th century until 1881 the British Army named its infantry as numbered regiments "of Foot" to distinguish them from cavalry and dragoon regiments (see List of Regiments of Foot).
Foot was the contemporary term for infantry.

Dragoon

dragoonscavalryIndependence Dragoons
From the mid-18th century until 1881 the British Army named its infantry as numbered regiments "of Foot" to distinguish them from cavalry and dragoon regiments (see List of Regiments of Foot). Dragoons were created as mounted infantry, with horses for travel between battles; they were still considered infantry since they dismounted before combat.
The establishment of dragoons evolved from the practice of sometimes transporting infantry by horse when speed of movement was needed.

Grenadier Guards

1st Foot Guards1st Regiment of Foot GuardsGrenadier
These names can persist long after the weapon speciality; examples of infantry units that retained such names are the Royal Irish Fusiliers and the Grenadier Guards.
The Grenadier Guards (GREN GDS) is an infantry regiment of the British Army.

Royal Irish Fusiliers

Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers)Royal Irish Fusiliers (Princess Victoria's)The Royal Irish Fusiliers
These names can persist long after the weapon speciality; examples of infantry units that retained such names are the Royal Irish Fusiliers and the Grenadier Guards.
The Royal Irish Fusiliers (Princess Victoria's) was an Irish line infantry regiment of the British Army, formed by the amalgamation of the 87th (Prince of Wales's Irish) Regiment of Foot and the 89th (Princess Victoria's) Regiment of Foot in 1881.

Mounted infantry

mounted riflesmountedmounted rifle
Dragoons were created as mounted infantry, with horses for travel between battles; they were still considered infantry since they dismounted before combat.
Mounted infantry were infantry who rode horses instead of marching.

Crew-served weapon

gunnerinfantry support weaponcrew served weapon
They can be augmented with a variety of crew-served weapons, armoured personnel carriers, and infantry fighting vehicles.
Crew-served weapons operated by infantry include sniper rifles, anti-materiel rifles, machine guns, automatic grenade launchers, mortars, anti-tank guns, anti-aircraft guns, recoilless rifles, shoulder-launched missile weapons, and static anti-tank and anti-aircraft missiles.

Division (military)

divisiondivisionsinfantry division
The terms "infantry", "armour", and "cavalry" used in the official names for military units like divisions, brigades, or regiments might be better understood as a description of their expected balance of defensive, offensive, and mobility roles, rather than just use of vehicles.
Infantry divisions during the World Wars ranged between 8,000 and 30,000 in nominal strength.

Motorized infantry

motorised infantrymotorisedmotorized
Similarly, motorised infantry have trucks and other unarmed vehicles for non-combat movement, but are still infantry since they leave their vehicles for any combat.
In NATO and most other western countries, motorized infantry is infantry that is transported by trucks or other motor vehicles.

Grenadier

grenadiersGranatieriGrenadier Company
Infantry equipped with special weapons were often named after that weapon, such as grenadiers for their grenades, or fusiliers for their fusils.
Grenade usage declined significantly in the early 18th century, a fact that can be attributed to the improved effectiveness of massive infantry line tactics and flintlock technology.

United States Army Rangers

RangerU.S. Army RangersArmy Ranger
More commonly in modern times, infantry with special tactics are named for their roles, such as commandos, rangers, snipers, marines, (who all have additional training) and militia (who have limited training); they are still infantry due to their expectation to fight as infantry when they enter combat.
These early American light infantry units, organized during the French and Indian War, bore the name "Rangers" and were the forerunners of the modern Army Rangers.

United States Army Basic Training

basic trainingAdvanced Individual TrainingBasic Combat Training
The basic training for all new US Army soldiers includes use of infantry weapons and tactics, even for tank crews, artillery crews, and base and logistical personnel.
A United States Army infantry recruit may expect a more intense, physically demanding basic training located at Fort Benning, Georgia through One Station Unit Training program.

Light infantry

lightLight RoleLight infantry (militia)
undefined 8th century BC to 15th century AD), infantry are categorised as either heavy infantry or light infantry.
Light infantry is a designation applied to certain types of foot soldiers (infantry) throughout history, typically having lighter equipment or armament or a more mobile or fluid function than other types of infantry, such as heavy infantry or line infantry.

Heavy infantry

armored infantryarmoured soldiersheavier infantry
undefined 8th century BC to 15th century AD), infantry are categorised as either heavy infantry or light infantry.
Heavy infantry refers to heavily armed and armoured infantrymen that were trained to mount frontal assaults and/or anchor the defensive center of a battle line.

Macedonian phalanx

phalangitesphalangitephalanx
Heavy infantry, such as Greek hoplites, Macedonian phalangites, and Roman legionaries, specialised in dense, solid formations driving into the main enemy lines, using weight of numbers to achieve a decisive victory, and were usually equipped with heavier weapons and armour to fit their role.
The Macedonian phalanx is an infantry formation developed by Philip II and used by his son Alexander the Great to conquer the Achaemenid Empire and other armies.

Soldier

soldiersservicemenmilitary personnel
In English, use of the term infantry began about the 1570s, describing soldiers who march and fight on foot.
As a result, "soldiers" are referred to by names or ranks which reflect an individual's military occupation specialty arm, service, or branch of military employment, their type of unit, or operational employment or technical use such as: trooper, tanker (a member of tank crew), commando, dragoon, infantryman, artilleryman, paratrooper, grenadier, ranger, sniper, engineer, sapper, craftsman, signaller, medic, or a gunner.

Landsknecht

landsknechtsLandsknechteGerman infantry
By the start of the Renaissance, the infantry began to return to dominance, with Swiss pikemen and German Landsknechts filling the role of heavy infantry again, using dense formations of pikes to drive off any cavalry.
Consisting predominantly of German mercenary pikemen and supporting foot soldiers, they were the universal mercenaries of early modern Europe, sometimes fighting on both sides of a conflict.

Brigade

Brigade CommanderbrigadesArmoured brigade
The terms "infantry", "armour", and "cavalry" used in the official names for military units like divisions, brigades, or regiments might be better understood as a description of their expected balance of defensive, offensive, and mobility roles, rather than just use of vehicles.
In the Australian Army, the brigade has always been the smallest tactical formation, since regiments are either administrative groupings of battalions (in the infantry) or battalion-sized units (in the cavalry).