Ingelfinger rule

In scientific publishing, the 1969 Ingelfinger rule originally stipulated that The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) would not publish findings that had been published elsewhere, in other media or in other journals.wikipedia
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Preprint

preprintspreprint serverpre-print
On the other hand, it has also been stated that the real reason for the Ingelfinger rule is to protect the journals' revenue stream, and with the increase in popularity of preprint servers such as arXiv, figshare, bioRxiv, and PeerJPrePrints many journals have loosened their requirements concerning the Ingelfinger rule.
Today, in some journals, posting preprints may disqualify the research from submission for publication due to the Ingelfinger Rule.

The New England Journal of Medicine

New England Journal of MedicineNEJMBoston Medical and Surgical Journal
In scientific publishing, the 1969 Ingelfinger rule originally stipulated that The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) would not publish findings that had been published elsewhere, in other media or in other journals.
Referred to as the Ingelfinger rule, this policy protects the originality of content.

Duplicate publication

multiple publicationmultiple submission
The Ingelfinger rule has been seen as having the aim of preventing authors from performing duplicate publications which would unduly inflate their publication record.
He coined the Ingelfinger rule term banning republications in the journal.

Franz J. Ingelfinger

Franz Ingelfinger
The rule is named for Franz J. Ingelfinger, the NEJM editor-in-chief who enunciated it in 1969.
The Ingelfinger rule is named after him.

BioRxiv

On the other hand, it has also been stated that the real reason for the Ingelfinger rule is to protect the journals' revenue stream, and with the increase in popularity of preprint servers such as arXiv, figshare, bioRxiv, and PeerJPrePrints many journals have loosened their requirements concerning the Ingelfinger rule.
As a result of bioRxiv's popularity, several biology journals have updated their policies on preprints, clarifying they do not consider preprints to be a 'prior publication' for purpose of the Ingelfinger rule.

Scientific journal

journalmathematics journalscientific journals
In scientific publishing, the 1969 Ingelfinger rule originally stipulated that The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) would not publish findings that had been published elsewhere, in other media or in other journals.

ArXiv

arXiv.orgArXiv.org e-print archivearXiv id
On the other hand, it has also been stated that the real reason for the Ingelfinger rule is to protect the journals' revenue stream, and with the increase in popularity of preprint servers such as arXiv, figshare, bioRxiv, and PeerJPrePrints many journals have loosened their requirements concerning the Ingelfinger rule.

Figshare

On the other hand, it has also been stated that the real reason for the Ingelfinger rule is to protect the journals' revenue stream, and with the increase in popularity of preprint servers such as arXiv, figshare, bioRxiv, and PeerJPrePrints many journals have loosened their requirements concerning the Ingelfinger rule.

PeerJ

PeerJ Computer SciencePeerJ PreprintsPeerJPrePrints
On the other hand, it has also been stated that the real reason for the Ingelfinger rule is to protect the journals' revenue stream, and with the increase in popularity of preprint servers such as arXiv, figshare, bioRxiv, and PeerJPrePrints many journals have loosened their requirements concerning the Ingelfinger rule.

Samuel Goudsmit

Samuel Abraham GoudsmitGoudsmitGoudsmtt, Samuel Abraham
An earlier version of the policy had been expressed in 1960 by Samuel Goudsmit, editor of the Physical Review Letters, but did not become as well known.

Physical Review Letters

Phys. Rev. Lett.PRL
An earlier version of the policy had been expressed in 1960 by Samuel Goudsmit, editor of the Physical Review Letters, but did not become as well known.

Network effect

network effectsnetwork externalitiesnetwork externality

Science communication

science communicatorscience communicatorscommunicator
However, when engaging in communication about science online, scientists should consider not publicizing or reporting findings from their research until it has been peer-reviewed and published, as journals may not accept the work after it has been circulated under the "Ingelfinger rule".

Nature Precedings

Scientists and journal publishers have expressed concerns regarding preprint submissions to Nature Precedings and whether these submissions would lead to violations of the Ingelfinger rule, a policy in which journals will not publish a manuscript if its findings have been reported elsewhere.