Ingenious Pain

Ingenious Pain is the first novel by English author, Andrew Miller, published in 1997.wikipedia
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International Dublin Literary Award

IMPAC Dublin Literary AwardDublin IMPAC AwardIMPAC
It won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction, the International Dublin Literary Award and the Italian Premio Grinzane Cavour prize for a foreign language novel.

Andrew Miller (novelist)

Andrew Miller
Ingenious Pain is the first novel by English author, Andrew Miller, published in 1997.
For his first book Ingenious Pain he received three awards, the James Tait Black Memorial Award for Fiction, the International Dublin Literary Award; and the Grinzane Cavour prize in Italy.

Grinzane Cavour Prize

Premio Grinzane CavourGrinzane Cavour literary prizeGrinzane-Cavour
It won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction, the International Dublin Literary Award and the Italian Premio Grinzane Cavour prize for a foreign language novel.

James Tait Black Memorial Prize

James Tait Black AwardJames Tait Black PrizeBest of the James Tait Black
It won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction, the International Dublin Literary Award and the Italian Premio Grinzane Cavour prize for a foreign language novel.

English people

EnglishEnglishmanEnglishmen
Ingenious Pain is the first novel by English author, Andrew Miller, published in 1997.

Freak show

circus freakscircus freakfreak shows
Set in the mid-18th century, the novel follows Dyer as he attempts to come to terms with this disability whilst working as a sideshow freak, then as a surgeon, until his eventual consignment to the Bethlem institute.

Bethlem Royal Hospital

BedlamBethlem HospitalBethlem
Set in the mid-18th century, the novel follows Dyer as he attempts to come to terms with this disability whilst working as a sideshow freak, then as a surgeon, until his eventual consignment to the Bethlem institute.

Publishers Weekly

Publisher's WeeklyPublisher’s WeeklyPublisher Weekly
Publishers Weekly called the novel "inventive", "steeped with specific details" and "beautifully controlled".

The Independent

The Independent on SundayIndependentIndependent on Sunday
In a review for The Independent, Josie Barnard praised the tone of the novel, stating "Ambivalence is one of Miller's strengths. He enfolds the reader in the present tense and wields his writing style as coolly and precisely as a scalpel."

Mores

social moresfolkwayscustoms
It was again reviewed by The Independent a year later by Lilian Pizzichini who opined that Millers "understanding of contemporary mores is thorough, the period detail precisely evoked, and his characters come alive with flashes of humour and compassion."

Patrick McGrath (novelist)

Patrick McGrathPat McGrathPatrick McGarth
Patrick Mcgrath writing for the New York Times was particularly effusive in his praise, calling the novel "peculiar", "colorful" and "complicated"; an "extraordinary first novel".

John Fowles

FowlesJohn Robert Fowles
He also praises the pacing of the novel; and draws comparison to John Fowles's novel The French Lieutenant's Woman; Graham Swift's Waterland; and Peter Ackroyd's "early flamboyant historical pastiches."

The French Lieutenant's Woman

bookeponymous 1969 novelscience and religion
He also praises the pacing of the novel; and draws comparison to John Fowles's novel The French Lieutenant's Woman; Graham Swift's Waterland; and Peter Ackroyd's "early flamboyant historical pastiches."

Graham Swift

He also praises the pacing of the novel; and draws comparison to John Fowles's novel The French Lieutenant's Woman; Graham Swift's Waterland; and Peter Ackroyd's "early flamboyant historical pastiches."

Waterland (novel)

Waterlandsame nameWaterland'' (novel)
He also praises the pacing of the novel; and draws comparison to John Fowles's novel The French Lieutenant's Woman; Graham Swift's Waterland; and Peter Ackroyd's "early flamboyant historical pastiches."

Peter Ackroyd

Ackroyd, PeterBritish authorMr Ackroyd
He also praises the pacing of the novel; and draws comparison to John Fowles's novel The French Lieutenant's Woman; Graham Swift's Waterland; and Peter Ackroyd's "early flamboyant historical pastiches."

Michael Thomas (author)

Michael Thomas
Thomas was the third author to win with a debut novel, following Andrew Miller's Ingenious Pain (1999) and Rawi Hage's De Niro's Game (2007).

One Morning Like a Bird

In conclusion she states "The obvious enjoyment with which Miller brought the 18th century to life for his books Casanova and Ingenious Pain is missing. The drama of the historical setting gets lost along the way, having promised a more compelling novel than ultimately emerges".