Inner Mongolia

Inner Mongolia Autonomous RegionNei MongolInnerInner MongolianNei MonggolSouthern MongoliaInner Mongolian Autonomous RegionInner-MongoliaNeimengguMongolian
Inner Mongolia or Nei Mongol (Mongolian: Mongolian script:, Öbür Monggol, Mongolian Cyrillic:, Övör Mongol, /ɵwɵr mɔŋɢɔɮ/; ), officially the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region or Nei Mongol Autonomous Region (NMAR), is a Mongolic autonomous region in Northern China.wikipedia
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Mongolian language

MongolianMongolKhalkha-Mongolian
Inner Mongolia or Nei Mongol (Mongolian: Mongolian script:, Öbür Monggol, Mongolian Cyrillic:, Övör Mongol, /ɵwɵr mɔŋɢɔɮ/; ), officially the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region or Nei Mongol Autonomous Region (NMAR), is a Mongolic autonomous region in Northern China. In Mongolian, the region was called Dotugadu monggol during Qing rule and was renamed into Öbür Monggol in 1947, öbür meaning the southern side of a mountain, while the Chinese term Nei Menggu was retained.
The number of speakers across all its dialects may be 5.2 million, including the vast majority of the residents of Mongolia and many of the Mongolian residents of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

Mongolian script

MongolianMongol scriptTraditional Mongolian alphabet
Inner Mongolia or Nei Mongol (Mongolian: Mongolian script:, Öbür Monggol, Mongolian Cyrillic:, Övör Mongol, /ɵwɵr mɔŋɢɔɮ/; ), officially the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region or Nei Mongol Autonomous Region (NMAR), is a Mongolic autonomous region in Northern China.
Alphabets based on this classical vertical script are used in Inner Mongolia and other parts of China to this day to write Mongolian, Xibe and experimentally, Evenki.

Mongolian Cyrillic alphabet

Mongolian CyrillicMongolianCyrillic
Inner Mongolia or Nei Mongol (Mongolian: Mongolian script:, Öbür Monggol, Mongolian Cyrillic:, Övör Mongol, /ɵwɵr mɔŋɢɔɮ/; ), officially the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region or Nei Mongol Autonomous Region (NMAR), is a Mongolic autonomous region in Northern China.
Cyrillic has not been adopted as the writing system in the Inner Mongolia region of China, which continues to use the traditional Mongolian script.

Gansu

Gansu ProvinceKansuGansu, China
The rest of the Sino–Mongolian border coincides with part of the international border of the Xinjiang autonomous region and the entirety of the international border of Gansu province and a small section of China's border with Russia (Zabaykalsky Krai). The Autonomous Region was established in 1947, incorporating the areas of the former Republic of China provinces of Suiyuan, Chahar, Rehe, Liaobei and Xing'an, along with the northern parts of Gansu and Ningxia.
The seventh-largest administrative district by area at 453700 km2, Gansu lies between the Tibetan and Loess plateaus and borders Mongolia (Govi-Altai Province), Inner Mongolia and Ningxia to the north, Xinjiang and Qinghai to the west, Sichuan to the south and Shaanxi to the east.

Hohhot

HuhhotHohhot, ChinaHohot
Its capital is Hohhot; other major cities include Baotou, Chifeng and Ordos.
Hohhot (Mongolian: Mongolian script: Kökeqota, Mongolian Cyrillic: Хөх хот Höh hot [[Help:IPA/Mongolian|]]; ), abbreviated Hushi, formerly known as Kweisui, is the capital of Inner Mongolia in the north of the People's Republic of China, serving as the region's administrative, economic and cultural center.

Autonomous regions of China

Autonomous regionRegionautonomous regions
Inner Mongolia or Nei Mongol (Mongolian: Mongolian script:, Öbür Monggol, Mongolian Cyrillic:, Övör Mongol, /ɵwɵr mɔŋɢɔɮ/; ), officially the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region or Nei Mongol Autonomous Region (NMAR), is a Mongolic autonomous region in Northern China.
The Inner Mongolia autonomous region was established in 1947; Xinjiang was made autonomous in 1955; Guangxi and Ningxia in 1958, and Tibet in 1965.

Baotou

Baotou, Inner MongoliaBaotou, NMBugat
Its capital is Hohhot; other major cities include Baotou, Chifeng and Ordos.
Baotou (Bugutu.svg Buɣutu qota) is the largest city by urban population in Inner Mongolia.

North China

Northern ChinaNorthnorthern
Inner Mongolia or Nei Mongol (Mongolian: Mongolian script:, Öbür Monggol, Mongolian Cyrillic:, Övör Mongol, /ɵwɵr mɔŋɢɔɮ/; ), officially the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region or Nei Mongol Autonomous Region (NMAR), is a Mongolic autonomous region in Northern China.
North China (literally "China's north") is a geographical region of China, consisting of the provinces of Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, Shanxi and Inner Mongolia.

Ningxia

Ningxia Hui Autonomous RegionNingxia Autonomous RegionNingxia Hui
The Autonomous Region was established in 1947, incorporating the areas of the former Republic of China provinces of Suiyuan, Chahar, Rehe, Liaobei and Xing'an, along with the northern parts of Gansu and Ningxia.
Ningxia is bounded by Shaanxi to the east, Gansu to the south and west, and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region to the north and has an area of around 66400 km2.

Mongols in China

MongolMongolsethnic Mongol
The majority of the population in the region are Han Chinese, with a sizeable titular Mongol minority. Before the rise of the Mongols in the 13th century, what is now central and western Inner Mongolia, especially the Hetao region, alternated in control between Chinese agriculturalists in the south, and Xiongnu, Xianbei, Khitan, Jurchen, Tujue, and nomadic Mongol of the north.
Most of them live in Inner Mongolia, Northeast China, Xinjiang, etc.

Mongolia under Qing rule

MongoliaQing ruleQing dynasty
In Mongolian, the region was called Dotugadu monggol during Qing rule and was renamed into Öbür Monggol in 1947, öbür meaning the southern side of a mountain, while the Chinese term Nei Menggu was retained.
Mongolia under Qing rule was the rule of the Qing dynasty of China over the Mongolian steppe, including the Outer Mongolian 4 aimags and Inner Mongolian 6 leagues from the 17th century to the end of the dynasty.

Xianbei

Xianbei languageXianbicolonised by Turkic people
Before the rise of the Mongols in the 13th century, what is now central and western Inner Mongolia, especially the Hetao region, alternated in control between Chinese agriculturalists in the south, and Xiongnu, Xianbei, Khitan, Jurchen, Tujue, and nomadic Mongol of the north.
The Xianbei were an ancient nomadic people that once resided in the eastern Eurasian steppes in what is today Mongolia, Inner Mongolia, and Northeastern China.

Dornogovi Province

DornogoviDornogovi aimagEast Gobi Province
Its border includes most of the length of China's border with Mongolia (Dornogovi, Sükhbaatar, Ömnögovi, Bayankhongor, Govi-Altai, Dornod Provinces).
It is located in the southeast of the country, bordering PR China's autonomous region of Inner Mongolia.

Xiongnu

Xiongnu EmpireSouthern XiongnuNorthern Xiongnu
Before the rise of the Mongols in the 13th century, what is now central and western Inner Mongolia, especially the Hetao region, alternated in control between Chinese agriculturalists in the south, and Xiongnu, Xianbei, Khitan, Jurchen, Tujue, and nomadic Mongol of the north.
The Xiongnu were also active in areas now part of Siberia, Inner Mongolia, Gansu and Xinjiang.

Provinces of China

ProvinceprovincesChinese provinces
Inner Mongolia is the country's 23rd most populous province-level division.
The Republic of China, established in 1912, set up four more provinces in Inner Mongolia and two provinces in historic Tibet, bringing the total to 28.

Zabaykalsky Krai

ZabaykalskyChitaTrans-Baikal Krai
The rest of the Sino–Mongolian border coincides with part of the international border of the Xinjiang autonomous region and the entirety of the international border of Gansu province and a small section of China's border with Russia (Zabaykalsky Krai).
The krai is located within the historical region of Transbaikalia and has extensive international borders with China (Inner Mongolia) (998 km) and Mongolia (Dornod Province, Khentii Province and Selenge Province) (868 km); its internal borders are with Irkutsk and Amur Oblasts, as well as with the Buryatia and the Sakha Republic.

List of Chinese administrative divisions by area

28th10th largest10th largest province in China
Its area makes it the third largest Chinese subdivision, constituting approximately 1,200,000 km2 and 12% of China's total land area.

Mongolia

MongolRepublic of MongoliaMongolian
Its border includes most of the length of China's border with Mongolia (Dornogovi, Sükhbaatar, Ömnögovi, Bayankhongor, Govi-Altai, Dornod Provinces).
It is sandwiched between Russia to the north and China to the south, where it neighbours the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

Donghu people

DonghuHuEastern Barbarians
During the Zhou dynasty, central and western Inner Mongolia (the Hetao region and surrounding areas) were inhabited by nomadic peoples such as the Loufan, Linhu, and Dí, while eastern Inner Mongolia was inhabited by the Donghu.
They lived in northern Hebei, southeastern Inner Mongolia and the western part of Liaoning, Jilin and Heilongjiang along the Yan Mountains and Greater Khingan Range.

Shanxi

Shanxi ProvinceShansiShangxi
During the Warring States period, King Wuling (340–295 BC) of the state of Zhao based in what is now Hebei and Shanxi provinces pursued an expansionist policy towards the region.
Shanxi borders Hebei to the east, Henan to the south, Shaanxi to the west, and Inner Mongolia to the north.

Hebei

Hebei ProvinceHopeiHopeh
During the Warring States period, King Wuling (340–295 BC) of the state of Zhao based in what is now Hebei and Shanxi provinces pursued an expansionist policy towards the region.
The province borders Liaoning to the northeast, Inner Mongolia to the north, Shanxi to the west, Henan to the south, and Shandong to the southeast.

Zhao (state)

ZhaoState of ZhaoZhao state
During the Warring States period, King Wuling (340–295 BC) of the state of Zhao based in what is now Hebei and Shanxi provinces pursued an expansionist policy towards the region.
Its territory included areas now in modern Inner Mongolia, Hebei, Shanxi and Shaanxi provinces.

Mongols

MongolMongolianMongolians
Inner Mongolia or Nei Mongol (Mongolian: Mongolian script:, Öbür Monggol, Mongolian Cyrillic:, Övör Mongol, /ɵwɵr mɔŋɢɔɮ/; ), officially the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region or Nei Mongol Autonomous Region (NMAR), is a Mongolic autonomous region in Northern China.
The Mongols (Монголчууд, Mongolchuud, ) are a Mongolic ethnic group native to Mongolia and to China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

Western Xia

Western Xia dynastyXi XiaXixia
They were followed by the Western Xia of the Tanguts, who took control of what is now the western part of Inner Mongolia (including western Hetao).
The Western Xia or Xi Xia, also known to the Mongols as the Tangut Empire and to the Tangut people themselves and to the Tibetans as Mi-nyak, was an empire which existed from 1038 to 1227 in what are now the northwestern Chinese provinces of Ningxia, Gansu, eastern Qinghai, northern Shaanxi, northeastern Xinjiang, southwest Inner Mongolia, and southernmost Outer Mongolia, measuring about 800,000 km2.

Shuofang Commandery

Shuofang
In that same year, he established the commanderies of Shuofang and Wuyuan in Hetao.
Shuofang was an ancient Chinese commandery, situated in the Hetao region in modern-day Inner Mongolia near Baotou.