A report on Inner Mongolia

Persian miniature depicting Genghis Khan entering Beijing
The Northern Yuan at its greatest extent
Mongolia plateau during early 17th century
Inner Mongolia and Outer Mongolia within the Qing dynasty, c. 1820
Mongols stand in front of a yurt, 1912
Delegates of Inner Mongolia People's Congress shouting slogans
Inner Mongolian steppes
Topography of Inner Mongolia in China
Winter in Ulanbutan Grassland, Hexigten Banner
Theater in Hohhot
Inner Mongolia Gymnasium
Muslim-themed Street in Hohhot
A KFC in Hohhot, the capital, with a bilingual street sign in Chinese and Mongolian
Inner Mongolian carpet c. 1870
Temple of the White Sulde of Genghis Khan in the town of Uxin in Inner Mongolia, in the Mu Us Desert. The worship of Genghis is shared by Chinese and Mongolian folk religion.
Sign of the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center
Jade dragon of the Hongshan culture (4700 BC – 2900 BC) found in Ongniud, Chifeng
Ulaanbutan grassland
Inner Mongolian grassland
Honorary tomb of Wang Zhaojun (born c. 50BC) in Hohhot
Fresco from the Liao dynasty (907–1125) tomb at Baoshan, Ar Horqin
Khitan people cooking. Fresco from the Liao dynasty (907–1125) tomb at Aohan
Remains of the city Khara-Khoto built in 1032. Located in Ejin Khoshuu, Alxa Aimag
Maidari Juu temple fortress ({{zh|labels=no |c=美岱召 |p=měidài zhào}}) built by Altan Khan in 1575 near Baotou
Newly built arch in front of the Maidari Juu temple fortress (1575)
Da Zhao temple (also called Ikh Zuu) built by Altan Khan in 1579
Badekar Monastery (1749) near Baotou, Inner Mongolia. Called Badgar Zuu in Mongolian
Five Pagoda temple (1727) in Hohhot
Badain Jaran temple (1868) in western Inner Mongolia
Genghis Khan Mausoleum (1954)
Genghis Khan Mausoleum (1954)
Alshaa mountain scenery
Alxa Western Monastery (Alshaa Baruun Hiid) built in 1756

Landlocked autonomous region of the People's Republic of China.

- Inner Mongolia

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Overall

Mongolian Plateau

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Part of the Central Asian Plateau lying between 37°46′-53°08′N and 87°40′-122°15′E and having an area of approximately 3200000 km2.

Part of the Central Asian Plateau lying between 37°46′-53°08′N and 87°40′-122°15′E and having an area of approximately 3200000 km2.

Inner Mongolia and parts of the Dzungarian basin in Xinjiang encompass the Chinese portion of the plateau.

Shaanxi

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Landlocked province of the People's Republic of China.

Landlocked province of the People's Republic of China.

Shaanxi People's Government
Shaanxi cuisine
Terracotta Army
Education Department of Shaanxi Province
Shaanxi Science and Technology Museum
Temple of the Chenghuangshen (City God) of Weinan.
Guangren Temple of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition in Xi'an.
Road to the stupa of the Famen Temple (Chinese Buddhist).
Temple of Xuanyuan in Huangling, Yan'an.

Officially part of Northwest China, it borders the province-level divisions of Shanxi (NE, E), Henan (E), Hubei (SE), Chongqing (S), Sichuan (SW), Gansu (W), Ningxia (NW) and Inner Mongolia (N).

Banners of Inner Mongolia

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A banner (, as "khoshun" in Mongolian) is an administrative division of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region in China, equivalent to a county-level administrative division.

1612 map by Isaac Massa showing Tingoesen landt (land of the Tungus, i.e. Evenks)

Tungusic peoples

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Ethno-linguistic group formed by the speakers of Tungusic languages .

Ethno-linguistic group formed by the speakers of Tungusic languages .

1612 map by Isaac Massa showing Tingoesen landt (land of the Tungus, i.e. Evenks)
Tunguska rivers, forming the western boundary
Distribution of the Tungusic languages
Portrait of a Tungusic man by Carl Peter Mazer (1850)
The Manchu people in Fuzhou in 1915
A Manchu guard
An Evenks wooden home
Sibo Sibe military colonists (1885)
An Udege family
Tungus man in Vorogovo, Siberia (1914)
A Manchu man in traditional clothing

The Oroqen, Solon, and Khamnigan inhabit some parts of Heilongjiang Province, Inner Mongolia, and Mongolia and may be considered as subgroups of the Evenk ethnicity, though the Solons and the Khamnigans in particular have interacted closely with Mongolic peoples (Mongol, Daur, Buryat), and they are ethnographically quite distinct from the Evenks in Russia.

Location of Western Xia in 1111 (green in north west)

Western Xia

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Tangut-led Buddhist imperial dynasty of China that existed from 1038 to 1227.

Tangut-led Buddhist imperial dynasty of China that existed from 1038 to 1227.

Location of Western Xia in 1111 (green in north west)
East Asia and Central Asia in AD 1142: the Southern Song dynasty in orange; the Jin dynasty in grey in the northeast; the Western Xia in turquoise and the Western Liao (Qara Khitai) in lime green in the northwest; and the Dali Kingdom in dark green in the southwest.
Location of Western Xia in 1111 (green in north west)
Mural of a Western Xia tomb guardian
Tangut officials
Western Xia caltrop
Bronze Xia seals bearing the Tangut seal script characters (ɣu sjwi) "commander"
Impression of the "commander" seal
Western Xia paiza with four Tangut characters reading "By imperial command, a pass to burn the horses" (i.e. to ride with great urgency)
Western Xia coin c. 1149-1169
Praying Tangut man
The Tangut Emperor and a boy, 13th century
Western Xia mail armour
Mace, Western Xia
Fragment of a stele with Tangut script
Tangut printing block
450 years after the destruction of the Tangut empire, the "Kingdom of Tenduc or Tangut" was still shown on some European maps as China's northwestern neighbor
A clay head of the Buddha, Western Xia dynasty, 12th century
A winged kalavinka made of grey pottery, Western Xia dynasty
A painting of the Buddhist manjusri, from the Yulin Caves of Gansu, China, from the Tangut-led Western Xia dynasty
Concubines of the Tangut ruler
Wooden figure of a Tangut soldier
Tangut women
Tangut bride
Printed text using pottery (argile) movable type from Western Xia around the mid-12th century. Found in Xinhua Xiang (新华乡); Wuwei City, Gansu province.
The Golden Light Sutra written in the Tangut script

At its peak, the dynasty ruled over the modern-day northwestern Chinese provinces of Ningxia, Gansu, eastern Qinghai, northern Shaanxi, northeastern Xinjiang, and southwest Inner Mongolia, and southernmost Outer Mongolia, measuring about 800,000 km2.

Map showing the Mongol autonomous subjects in the Greater China Area

Mongols in China

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Mongols in China or Mongolian Chinese are ethnic Mongols who were integrated into the nation-building of the Republic of China (1912–1949) after the fall of Qing Empire (1636–1911).

Mongols in China or Mongolian Chinese are ethnic Mongols who were integrated into the nation-building of the Republic of China (1912–1949) after the fall of Qing Empire (1636–1911).

Map showing the Mongol autonomous subjects in the Greater China Area
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Photo by Yvette Borup Andrews in 1920
An ethnic Mongol Chinese musician performing Inner Mongolian style morin khuur

Most of them live in Inner Mongolia, Northeast China, Xinjiang and Qinghai.

Ulanqab

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Ulanqab or Ulan Chab (Ulagancab.svgUlaɣančab qota; Mongolian cyrillic.Улаанцав хот) is a region administered as a prefecture-level city in south-central Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China.

Xilingol League

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Xilingol, Xilin Gol, Shiliin Gol or Xilinguole Aimag/League (Sili-yin gool ayimag.svg, Шилийн Гол аймаг, Shiliin Gol aimag, ) is one of 12 leagues of Inner Mongolia.

Zabaykalsky Krai

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Federal subject of Russia (a krai) that was created on March 1, 2008 as a result of a merger of Chita Oblast and Agin-Buryat Autonomous Okrug, after a referendum held on the issue on March 11, 2007.

Federal subject of Russia (a krai) that was created on March 1, 2008 as a result of a merger of Chita Oblast and Agin-Buryat Autonomous Okrug, after a referendum held on the issue on March 11, 2007.

Upper Middle River Sakukan, Kalarsky District.
The Chara Sands, a desert like area in the middle of Siberia, as seen near Novaya Chara. The Kodar Mountains lie in the background.

The krai is located within the historical region of Transbaikalia (Dauria) and has extensive international borders with China (Inner Mongolia and Heilongjiang) (998 km) and Mongolia (Dornod Province, Khentii Province and Selenge Province) (868 km); its internal borders are with Irkutsk and Amur Oblasts, as well as with the Buryatia and the Sakha Republic.

Flag Map of Mongolia with historical regions included

Pan-Mongolism

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Irredentist idea that advocates cultural and political solidarity of Mongols.

Irredentist idea that advocates cultural and political solidarity of Mongols.

Flag Map of Mongolia with historical regions included
Concentrations of ethnic Mongols (red) within the Mongol Empire (outlined in orange)
Regions commonly associated with Mongol irredentism.

The proposed territory, called "Greater Mongolia" (Даяар Монгол, Dayaar Mongol), Also known as (Хамаг Монгол):which means "Whole Mongolia" usually includes the independent state of Mongolia, the Chinese regions of Inner Mongolia and Dzungaria (in Xinjiang), and the Russian republic of Buryatia.