A report on Inner Mongolia

Persian miniature depicting Genghis Khan entering Beijing
The Northern Yuan at its greatest extent
Mongolia plateau during early 17th century
Inner Mongolia and Outer Mongolia within the Qing dynasty, c. 1820
Mongols stand in front of a yurt, 1912
Delegates of Inner Mongolia People's Congress shouting slogans
Inner Mongolian steppes
Topography of Inner Mongolia in China
Winter in Ulanbutan Grassland, Hexigten Banner
Theater in Hohhot
Inner Mongolia Gymnasium
Muslim-themed Street in Hohhot
A KFC in Hohhot, the capital, with a bilingual street sign in Chinese and Mongolian
Inner Mongolian carpet c. 1870
Temple of the White Sulde of Genghis Khan in the town of Uxin in Inner Mongolia, in the Mu Us Desert. The worship of Genghis is shared by Chinese and Mongolian folk religion.
Sign of the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center
Jade dragon of the Hongshan culture (4700 BC – 2900 BC) found in Ongniud, Chifeng
Ulaanbutan grassland
Inner Mongolian grassland
Honorary tomb of Wang Zhaojun (born c. 50BC) in Hohhot
Fresco from the Liao dynasty (907–1125) tomb at Baoshan, Ar Horqin
Khitan people cooking. Fresco from the Liao dynasty (907–1125) tomb at Aohan
Remains of the city Khara-Khoto built in 1032. Located in Ejin Khoshuu, Alxa Aimag
Maidari Juu temple fortress ({{zh|labels=no |c=美岱召 |p=měidài zhào}}) built by Altan Khan in 1575 near Baotou
Newly built arch in front of the Maidari Juu temple fortress (1575)
Da Zhao temple (also called Ikh Zuu) built by Altan Khan in 1579
Badekar Monastery (1749) near Baotou, Inner Mongolia. Called Badgar Zuu in Mongolian
Five Pagoda temple (1727) in Hohhot
Badain Jaran temple (1868) in western Inner Mongolia
Genghis Khan Mausoleum (1954)
Genghis Khan Mausoleum (1954)
Alshaa mountain scenery
Alxa Western Monastery (Alshaa Baruun Hiid) built in 1756

Landlocked autonomous region of the People's Republic of China.

- Inner Mongolia

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Location of the Chahars.

Chahars

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Location of the Chahars.
Yurts of the Nomadic Chahar People. Inner Mongolia, China, 1874

The Chahars (Khalkha Mongolian: Цахар, Tsahar; ) are a subgroup of Mongols that speak Chakhar Mongolian and predominantly live in southeastern Inner Mongolia, China.

Suiyuan as claimed by the Republic of China

Suiyuan

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Suiyuan is a de jure province of the Republic of China according to the ROC law, as the ROC government formally claims to be the legitimate government of China, with its capital located Guisui (now Hohhot).

Suiyuan is a de jure province of the Republic of China according to the ROC law, as the ROC government formally claims to be the legitimate government of China, with its capital located Guisui (now Hohhot).

Suiyuan as claimed by the Republic of China

The area Suiyuan covered is approximated today by the prefecture-level cities of Hohhot, Baotou, Wuhai, Ordos, Bayan Nur, and parts of Ulanqab, all today part of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.

Southern Mongolian

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Proposed major dialect group within the taxonomy of the Mongolian language.

Proposed major dialect group within the taxonomy of the Mongolian language.

It is assumed by most Inner Mongolia linguists and would be on the same level as the other three major dialect groups Khalkha, Buryat, Oirat.

Bayannur

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Bayannur or Bayannao'er (Bayannagur.svg Bayannaɣur qota, Mongolian Cyrillic Баяннуур хот) is a prefecture-level city in western Inner Mongolia, People's Republic of China.

Territory of the Former Qin kingdom and the Jin dynasty in 376.

Sixteen Kingdoms

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Chaotic period in Chinese history from AD 304 to 439 when the political order of northern China fractured into a series of short-lived dynastic states.

Chaotic period in Chinese history from AD 304 to 439 when the political order of northern China fractured into a series of short-lived dynastic states.

Territory of the Former Qin kingdom and the Jin dynasty in 376.
Ruins of Tongwancheng, the capital of the Xia kingdom built in the early 5th century by Xiongnu chieftain Helian Bobo in modern-day Jingbian, in northern Shaanxi province, near the border with Inner Mongolia. Tongwancheng was captured by the Xianbei-led Northern Wei in 427.
A mural painting showing a leisurely life scene 384-441 A.D., from the Dingjiazha Tomb No. 5 in Chiu-ch'üan, Later Liang – Northern Liang.
The White Horse Pagoda, Dunhuang, commemorating Kumarajiva's white horse which carried the scriptures to China, c. 384.
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In 315, Tuoba Yilu, a Xianbei chieftain, founded the Dai in modern-day Inner Mongolia.

Khalkha Mongols during the early Northern Yuan period.

Khalkha Mongols

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Largest subgroup of Mongol people in modern Mongolia since the 15th century.

Largest subgroup of Mongol people in modern Mongolia since the 15th century.

Khalkha Mongols during the early Northern Yuan period.
The Turco-Mongol residual states and domains by the 15th century
The Erdene Zuu Monastery was established in the 16th century by Abatai Sain Khan in the heartland of the Khalkha territory
"The Country of the Khalkha" (Pays des Kalkas) on a 1734 map by d'Anville, based on Jesuits' fieldwork ca. 1700
Tögs-Ochiryn Namnansüren of Khalkha, a leader of the National Liberation Movement of 1911
Former Queen Consort of Mongolia, Genepil

Dayan Khan created Khalkha Tumen out of Mongols residing in the territory of present-day central Mongolia and northern part of Inner Mongolia.

Slab grave. Exhibit in Ethnography Museum of E. Baikal peoples. Relocated from Horin region of Buryatia

Slab-grave culture

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Archaeological culture of the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age Mongols.

Archaeological culture of the Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age Mongols.

Slab grave. Exhibit in Ethnography Museum of E. Baikal peoples. Relocated from Horin region of Buryatia

Slab-grave cultural monuments are found in northern, central and eastern Mongolia, Inner Mongolia, Northwest China (Xinjiang region, Qilian Mountains etc.), Manchuria, Lesser Khingan, Buryatia, southern Irkutsk Oblast and southern and central Zabaykalsky Krai.

Territories within a Greater Mongolia.

Inner Mongolian independence movement

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Territories within a Greater Mongolia.
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The Inner Mongolian independence movement, also known as the Southern Mongolian independence movement , is a movement for the independence of Inner Mongolia (also known as Southern Mongolia ) and the political separation of Inner Mongolia from the People's Republic of China.

Greater Khingan

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The Greater Khingan Range or Da Hinggan Range (IPA: ), is a 1200 km-long volcanic mountain range in the Inner Mongolia region of Northeast China.

Yingchang

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One of the important cities in the Yuan dynasty.

One of the important cities in the Yuan dynasty.

It was situated on Lake Taal Nor in modern Heshigten Banner, Inner Mongolia, China.