Innovation

pioneerinnovativeinnovatorinnovationstrendsetterinnovatorsinnovatepioneerscreativitytechnological innovation
Innovation is a "new idea, creative thoughts, new imaginations in form of device or method".wikipedia
1,372 Related Articles

Engineering

engineerengineersengineered
Innovation often manifests itself via the engineering process, when the problem being solved is of a technical or scientific nature.
Engineering is the application of knowledge in the form of science, mathematics, and empirical evidence, to the innovation, design, construction, operation and maintenance of structures, machines, materials, devices, systems, processes, and organizations.

Invention

inventorinventionsinventors
Innovation is related to, but not the same as, invention, as innovation is more apt to involve the practical implementation of an invention (i.e. new/improved ability) to make a meaningful impact in the market or society, and not all innovations require an invention.
Another meaning of invention is cultural invention, which is an innovative set of useful social behaviours adopted by people and passed on to others.

Innovation economics

innovation economydevelopment of innovation technologieseconomic innovation
Economist Joseph Schumpeter (1883–1950), who contributed greatly to the study of innovation economics, argued that industries must incessantly revolutionize the economic structure from within, that is innovate with better or more effective processes and products, as well as market distribution, such as the connection from the craft shop to factory.
Innovation economics is a growing economic theory that emphasizes entrepreneurship and innovation.

Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley, CaliforniaSan JoseValley
A prime example of innovation involved the explosive boom of Silicon Valley startups out of the Stanford Industrial Park.
Silicon Valley is a region in the southern San Francisco Bay Area of Northern California that serves as a global center for high technology, innovation and social media.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Since then, hubs of innovation have sprung up globally with similar metonyms, including Silicon Alley encompassing New York City.
In the 21st century, New York has emerged as a global node of creativity and entrepreneurship, social tolerance, and environmental sustainability, and as a symbol of freedom and cultural diversity.

Disruptive innovation

disruptive technologydisruptive technologiesdisruption
According to Clayton Christensen, disruptive innovation is the key to future success in business.
In business, a disruptive innovation is an innovation that creates a new market and value network and eventually disrupts an existing market and value network, displacing established market-leading firms, products, and alliances.

Technological change

technological progresstechnologicaltechnological development
Foundational innovation tends to transform business operating models as entirely new business models emerge over many years, with gradual and steady adoption of the innovation leading to waves of technological and institutional change that gain momentum more slowly.
Technological change (TC), technological development, technological achievement, or technological progress is the overall process of invention, innovation and diffusion of technology or processes.

Silicon Alley

Since then, hubs of innovation have sprung up globally with similar metonyms, including Silicon Alley encompassing New York City.
High technology startup companies and employment are growing in New York City and across the metropolitan region, bolstered by the city's emergence as a global node of creativity and entrepreneurship, social tolerance, and environmental sustainability, as well as New York's position as the leading Internet hub and telecommunications center in North America, including its vicinity to several transatlantic fiber optic trunk lines, the city's intellectual capital, and its extensive outdoor wireless connectivity.

Exnovation

The opposite of innovation is exnovation.
In commerce and management, exnovation, an opposite of innovation, can occur when products and processes that have been tested and confirmed to be best-in-class are standardized to ensure that they are not innovated further.

Eric von Hippel

MIT economist Eric von Hippel has identified end-user innovation as, by far, the most important and critical in his classic book on the subject, The Sources of Innovation.
Eric von Hippel (born August 27, 1941) is an American economist and a professor at the MIT Sloan School of Management, specializing in the nature and economics of distributed and open innovation.

Linear model of innovation

linear model of technological innovation
In the simplest linear model of innovation the traditionally recognized source is manufacturer innovation.
Current models of innovation derive from approaches such as Actor-Network Theory, Social shaping of technology and social learning, provide a much richer picture of the way innovation works.

User innovation

Consumers or Usersend-user innovationuser-driven innovation
Regarding this user innovation, a great deal of innovation is done by those actually implementing and using technologies and products as part of their normal activities.
User innovation refers to innovation by intermediate users (e.g. user firms) or consumer users (individual end-users or user communities), rather than by suppliers (producers or manufacturers).

Chain-linked model

The Kline chain-linked model of innovation places emphasis on potential market needs as drivers of the innovation process, and describes the complex and often iterative feedback loops between marketing, design, manufacturing, and R&D.
The chain-linked model is an attempt to describe complexities in the innovation process.

Creative destruction

mutation
He famously asserted that "creative destruction is the essential fact about capitalism".
In fact, successful innovation is normally a source of temporary market power, eroding the profits and position of old firms, yet ultimately succumbing to the pressure of new inventions commercialised by competing entrants.

Entrepreneurship

entrepreneurFounderentrepreneurs
Entrepreneurs continuously look for better ways to satisfy their consumer base with improved quality, durability, service and price which come to fruition in innovation with advanced technologies and organizational strategies.
Innovation of new products, services or processes

Innovation management

innovationInnovation ManagerProcess Innovation
Nevertheless, Edison et al. in their review of literature on innovation management found 232 innovation metrics.
Innovation management is a combination of the management of innovation processes, and change management.

Economic growth

growthgrowth rategrowth theory
Another example involves business incubators – a phenomenon nurtured by governments around the world, close to knowledge clusters (mostly research-based) like universities or other Government Excellence Centres – which aim primarily to channel generated knowledge to applied innovation outcomes in order to stimulate regional or national economic growth.
Research done in this area has focused on what increases human capital (e.g. education) or technological change (e.g. innovation).

Diffusion of innovations

diffusion of innovationdiffusioninnovation diffusion
This process has been proposed that the life cycle of innovations can be described using the 's-curve' or diffusion curve.
Rogers argues that diffusion is the process by which an innovation is communicated over time among the participants in a social system.

Gabriel Tarde

TardeTarde, Gabriel
Diffusion of innovation research was first started in 1903 by seminal researcher Gabriel Tarde, who first plotted the S-shaped diffusion curve.
Gabriel Tarde (in full Jean-Gabriel De Tarde; 12 March 1843 – 13 May 1904) was a French sociologist, criminologist and social psychologist who conceived sociology as based on small psychological interactions among individuals (much as if it were chemistry), the fundamental forces being imitation and innovation.

Joseph Schumpeter

SchumpeterSchumpeterianneo-Schumpeterian
Economist Joseph Schumpeter (1883–1950), who contributed greatly to the study of innovation economics, argued that industries must incessantly revolutionize the economic structure from within, that is innovate with better or more effective processes and products, as well as market distribution, such as the connection from the craft shop to factory.
Today, Schumpeter has a following outside standard textbook economics, in areas such as economic policy, management studies, industrial policy, and the study of innovation.

Information Technology and Innovation Foundation

Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) Index
The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) Index
The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) is a U.S. nonprofit public policy think tank based out of Washington, D.C. The organization focuses on public policies that spur technology innovation.

Lisbon Strategy

LisbonLisbon SummitLisbon Declaration
The EU Lisbon Strategy has set as a goal that their average expenditure on R&D should be 3% of GDP.
Innovation as the motor for economic change (based on the writings of Joseph Schumpeter)

Singapore

🇸🇬Republic of SingaporeSingaporean
Singapore is a global hub for education, entertainment, finance, healthcare, human capital, innovation, logistics, manufacturing, technology, tourism, trade, and transport.

Startup company

startupstartupsstartup companies
Over the next 20 years, this snowball process launched the momentous startup-company explosion of information-technology firms.
Innovation

Community Innovation Survey

These standards are used for example in the European Community Innovation Surveys.
The harmonized surveys are designed to give information on the innovativeness of different sectors and regions.