Inorganic compound

inorganicinorganic compoundsinorganic chemicalinorganic chemicalsinorganicscompoundinorganic materialsinorganic saltsinorganic chemical compoundinorganic substances
An inorganic compound is typically a chemical compound that lacks carbon–hydrogen bonds, that is, a compound that is not an organic compound.wikipedia
1,131 Related Articles

Organic compound

syntheticorganicorganic compounds
An inorganic compound is typically a chemical compound that lacks carbon–hydrogen bonds, that is, a compound that is not an organic compound. In Wöhler era, there was widespread belief that organic compounds were characterized by a vital spirit.
For historical reasons discussed below, a few types of carbon-containing compounds, such as carbides, carbonates, simple oxides of carbon (for example, CO and CO 2 ), and cyanides are considered inorganic.

Cyanide

cyanocyanogenicCN
Examples include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonates, carbides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates.
In inorganic cyanides, the cyanide group is present as the anion CN −.

Life

livinglife on Earthbiota
Many of these are normal parts of mostly organic systems, including organisms, which means that describing a chemical as inorganic does not obligately mean that it does not occur within living things.
The classic 1952 Miller–Urey experiment and similar research demonstrated that most amino acids, the chemical constituents of the proteins used in all living organisms, can be synthesized from inorganic compounds under conditions intended to replicate those of the early Earth.

Ammonium cyanate

Friedrich Wöhler's conversion of ammonium cyanate into urea in 1828 is often cited as the starting point of modern organic chemistry.
Ammonium cyanate is an inorganic compound with the formula NH 4 OCN.

Organic chemistry

organicorganic chemistorganic chemical
Friedrich Wöhler's conversion of ammonium cyanate into urea in 1828 is often cited as the starting point of modern organic chemistry.
Before the nineteenth century, chemists generally believed that compounds obtained from living organisms were endowed with a vital force that distinguished them from inorganic compounds.

Inorganic Syntheses

Inorganic Syntheses is a book series which aims to publish "detailed and foolproof" procedures for the synthesis of inorganic compounds.

Inorganic compounds by element

calcium saltsLead compoundsarsenic compounds
This is a list of common inorganic and organometallic compounds of each element.

List of named inorganic compounds

Named inorganic compounds
Well-known inorganic and organometallic compounds and reagents that are named after individuals include:

Chemical compound

compoundcompoundschemical compounds
An inorganic compound is typically a chemical compound that lacks carbon–hydrogen bonds, that is, a compound that is not an organic compound.

Carbon–hydrogen bond

carbon-hydrogen moleculeC-H bondC–H bond
An inorganic compound is typically a chemical compound that lacks carbon–hydrogen bonds, that is, a compound that is not an organic compound.

Mantle (geology)

mantleEarth's mantlemantles
Inorganic compounds comprise most of the Earth's crust, although the compositions of the deep mantle remain active areas of investigation.

Carbon monoxide

COcarbon monoxide (CO)carbon monoxide poisoning
Examples include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonates, carbides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates.

Carbon dioxide

CO 2 CO2carbon dioxide (CO 2 )
Examples include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonates, carbides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates.

Carbonate

carbonatescarbonaceousCO 3
Examples include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonates, carbides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates.

Carbide

methanidecarbidespolycarbide
Examples include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonates, carbides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates.

Cyanate

NCO − cyanate anioncyanate ion
Examples include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonates, carbides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates.

Thiocyanate

thiocyanatesSCN − barium thiocyanate
Examples include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonates, carbides, cyanides, cyanates, and thiocyanates.

Organism

organismsflora and faunaliving organisms
Many of these are normal parts of mostly organic systems, including organisms, which means that describing a chemical as inorganic does not obligately mean that it does not occur within living things.

Wöhler synthesis

discoveryFriedrich WöhlerFriedrich Wöhler's synthesis of urea
Friedrich Wöhler's conversion of ammonium cyanate into urea in 1828 is often cited as the starting point of modern organic chemistry.

Urea

carbamideBosch–Meiser urea processCO(NH 2 ) 2
Friedrich Wöhler's conversion of ammonium cyanate into urea in 1828 is often cited as the starting point of modern organic chemistry.

Vitalism

vitalistvitalisticvital force
In Wöhler era, there was widespread belief that organic compounds were characterized by a vital spirit.