Inquest

coronial inquestcoroner's jurycoroner's inquestinquestscoroner's inquestscoronial inquiriescoronial inquiryinquest or inquiryjudicial inquest
An inquest is a judicial inquiry in common law jurisdictions, particularly one held to determine the cause of a person's death.wikipedia
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Coroner

Coroner's Courtcoroner's inquestmedical examiner
Conducted by a judge, jury, or government official, an inquest may or may not require an autopsy carried out by a coroner or medical examiner. An inquest may be called at the behest of a coroner, judge, prosecutor, or, in some jurisdictions, upon a formal request from the public.
A coroner is a government official who is empowered to conduct or order an inquest into the manner or cause of death, and to investigate or confirm the identity of an unknown person who has been found dead within the coroner's jurisdiction.

Jury

juriesjurorjurors
Conducted by a judge, jury, or government official, an inquest may or may not require an autopsy carried out by a coroner or medical examiner.
A third kind of jury, known as a coroner's jury can be convened in some common law jurisdiction in connection with an inquest by a coroner.

Medical examiner

Chief Medical ExaminerM.E.medical examiners
Conducted by a judge, jury, or government official, an inquest may or may not require an autopsy carried out by a coroner or medical examiner.
A medical examiner is an official trained in pathology that investigates deaths that occur under unusual or suspicious circumstances, to perform post-mortem examinations, and in some jurisdictions to initiate inquests.

Coroner's jury

juryinquest's jury
A coroner's jury may be convened to assist in this type of proceeding.
A coroner's jury is a body convened to assist a coroner in an inquest, that is, in determining the identity of a deceased person and the cause of death.

Inquests in England and Wales

inquestcoroner's inquestcoroner's treasure inquest
Larger inquests can be held into disasters, or in some jurisdictions (not England and Wales) into cases of corruption.
In England and Wales, inquests are the responsibility of a coroner, who operates under the jurisdiction of the Coroners and Justice Act 2009.

Grand jury

grand juriesfederal grand jurygrand juror
They acted somewhat like a grand jury, determining whether a person should be committed to trial in connection to a death.
To make this system of royal criminal justice more effective, Henry employed the method of inquest used by William the Conqueror in the Domesday Book.

Procurator fiscal

Procurators FiscalProcurator-Fiscalprocurator
There are no inquests or coroners in Scotland, where sudden unnatural deaths are reported to, and investigated on behalf of, the procurator fiscal for an area.
They investigate all sudden and suspicious deaths in Scotland (similar to a coroner in other legal systems), conduct fatal accident inquiries (a form of inquest unique to the Scottish legal system) and handle criminal complaints against the police (administrative complaints are handled by the Police Investigations and Review Commissioner).

Doc Holliday

John Henry "Doc" HollidayDoc" HollidayJohn H. "Doc" Holliday
A coroner's jury deemed Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, and their posse guilty in the death of Frank Stilwell in March 1882.
A coroner's inquest officially ruled his death a suicide; but according to the book I Married Wyatt Earp, which author and collector Glen Boyer claimed to have assembled from manuscripts written by Earp's third wife, Josephine Marcus Earp, Earp and Holliday traveled to Arizona with some friends in early July, found Ringo in the valley, and killed him.

Common law

common-lawcourts of common lawcommon
An inquest is a judicial inquiry in common law jurisdictions, particularly one held to determine the cause of a person's death.

Jurisdiction

jurisdictionsjurisdictionallegal jurisdiction
Larger inquests can be held into disasters, or in some jurisdictions (not England and Wales) into cases of corruption. An inquest is a judicial inquiry in common law jurisdictions, particularly one held to determine the cause of a person's death.

Cause of death

mortalitycauses of deathcause
An inquest is a judicial inquiry in common law jurisdictions, particularly one held to determine the cause of a person's death.

Judge

JusticeJJjustices
Conducted by a judge, jury, or government official, an inquest may or may not require an autopsy carried out by a coroner or medical examiner. An inquest may be called at the behest of a coroner, judge, prosecutor, or, in some jurisdictions, upon a formal request from the public.

Autopsy

post-mortemautopsiespost mortem
Conducted by a judge, jury, or government official, an inquest may or may not require an autopsy carried out by a coroner or medical examiner.

Prosecutor

prosecutionprosecuting attorneypublic prosecutor
An inquest may be called at the behest of a coroner, judge, prosecutor, or, in some jurisdictions, upon a formal request from the public.

Verdict

directed verdictspecial verdictverdicts
The verdict can be, for example, natural death, accidental death, misadventure, suicide, or murder.

Criminal law

criminalcriminal casepenal law
If the verdict is murder or culpable accident, criminal prosecution may follow, and suspects are able to defend themselves there.

Europe

EuropeanEUEuropean continent
Since juries are not used in most European civil law systems, these do not have any (jury) procedure similar to an inquest, but medical evidence and professional witnesses have been used in court in continental Europe for centuries.

Civil law (legal system)

civil lawcivilcivil law system
Since juries are not used in most European civil law systems, these do not have any (jury) procedure similar to an inquest, but medical evidence and professional witnesses have been used in court in continental Europe for centuries.

Disaster

disasterscatastrophecatastrophes
Larger inquests can be held into disasters, or in some jurisdictions (not England and Wales) into cases of corruption.

Political corruption

corruptioncorruptAnti-corruption
Larger inquests can be held into disasters, or in some jurisdictions (not England and Wales) into cases of corruption.

Scandinavia

Scandinavian countriesScandinavianNordic
The inquest, as a means of settling a matter of fact, developed in Scandinavia and the Carolingian Empire before the end of the tenth century.

Carolingian Empire

CarolingianCarolingian eraFrankish Empire
The inquest, as a means of settling a matter of fact, developed in Scandinavia and the Carolingian Empire before the end of the tenth century.

Domesday Book

Domesday SurveyDomesdayDoomsday Book
It was the method of gathering the survey data for the Domesday Book in England after the Norman conquest.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
It was the method of gathering the survey data for the Domesday Book in England after the Norman conquest.

Norman conquest of England

Norman ConquestConquestNorman invasion
It was the method of gathering the survey data for the Domesday Book in England after the Norman conquest.