Intercurrent disease in pregnancy

intercurrent diseasesintercurrent diseases in pregnancyConcomitant disease in pregnancyconcomitant disease,pre-existing condition in pregnancywho become pregnant
An intercurrent (ie concurrent, concomitant or, in most cases, pre-existing) disease in pregnancy is a disease that is not directly caused by the pregnancy (in contrast to a complication of pregnancy), but which may become worse or be a potential risk to the pregnancy (such as causing pregnancy complications).wikipedia
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Diabetes and pregnancy

Diabetes mellitus and pregnancydiabetes in pregnancydiabetes
Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy deals with the interactions of diabetes mellitus (not restricted to gestational diabetes) and pregnancy.
If the woman has diabetes as an intercurrent disease in pregnancy, it can cause early labor, birth defects, and larger than average infants.

Thyroid disease in pregnancy

Thyroid in pregnancyWomen are affected by hypothyroidism
Thyroid disease in pregnancy can, if uncorrected, cause adverse effects on fetal and maternal well-being.
Thyroid disorders are prevalent in women of child-bearing age and for this reason commonly present as an intercurrent disease in pregnancy and the puerperium.

Vertically transmitted infection

vertical transmissionmother-to-child transmissionvertically
It can occur when the mother gets an infection as an intercurrent disease in pregnancy.

Hypercoagulability in pregnancy

Pregnancy-induced hypercoagulabilityblood clotting in pregnancyduring pregnancy
Hypercoagulability in pregnancy is the propensity of pregnant women to develop thrombosis (blood clots).
Hypercoagulability states as a pre-existing condition in pregnancy include both acquired ones, such as antiphospholipid antibodies, and congenital ones, including factor V Leiden, prothrombin mutation, proteins C and S deficiencies, and antithrombin III deficiency.

Infection

infectious diseaseinfectious diseasesinfections

Pregnancy

pregnantfirst trimesterpregnant women
An intercurrent (ie concurrent, concomitant or, in most cases, pre-existing) disease in pregnancy is a disease that is not directly caused by the pregnancy (in contrast to a complication of pregnancy), but which may become worse or be a potential risk to the pregnancy (such as causing pregnancy complications).
Medical imaging may be indicated in pregnancy because of pregnancy complications, intercurrent diseases or routine prenatal care.

Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy

LupusSLE in pregnancySystemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in pregnancy
Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy confers an increased rate of fetal death in utero and spontaneous abortion (miscarriage), as well as of neonatal lupus.
While most infants born to mothers who have SLE are healthy, mothers with SLE as an intercurrent disease in pregnancy should remain under medical care until delivery.

Bacterial vaginosis

vaginosisbacterial vaginitisNon-specific vaginitis
Bacterial vaginosis is an imbalance of naturally occurring bacterial flora in the vagina.
In addition, bacterial vaginosis as an intercurrent disease in pregnancy may increase the risk of pregnancy complications, most notably premature birth or miscarriage.

Coeliac disease

celiac diseaseceliac spruecoeliac
Untreated celiac disease can cause spontaneous abortion (miscarriage), intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low birthweight and preterm birth.

Valvular heart disease

heart valve diseaseCardiac Valve Diseasevalve disease
In case of valvular heart disease in pregnancy, the maternal physiological changes in pregnancy confer additional load on the heart and may lead to complications.
Issues that have to be addressed include the risks during pregnancy to the mother and the developing fetus by the presence of maternal valvular heart disease as an intercurrent disease in pregnancy.

Multiple sclerosis

MSmultiple sclerosis (MS)disseminated sclerosis
Being pregnant decreases the risk of relapse in multiple sclerosis; however, during the first months after delivery the risk increases.
Women with MS who become pregnant experience fewer relapses; however, during the first months after delivery the risk increases.

Birth weight

birthweightlow birthweightlow birth weight
Untreated celiac disease can cause spontaneous abortion (miscarriage), intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low birthweight and preterm birth.
Intercurrent diseases in pregnancy are sometimes associated with decreased birth weight.

Miscarriage

miscarriedspontaneous abortionmiscarriages
Systemic lupus erythematosus and pregnancy confers an increased rate of fetal death in utero and spontaneous abortion (miscarriage), as well as of neonatal lupus. Untreated celiac disease can cause spontaneous abortion (miscarriage), intrauterine growth restriction, small for gestational age, low birthweight and preterm birth. Bacterial vaginosis as an intercurrent disease in pregnancy may increase the risk of pregnancy complications, most notably premature birth or miscarriage. Multiple sclerosis does not increase the risk of congenital abnormality or miscarriage.
Several intercurrent diseases in pregnancy can potentially increase the risk of miscarriage, including diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), hypothyroidism, certain infectious diseases, and autoimmune diseases.

Complications of pregnancy

pregnancy complicationsobstetrical complicationscomplications
An intercurrent (ie concurrent, concomitant or, in most cases, pre-existing) disease in pregnancy is a disease that is not directly caused by the pregnancy (in contrast to a complication of pregnancy), but which may become worse or be a potential risk to the pregnancy (such as causing pregnancy complications). Bacterial vaginosis as an intercurrent disease in pregnancy may increase the risk of pregnancy complications, most notably premature birth or miscarriage.

Birth defect

congenitalcongenital disorderbirth defects
Multiple sclerosis does not increase the risk of congenital abnormality or miscarriage.
It can occur when the mother gets an infection as an intercurrent disease in pregnancy.

Behçet's disease

Behcet's diseaseBehcet syndromeBehcet's syndrome
Pregnancy does not have an adverse effect on the course of Behçet's disease and may possibly ameliorate its course.
With Behçet's disease as an intercurrent disease in pregnancy, the pregnancy does not have an adverse effect on the course of Behçet's disease and may possibly ameliorate its course.

Drugs in pregnancy

Drugsfetal drug exposurehuman teratogen
A major component of this risk can result from necessary use of drugs in pregnancy to manage the disease.

Maternal–fetal medicine

maternal-fetal medicineperinatologyperinatal medicine
Such a team might include (besides an obstetrician) a specialist in the disorder and other practitioners (for example, maternal-fetal specialists or obstetric physicians, dieticians, etc.).

Obstetric medicine

maternal medicineobstetric physicians
Such a team might include (besides an obstetrician) a specialist in the disorder and other practitioners (for example, maternal-fetal specialists or obstetric physicians, dieticians, etc.).

Dietitian

dieteticsdieticiandietitians
Such a team might include (besides an obstetrician) a specialist in the disorder and other practitioners (for example, maternal-fetal specialists or obstetric physicians, dieticians, etc.).

Diabetes

diabetes mellitusdiabeticdiabetics
Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy deals with the interactions of diabetes mellitus (not restricted to gestational diabetes) and pregnancy.

Gestational diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitusdiabetesdiabetes in pregnancy
Diabetes mellitus and pregnancy deals with the interactions of diabetes mellitus (not restricted to gestational diabetes) and pregnancy.

Thrombosis

blood clotsthromboticblood clot
Hypercoagulability in pregnancy is the propensity of pregnant women to develop thrombosis (blood clots).

Thrombophilia

hypercoagulabilityhypercoagulable statehypercoagulable
Pregnancy itself is a factor of hypercoagulability (pregnancy-induced hypercoagulability), as a physiologically adaptive mechanism to prevent post partum bleeding.

Postpartum bleeding

postpartum hemorrhagepostpartum haemorrhagepost-partum haemorrhage
Pregnancy itself is a factor of hypercoagulability (pregnancy-induced hypercoagulability), as a physiologically adaptive mechanism to prevent post partum bleeding.