Plan of the upper portions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.
Carotid arteries.
H&E stained fibers of the vagus nerve (bottom right) innervate the sinoatrial node tissue (middle left)
Internal carotid artery
Inferior view of the human brain, with the cranial nerves labeled.
Segments of the internal carotid artery, delineated on an MRA of the head.
Section of the neck at about the level of the sixth cervical vertebra
Level of 6th cervical vertebrae - still at level of common carotid but relationships are similar to those of cervical segment of internal carotid
Transverse section of thorax, showing relations of pulmonary artery
Internal carotid artery - dissection
The arch of the aorta, and its branches
Oblique section through the cavernous sinus.
Dura mater and its processes exposed by removing part of the right half of the skull, and the brain
The ophthalmic artery and its branches
The tracheobronchial lymph glands
Circle of Willis
Section of the medulla oblongata at about the middle of the olive
Diagram of the arterial circulation at the base of the brain (inferior view).
Hind- and mid-brains; postero-lateral view
Upper part of medulla spinalis and hind- and mid-brains; posterior aspect, exposed in situ
The right sympathetic chain and its connections with the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic plexuses
The celiac ganglia with the sympathetic plexuses of the abdominal viscera radiating from the ganglia
The position and relation of the esophagus in the cervical region and in the posterior mediastinum, seen from behind
The thyroid gland and its relations
The thymus of a full-term fetus, exposed in situ
Deep dissection of vagus nerve
Vagus nerve – dissection

Upon leaving the medulla oblongata between the olive and the inferior cerebellar peduncle, the vagus nerve extends through the jugular foramen, then passes into the carotid sheath between the internal carotid artery and the internal jugular vein down to the neck, chest, and abdomen, where it contributes to the innervation of the viscera, reaching all the way to the colon.

- Vagus nerve

Higher up, it is separated from the external carotid by the styloglossus and stylopharyngeus muscles, the tip of the styloid process and the stylohyoid ligament, the glossopharyngeal nerve and the pharyngeal branch of the vagus nerve.

- Internal carotid artery
Plan of the upper portions of the glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves.

5 related topics with Alpha

Overall

The fascia and middle thyroid veins. (Internal jugular visible at center left.)

Internal jugular vein

3 links

Paired jugular vein that collects blood from the brain and the superficial parts of the face and neck.

Paired jugular vein that collects blood from the brain and the superficial parts of the face and neck.

The fascia and middle thyroid veins. (Internal jugular visible at center left.)
Diagram showing completion of development of the parietal veins.
The venæ cavæ and azygos veins, with their tributaries.
The thyroid gland and its relations.

This vein runs in the carotid sheath with the common carotid artery and vagus nerve.

It runs down the side of the neck in a vertical direction, being at one end lateral to the internal carotid artery, and then lateral to the common carotid artery, and at the root of the neck, it unites with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein (innominate vein); a little above its termination is a second dilation, the inferior bulb.

The common carotid artery arises directly from the aorta on the left and as a branch of the brachiocephalic trunk on the right.

Common carotid artery

2 links

The common carotid artery arises directly from the aorta on the left and as a branch of the brachiocephalic trunk on the right.
Arteries of the neck. The right common carotid artery – labeled Common caroti in the figure – divides into the right internal carotid artery and external carotid artery.
Superficial dissection of the right side of the neck, showing the carotid and subclavian arteries
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Normal carotidal arteriography
Common carotid artery
Common carotid artery – right view
Brachial plexus and common carotid artery
Common carotid artery
Common carotid artery
Right and left common carotid arteries

In anatomy, the left and right common carotid arteries (carotids) are arteries that supply the head and neck with oxygenated blood; they divide in the neck to form the external and internal carotid arteries.

To its right side below is the brachiocephalic trunk, and above, the trachea, the inferior thyroid veins, and the remains of the thymus; to its left side are the left vagus and phrenic nerves, left pleura, and lung.

Section of the neck at about the level of the sixth cervical vertebra. Showing the arrangement of the fascia coli. Carotid sheath is labeled in red.

Carotid sheath

2 links

Anatomical term for the fibrous connective tissue that surrounds the vascular compartment of the neck.

Anatomical term for the fibrous connective tissue that surrounds the vascular compartment of the neck.

Section of the neck at about the level of the sixth cervical vertebra. Showing the arrangement of the fascia coli. Carotid sheath is labeled in red.
Hypoglossal nerve, cervical plexus, and their branches.
Muscles of the pharynx, viewed from behind, together with the associated vessels and nerves.

parts of the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.

the vagus nerve.

Human neck

Neck

1 links

Part of the body on many vertebrates that connects the head with the torso.

Part of the body on many vertebrates that connects the head with the torso.

Human neck
Muscles in the human neck
Clear view of Adam's apple in profile.
Development of neck lines (lat.monillas) or "moon rings" due to excess fat.
The long neck is a distinguishing feature of the giraffe.

Vascular compartment is paired and consists of the two carotid sheaths found on each side of the trachea. Each carotid sheath contains the vagus nerve, common carotid artery and internal jugular vein.

Arteries which supply the neck are common carotid arteries which bifurcate into the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.

Plan of upper portions of glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves. ("Laryngeal" labeled at lower right.)

Superior laryngeal nerve

0 links

Plan of upper portions of glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves. ("Laryngeal" labeled at lower right.)
The position and relation of the esophagus in the cervical region and in the posterior mediastinum. Seen from behind.

The superior laryngeal nerve is a branch of the vagus nerve.

The superior laryngeal nerve descends, by the side of the pharynx, behind the internal carotid artery, and divides into two branches —the external laryngeal nerve and the internal laryngeal nerve.