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Specialty (medicine)

medical specialtyspecialtyspecialist
Internal medicine or general medicine (in Commonwealth nations) is the medical specialty dealing with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of adult diseases.

General practitioner

GPgeneral practitionersgeneral practice
Although internists may act as primary care physicians, they are not "family physicians," "family practitioners," or "general practitioners," whose training is not solely concentrated on adults and may include surgery, obstetrics, and pediatrics.
In these countries the word "physician" is largely reserved for certain other types of medical specialists, notably in internal medicine.

Medical school

medical studentFaculty of Medicinemedical students
Medical education programs are tertiary-level courses, undertaken at a medical school attached to a university.
Subsequent clinical rotations usually include internal medicine, general surgery, pediatrics, psychiatry, and obstetrics and gynecology, among others.

American College of Physicians

FACPFellow of the American College of PhysiciansAmerican Society of Internal Medicine
The American College of Physicians defines internists as "physicians who specialize in the prevention, detection and treatment of illnesses in adults".
The American College of Physicians (ACP) is a national organization of internists, who specialize in the diagnosis, treatment, and care of adults.

American Board of Internal Medicine

American Board of Internal Medicine FoundationAmerican Board of Internal Medicine FoundationAmerican Boards of Internal Medicine
In the United States, three organizations are responsible for certification of trained internists (i.e., doctors who have completed an accredited residency training program) in terms of their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are essential for excellent patient care: the American Board of Internal Medicine, the American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine and the Board of Certification in Internal Medicine.
The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, self-appointed physician-evaluation organization that certifies physicians practicing internal medicine and its subspecialties.

American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine

Internal Medicine
In the United States, three organizations are responsible for certification of trained internists (i.e., doctors who have completed an accredited residency training program) in terms of their knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are essential for excellent patient care: the American Board of Internal Medicine, the American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine and the Board of Certification in Internal Medicine.
The American Osteopathic Board of Internal Medicine (AOBIM) is an organization that provides board certification to qualified Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) who specialize in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease in adults (internists).

Primary care physician

primary care physiciansprimary careprimary care providers
Although internists may act as primary care physicians, they are not "family physicians," "family practitioners," or "general practitioners," whose training is not solely concentrated on adults and may include surgery, obstetrics, and pediatrics.
To become primary care physicians, medical school graduates then undertake postgraduate training in primary care programs, such as family medicine (also called family practice or general practice in some countries), pediatrics or internal medicine.

Cardiology

cardiologistcardiologistscardiovascular medicine
Physicians who specialize in this field of medicine are called cardiologists, a specialty of internal medicine.

Internship (medicine)

internshipinternmedical intern
Internists are qualified physicians with postgraduate training in internal medicine and should not be confused with "interns", who are doctors in their first year of residency training (officially the term intern is no longer in use).
The first year is divided into three months in specialties: internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, surgery, and pediatrics.

Residency (medicine)

residencyresidentresidents
In North America, this period of postgraduate training is referred to as residency training, followed by an optional fellowship if the internist decides to train in a subspecialty.
The internship is regulated by the National Board of Health and Welfare and regardless of place of employment it is made up of four main postings with a minimum of nine months divided between internal medicine and surgery—with no less than three months in each posting—three months in psychiatry, and six months in general practice.

Veterinary medicine

veterinaryveterinary scienceanimal health
Internal medicine is also a specialty within clinical pharmacy and veterinary medicine.
These vets may be involved in a general practice, treating animals of all types; may be specialized in a specific group of animals such as companion animals, livestock, laboratory animals, zoo animals or horses; or may specialize in a narrow medical discipline such as surgery, dermatology, laboratory animal medicine, or internal medicine.

Endocrine system

endocrineendocrinologicalendocrine organ
Endocrinology is a branch of internal medicine.

Hospital medicine

hospitalisthospitalistshospitalist medicine
Pressures on time have led to many internal medicine physicians to choose one practice setting, who may choose to practice only in the hospital, as a "hospitalist", or only in an outpatient clinic, as a primary care physician.
Hospital medicine is a medical specialty that exists in some countries as a branch of internal medicine, dealing with the care of acutely ill hospitalized patients.

Family medicine

family physicianfamily practicefamily doctor
Although internists may act as primary care physicians, they are not "family physicians," "family practitioners," or "general practitioners," whose training is not solely concentrated on adults and may include surgery, obstetrics, and pediatrics.
Their residency training includes rotations in internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, psychiatry, surgery, emergency medicine, and geriatrics.

Clinical cardiac electrophysiology

Electrophysiological interventionselectrophysiology
The training required to become an electrophysiologist is lengthy and requires seven to eight years after medical school (in the U.S.), entailing three years of internal medicine residency, three years of clinical cardiology fellowship, and one to two (in most instances) years of clinical cardiac electrophysiology.

Adolescent medicine

EphebiatricshebiatricsAdolescent and Young Adult Medicine
Adolescent medicine providers are generally drawn from the specialties of pediatrics, internal medicine, med/peds or family medicine.

Rheumatology

rheumatologistrheumaticrheumatologic
Rheumatologists are internists who are qualified by additional postgraduate training and experience in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis and other diseases of the joints, muscles and bones.

Infectious disease (medical specialty)

Infectious diseaseinfectious diseasesinfectiology
In the United States, infectious diseases is a subspecialty of internal medicine and pediatrics i.e., an internist does at least an additional two years of a fellowship and a pediatrician does at least three years to qualify as an infectious diseases specialist and take the infectious diseases board certification exam of the American Board of Internal Medicine or the American Board of Pediatrics.

Acute medicine

acuteacuityacute care
Acute medicine is that part of internal medicine concerned with the immediate and early specialist management of adult patients with a wide range of medical conditions who present in hospital as emergencies.

Endocrinology

endocrinologistendocrinologistsendocrinopathy
Endocrinologists are specialists of internal medicine or pediatrics.

American College of Osteopathic Internists

The American College of Osteopathic Internists recognizes the following subspecialties:
The American College of Osteopathic Internists (ACOI) is a medical association in the United States representing osteopathic physicians that specialize in internal medicine.

Pulmonology

pulmonologistRespirologyrespiratory medicine
Pulmonology is considered a branch of internal medicine, and is related to intensive care medicine.

Geriatrics

geriatricgeriatric medicinegeriatrician
or M.D.) who are board-certified in either family medicine or internal medicine and who have also acquired the additional training necessary to obtain the Certificate of Added Qualifications (CAQ) in geriatric medicine.

Medical genetics

clinical geneticsmedical geneticistgenomic medicine
Individuals seeking acceptance into clinical genetics training programs must hold an M.D. or D.O. degree (or their equivalent) and have completed a minimum of 24 months of training in an ACGME-accredited residency program in internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, or other medical specialty.

Kidney

kidneysrenalkidney disorder
Nephrology is the subspeciality under Internal Medicine that deals with kidney function and disease states related to renal malfunction and their management including dialysis and kidney transplantation.