International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

ICESCRInternational Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural RightsEconomic, Social and Cultural RightsInternational Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights1966 International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural RightsArticle 15Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural RightsCovenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rightseconomic, and cultural rightseconomic, social, and cultural rights
The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) is a multilateral treaty adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 16 December 1966 through GA.wikipedia
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Right to education

educationeducation a fundamental righteducation rights
It commits its parties to work toward the granting of economic, social, and cultural rights (ESCR) to the Non-Self-Governing and Trust Territories and individuals, including labour rights and the right to health, the right to education, and the right to an adequate standard of living.
The right to education has been recognized as a human right in a number of international conventions, including the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights which recognizes a right to free, compulsory primary education for all, an obligation to develop secondary education accessible to all, on particular by the progressive introduction of free secondary education, as well as an obligation to develop equitable access to higher education, ideally by the progressive introduction of free higher education.

United Nations list of Non-Self-Governing Territories

non-self-governing territoryNon-Self-Governing Territorieslist of non-self-governing territories
It commits its parties to work toward the granting of economic, social, and cultural rights (ESCR) to the Non-Self-Governing and Trust Territories and individuals, including labour rights and the right to health, the right to education, and the right to an adequate standard of living.

International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights

ICCPRInternational Covenant of Civil and Political RightsInternational Convention on Civil and Political Rights
The ICESCR (and its [[Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights|Optional Protocol]]) is part of the International Bill of Human Rights, along with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), including the latter's [[First Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights|first]] and [[Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights|second]] Optional Protocols.
The ICCPR is part of the International Bill of Human Rights, along with the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR).

Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

ICESCROptional Protocol
The ICESCR (and its [[Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights|Optional Protocol]]) is part of the International Bill of Human Rights, along with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), including the latter's [[First Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights|first]] and [[Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights|second]] Optional Protocols.
]]The Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights is an international treaty establishing complaint and inquiry mechanisms for the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural RightsUnited Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural RightsCESCR
The Covenant is monitored by the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.
The Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR) is a United Nations body of 18 experts that usually meets twice per year in Geneva to consider the five-yearly reports submitted by UN member states on their compliance with the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR).

Right to health

healthhealthcareright to protection of health
It commits its parties to work toward the granting of economic, social, and cultural rights (ESCR) to the Non-Self-Governing and Trust Territories and individuals, including labour rights and the right to health, the right to education, and the right to an adequate standard of living.
The concept of a right to health has been enumerated in international agreements which include the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Economic, social and cultural rights

social rightseconomic rightseconomic, social, and cultural rights
It commits its parties to work toward the granting of economic, social, and cultural rights (ESCR) to the Non-Self-Governing and Trust Territories and individuals, including labour rights and the right to health, the right to education, and the right to an adequate standard of living.
The Universal Declaration on Human Rights recognises a number of economic, social and cultural rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) is the primary international legal source of economic, social and cultural rights.

Right to an adequate standard of living

freedom from wantadequate standard of livingright to a standard of living
It commits its parties to work toward the granting of economic, social, and cultural rights (ESCR) to the Non-Self-Governing and Trust Territories and individuals, including labour rights and the right to health, the right to education, and the right to an adequate standard of living.
The right to an adequate standard of living is enshrined in Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and Article 11 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

Decent work

dignity of workemploymentjust and favorable condition
The work referred to in Article 6 must be decent work.
The United Nations Economic and Social Council has given a General Comment that defines "decent work" and requires satisfaction of Article 7 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights: decent work is employment that "respects the fundamental rights of the human person as well as the rights of workers in terms of conditions of work safety and remuneration. ... respect for the physical and mental integrity of the worker in the exercise of his/her employment."

Right to food

foodaccess of foodadequate food
The right to adequate food, also referred to as the right to food, is interpreted as requiring "the availability of food in a quantity and quality sufficient to satisfy the dietary needs of individuals, free from adverse substances, and acceptable within a given culture".
The right is derived from the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights which has 160 state parties as of May 2012.

Right to work

right-to-workfreedom to workto work
Article 6 of the Covenant recognises the right to work, defined as the opportunity of everyone to gain their living by freely chosen or accepted work.
The right to work is enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and recognized in international human rights law through its inclusion in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, where the right to work emphasizes economic, social and cultural development.

Right to housing

housinghousing rightsRight to a home
The right to adequate housing, also referred to as the right to housing, is "the right to live somewhere in security, peace and dignity".
It is recognized in some national constitutions and in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

Compulsory education

compulsorycompulsory schoolingmass education
Article 14 of the Covenant requires those parties which have not yet established a system of free compulsory primary education, to rapidly adopt a detailed plan of action for its introduction "within a reasonable number of years".
International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights requires, within a reasonable number of years, the principle of compulsory education free of charge for all.

Free education

freefree schooltuition-free
Article 13 of the Covenant recognises the right of everyone to free education (free for the primary level and "the progressive introduction of free education" for the secondary and higher levels).
The Article 13 of International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights ensures the right to free education at primary education and progressive introduction of it at secondary and higher education as the right to education.

Working time

working hours9 to 5work day
These are in turn defined as fair wages with equal pay for equal work, sufficient to provide a decent living for workers and their dependants; safe working conditions; equal opportunity in the workplace; and sufficient rest and leisure, including limited working hours and regular, paid holidays.
The limitation of working hours is also proclaimed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and European Social Charter.

Higher education

higher learninghigherHigher Education Institution
Article 13 of the Covenant recognises the right of everyone to free education (free for the primary level and "the progressive introduction of free education" for the secondary and higher levels).
The UN International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights of 1966 declares, in Article 13, that "higher education shall be made equally accessible to all, on the basis of capacity, by every appropriate means, and in particular by the progressive introduction of free education".

Right to clothing

clothing
The right to adequate clothing, also referred to as the right to clothing, has not been authoritatively defined and has received little in the way of academic commentary or international discussion.
The right to adequate clothing, or the right to clothing, is recognized as a human right in various international human rights instruments; this, together with the right to food and the right to housing, are parts of the right to an adequate standard of living as recognized under [[International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights#Right to an adequate standard of living|Article 11]] of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR).

Labor rights

workers' rightslabour rightsworkers rights
It commits its parties to work toward the granting of economic, social, and cultural rights (ESCR) to the Non-Self-Governing and Trust Territories and individuals, including labour rights and the right to health, the right to education, and the right to an adequate standard of living.
The UN itself backed workers rights by incorporating several into two articles of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, which is the basis of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (article 6-8).

Strike action

strikestrikeslabor strike
Article 8 recognises the right of workers to form or join trade unions and protects the right to strike.
The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights adopted in 1967 ensure the right to strike in Article 8 and European Social Charter adopted in 1961 also ensure the right to strike in Article 6.

Freedom of education

educationeducational rightsfreedom to educate
Articles 13.3 and 13.4 require parties to respect the educational freedom of parents by allowing them to choose and establish private educational institutions for their children, also referred to as freedom of education.
Freedom of education is a constitutional (legal) concept that has been included in the European Convention on Human Rights, Protocol 1, Article 2, International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Article 13 and several national constitutions, e.g. the Belgian constitution (former article 17, now article 24) and the Dutch constitution (article 23).

Self-determination

self determinationright to self-determinationnational self-determination
Each would also contain an article on the right of all peoples to self-determination.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Universal Declaration on Human RightsUnited Nations Universal Declaration of Human RightsThe Universal Declaration of Human Rights
The ICESCR (and its [[Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights|Optional Protocol]]) is part of the International Bill of Human Rights, along with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), including the latter's [[First Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights|first]] and [[Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights|second]] Optional Protocols.
The Declaration has served as the foundation for two binding UN human rights covenants: the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.

International Bill of Human Rights

International Bill of RightsInternational Covenants on Human Rightsassociated covenants
The ICESCR (and its [[Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights|Optional Protocol]]) is part of the International Bill of Human Rights, along with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), including the latter's [[First Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights|first]] and [[Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights|second]] Optional Protocols.
It consists of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (adopted in 1948), the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR, 1966) with its two Optional Protocols and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR, 1966).

Human right to water and sanitation

right to waterwateraccess to water
The right to adequate food also implies a right to water.
The basis for this has been established through the constitutionalisation of economic, social and cultural Rights (ESCR) through one of two means: as "directive principles" that are goals and are often non-justiciable; or as expressly protected and enforceable through the courts.

Equal pay for equal work

equal payequal pay for womenpay equity
These are in turn defined as fair wages with equal pay for equal work, sufficient to provide a decent living for workers and their dependants; safe working conditions; equal opportunity in the workplace; and sufficient rest and leisure, including limited working hours and regular, paid holidays.
Equal pay for equal work is also covered by Article 7 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, Article 4 of the European Social Charter, and Article 15 of African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights.