International nonproprietary name

INNrINNINNsINNMgeneric nameinternational nonproprietary name (INN)Lithobid, Eskalithnon-proprietary namerecommended International Non-proprietary NameRecommended International Nonproprietary Name
The international nonproprietary name (INN) is an official generic and non-proprietary name given to a pharmaceutical drug or an active ingredient.wikipedia
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Drug nomenclature

trade name-oxacinDrug name
Having unambiguous standard names for each drug (standardization of drug nomenclature) is important because a drug may be sold by many different brand names, or a branded medication may contain more than one drug.
In the majority of circumstances, drugs have 3 types of names: chemical names, the most important of which is the IUPAC name; generic or nonproprietary names, the most important of which are the International Nonproprietary Names (INNs); and trade names, which are brand names.

Ritanserin

Ritanserin (INN, USAN, BAN) is a serotonin receptor antagonist which was never marketed for clinical use but has been used in scientific research.

Nomenclature of monoclonal antibodies

-amab-ciximabAntibody nomenclature
This naming scheme is used for both the World Health Organization’s International Nonproprietary Names (INN) and the United States Adopted Names (USAN) for pharmaceuticals.

Radiopharmaceutical

radiopharmaceuticalsMedicinal radiocompoundsMedicinal radiocompound
The International Nonproprietary Names (INNs), United States Pharmacopeia (USP) names, and IUPAC names for these agents are usually similar other than trivial style differences.

Paracetamol

acetaminophenPanadolTylenol PM
The WHO issues INNs in English, Latin, French, Russian, Spanish, Arabic, and Chinese, and a drug's INNs are often cognate across most or all of the languages, with minor spelling or pronunciation differences, for example: paracetamol (en) paracetamolum (la), paracétamol (fr) and парацетамол (ru).
Acetaminophen is the name generally used in the United States (United States Adopted Name), Japan (Japanese Accepted Name), Canada, Venezuela, Colombia, and Iran; paracetamol is used in international venues (International Nonproprietary Name, Australian Approved Name, British Approved Name).

Cephalosporin

cephalosporinsthird-generation cephalosporincefalosporin
This continues to be the preferred spelling in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, while European countries (including the United Kingdom) have adopted the International Nonproprietary Names, which are always spelled "cef-".

Mianserin

Mianserin is the English and German generic name of the drug and its INN and BAN, while mianserin hydrochloride is its USAN, BANM, and JAN.

British Approved Name

BANBANM
A number of spelling changes are made to British Approved Names and other older nonproprietary names with an eye toward interlingual standardization of pronunciation across major languages.
The BAN is also the official name used in some countries across the world, because starting in 1953, proposed new names were evaluated by a panel of experts from WHO in conjunction with the BP commission to ensure naming consistency worldwide (an effort leading to the International Nonproprietary Name system).

Lobenzarit

Lobenzarit (INN) is a drug used in the treatment of arthritis.

Australian Approved Name

AAN
In late 2016 the TGA changed several drug names to the corresponding INN, or in cases where the INN was not available (like with asparaginase) another generic name like the USAN.

Aciclovir

acyclovirZoviraxAcihexal
Aciclovir is the INN and BAN while acyclovir is the USAN and former BAN.

Cefalexin

cephalexinKeflexCefanex
Cefalexin is the INN, AAN and BAN while cephalexin is the USAN.

Generic drug

generic medicationgenericgeneric drugs
* Generic drug

Trademark distinctiveness

generic namegeneric termgeneric
The international nonproprietary name (INN) is an official generic and non-proprietary name given to a pharmaceutical drug or an active ingredient.

Brand

brand namemarquebrands
The international nonproprietary name (INN) is an official generic and non-proprietary name given to a pharmaceutical drug or an active ingredient.

Medication

pharmaceuticalpharmaceuticalspharmaceutical drug
The international nonproprietary name (INN) is an official generic and non-proprietary name given to a pharmaceutical drug or an active ingredient. Each drug's INN is unique but may contain a word stem that is shared with other drugs of the same class; for example, the beta blocker drugs propranolol and atenolol share the -olol suffix, and the benzodiazepine drugs lorazepam and diazepam share the -azepam suffix.

Active ingredient

active pharmaceutical ingredientactive pharmaceutical ingredientsactive ingredients
The international nonproprietary name (INN) is an official generic and non-proprietary name given to a pharmaceutical drug or an active ingredient.

Medical prescription

prescriptionprescriptionsprescribed
INNs make communication more precise by providing a unique standard name for each active ingredient, to avoid prescribing errors.

Standardization

standardstandardizedstandards
Having unambiguous standard names for each drug (standardization of drug nomenclature) is important because a drug may be sold by many different brand names, or a branded medication may contain more than one drug.

Citalopram

CelexaCipramilTalohexal
For example, the branded medications Celexa, Celapram and Citrol all contain the same active ingredient: citalopram; and the antibiotic widely known by the brand name Bactrim contains two active ingredients: trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole.

Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole

trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazoleco-trimoxazoleBactrim
For example, the branded medications Celexa, Celapram and Citrol all contain the same active ingredient: citalopram; and the antibiotic widely known by the brand name Bactrim contains two active ingredients: trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole.

Trimethoprim

PrimsolProloprimSulmeprim
For example, the branded medications Celexa, Celapram and Citrol all contain the same active ingredient: citalopram; and the antibiotic widely known by the brand name Bactrim contains two active ingredients: trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole.

Sulfamethoxazole

sulphamethoxazoleAzo GantanolGantanol
For example, the branded medications Celexa, Celapram and Citrol all contain the same active ingredient: citalopram; and the antibiotic widely known by the brand name Bactrim contains two active ingredients: trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole.

Beta blocker

beta blockersbeta-blockersbeta-blocker
Each drug's INN is unique but may contain a word stem that is shared with other drugs of the same class; for example, the beta blocker drugs propranolol and atenolol share the -olol suffix, and the benzodiazepine drugs lorazepam and diazepam share the -azepam suffix.

Propranolol

propanololInderalDexpropranolol
Each drug's INN is unique but may contain a word stem that is shared with other drugs of the same class; for example, the beta blocker drugs propranolol and atenolol share the -olol suffix, and the benzodiazepine drugs lorazepam and diazepam share the -azepam suffix.