International relations

international affairsinternational politicsforeign relationsInternational Studiesinterstate relationsrelationsforeign affairsinternationalinternational systemglobal affairs
International relations (IR) or international affairs (IA) — commonly also referred to as international studies (IS), global studies (GS), or global affairs (GA) — is the study of interconnectedness of politics, economics and law on a global level.wikipedia
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Political science

political scientistpolitical analystpolitical sciences
Depending on the academic institution, it is either a field of political science, an interdisciplinary academic field similar to global studies, or an entirely independent academic discipline in which students take a variety of internationally focused courses in social science and humanities disciplines.
Political science—occasionally called politicology—comprises numerous subfields, including comparative politics, political economy, international relations, political theory, public administration, public policy, and political methodology.

Politics

politicalpoliticianpolitically
International relations (IR) or international affairs (IA) — commonly also referred to as international studies (IS), global studies (GS), or global affairs (GA) — is the study of interconnectedness of politics, economics and law on a global level.
Politics is exercised on a wide range of social levels, from clans and tribes of traditional societies, through modern local governments, companies and institutions up to sovereign states, to the international level.

Foreign policy

foreign affairsforeignforeign relations
International relations is an academic and a public policy field, and so can be positive and normative, because it analyses and formulates the foreign policy of a given state.
A country's foreign policy, also called foreign relations or foreign affairs policy, consists of self-interest strategies chosen by the state to safeguard its national interests and to achieve goals within its international relations milieu.

International security

global securitysecurityinternational peace and security
The scope of international relations encompasses issues such as globalization, diplomatic relations, state sovereignty, international security, ecological sustainability, nuclear proliferation, nationalism, economic development, global finance, terrorism, and human rights.
It began as an independent field of study, but was absorbed as a sub-field of international relations.

Diplomacy

diplomatic relationsdiplomatdiplomatic
The scope of international relations encompasses issues such as globalization, diplomatic relations, state sovereignty, international security, ecological sustainability, nuclear proliferation, nationalism, economic development, global finance, terrorism, and human rights.
It usually refers to international diplomacy, the conduct of international relations through the intercession of professional diplomats with regard to a full range of topical issues.

Globalization

globalisationglobalizedglobal
The scope of international relations encompasses issues such as globalization, diplomatic relations, state sovereignty, international security, ecological sustainability, nuclear proliferation, nationalism, economic development, global finance, terrorism, and human rights.
They note the term was used "in education to describe the global life of the mind"; in international relations to describe the extension of the European Common Market; and in journalism to describe how the "American Negro and his problem are taking on a global significance".

Sovereign state

statestatessovereign states
The scope of international relations encompasses issues such as globalization, diplomatic relations, state sovereignty, international security, ecological sustainability, nuclear proliferation, nationalism, economic development, global finance, terrorism, and human rights. In all cases, the field studies relationships between political entities (polities) such as sovereign states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), international non-governmental organizations (INGOs), other non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs), and the wider world-systems produced by this interaction.
International law defines sovereign states as having a permanent population, defined territory, one government, and the capacity to enter into relations with other sovereign states.

Global studies

Global IssuesGlobalization StudiesGlobal and Transcultural Studies
Depending on the academic institution, it is either a field of political science, an interdisciplinary academic field similar to global studies, or an entirely independent academic discipline in which students take a variety of internationally focused courses in social science and humanities disciplines.
In cases such as international studies or international relations, the concept of 'national' confines the meaning of those fields of study.

School of Foreign Service

Georgetown UniversityGeorgetown University School of Foreign ServiceBachelor of Science in Foreign Service
Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service is the oldest international relations faculty in the United States, founded in 1919.
The Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, known simply as the School of Foreign Service or SFS, is a school of international relations at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. It is considered to be one of the world's leading international affairs schools, granting degrees at both undergraduate and graduate levels.

Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies

Graduate Institute of International StudiesGraduate InstituteThe Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
The first university entirely dedicated to the study of IR was the Graduate Institute of International Studies (now the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies), which was founded in 1927 to form diplomats associated to the League of Nations.
Founded in 1927, the Graduate Institute of International Studies (IHEI or HEI) is continental Europe's oldest school of international relations and was the world's first university dedicated solely to the study of international affairs.

Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy

the Fletcher School of Law and DiplomacyTufts UniversityFletcher School
The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, a collaboration between Tufts University and Harvard, opened its doors in 1933 as the first graduate-only school of international affairs in the United States.
The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University (also referred to as The Fletcher School or simply Fletcher) is the first and oldest graduate school in the United States dedicated solely to international affairs.

Liberalism (international relations)

liberalismliberalliberal international relations theory
Similarly, liberalism draws upon the work of Kant and Rousseau, with the work of the former often being cited as the first elaboration of democratic peace theory.
Rejection of power politics as the only possible outcome of international relations; it questions security/warfare principles of realism

Norman Paterson School of International Affairs

Carleton UniversityPaterson
In 1965, Glendon College and the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs were the first institutions in Canada to offer an undergraduate and a graduate program in international studies and affairs, respectively.
The Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (NPSIA ) is a professional school of international affairs at Carleton University that was founded in 1965.

Committee on International Relations (University of Chicago)

Committee on International RelationsCIR
The Committee on International Relations at the University of Chicago was the first to offer a graduate degree, in 1928.
It is the oldest international relations graduate program in the United States.

Social science

social sciencessocial scientistsocial
Depending on the academic institution, it is either a field of political science, an interdisciplinary academic field similar to global studies, or an entirely independent academic discipline in which students take a variety of internationally focused courses in social science and humanities disciplines.
Fields and subfields of political science include political economy, political theory and philosophy, civics and comparative politics, theory of direct democracy, apolitical governance, participatory direct democracy, national systems, cross-national political analysis, political development, international relations, foreign policy, international law, politics, public administration, administrative behaviour, public law, judicial behaviour, and public policy.

E. H. Carr

E.H. CarrEdward Hallett CarrEdward Carr
Early realists such as E. H. Carr and Hans Morgenthau argued that states are self-interested, power-seeking rational actors, who seek to maximize their security and chances of survival. Major theorists include E. H. Carr, Robert Gilpin, Joanne Gowa, Charles Kindleberger, Stephen Krasner, Hans Morgenthau, and Kenneth Waltz.
Edward Hallett "Ted" Carr (28 June 1892 – 3 November 1982) was an English historian, diplomat, journalist and international relations theorist, and an opponent of empiricism within historiography.

Hans Morgenthau

Hans J. MorgenthauMorgenthauMorgenthau Memorial Lecture
Early realists such as E. H. Carr and Hans Morgenthau argued that states are self-interested, power-seeking rational actors, who seek to maximize their security and chances of survival. Major theorists include E. H. Carr, Robert Gilpin, Joanne Gowa, Charles Kindleberger, Stephen Krasner, Hans Morgenthau, and Kenneth Waltz.
Hans Joachim Morgenthau (February 17, 1904 – July 19, 1980) was one of the major twentieth-century figures in the study of international politics.

Kenneth Waltz

WaltzWaltz, Kenneth N.
Major theorists include E. H. Carr, Robert Gilpin, Joanne Gowa, Charles Kindleberger, Stephen Krasner, Hans Morgenthau, and Kenneth Waltz.
Kenneth Neal Waltz (June 8, 1924 – May 12, 2013 ) was an American political scientist who was a member of the faculty at both the University of California, Berkeley and Columbia University and one of the most prominent scholars in the field of international relations.

Hedley Bull

H. N. Bull
Theorists such as Hedley Bull have postulated an international society in which various actors communicate and recognize common rules, institutions, and interests.
Hedley Norman Bull, FBA (10 June 1932 – 18 May 1985) was Professor of International Relations at the Australian National University, the London School of Economics and the University of Oxford until his death from cancer in 1985.

Michael W. Doyle

Michael Doyle
Major theorists include Montesquieu, Immanuel Kant, Robert Keohane, Michael W. Doyle, Francis Fukuyama, and Helen Milner.
Michael W. Doyle (born 1948) is an American international relations scholar best known as a theorist of the liberal "democratic peace" and author of " Liberalism and World Politics," the 16th most cited article in the 100-year history of the American Political Science Review.

Non-state actor

non-state actorsnon-statenon-state groups
Neoliberalism seeks to update liberalism by accepting the neorealist presumption that states are the key actors in international relations, but still maintains that non-state actors (NSAs) and intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) matter.
In international relations, non-state actors (NSAs) are individuals or groups that hold influence and which are wholly or partly independent of state governments.

Stephen D. Krasner

Krasner
Major theorists include E. H. Carr, Robert Gilpin, Joanne Gowa, Charles Kindleberger, Stephen Krasner, Hans Morgenthau, and Kenneth Waltz.
Stephen David Krasner (born 15 February 1942, New York) is an international relations professor at Stanford University and is a former Director of Policy Planning at the United States Department of State, a position he held from 2005 until April 2007 while on leave from Stanford.

Neoliberalism (international relations)

neoliberalismneoliberalsneoliberal
Neoliberalism seeks to update liberalism by accepting the neorealist presumption that states are the key actors in international relations, but still maintains that non-state actors (NSAs) and intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) matter.
In the study of international relations, neoliberalism refers to a school of thought which believes that states are, or at least should be, concerned first and foremost with absolute gains rather than relative gains to other states.

John Ikenberry

G. John IkenberryIkenberry, G. John
Prominent neoliberal institutionalists are Christina Davis, Judith L. Goldstein, G. John Ikenberry, Robert Keohane, Lisa Martin, and Joseph Nye.
Gilford John Ikenberry (October 5, 1954) is a theorist of international relations and United States foreign policy, and a professor of Politics and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University.

Regime theory

Institutionalism
Regime theory is derived from the liberal tradition that argues that international institutions or regimes affect the behaviour of states (or other international actors).
Regime theory is a theory within international relations derived from the liberal tradition that argues that international institutions or regimes affect the behavior of states or other international actors.