Internet service provider

ISPinternet service providersISPsInternet servicesInternet serviceInternetinternet providerInternet accessservice providersprovider
An Internet service provider (ISP) is an organization that provides services for accessing, using, or participating in the Internet.wikipedia
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Internet access

broadband internetbroadbandbroadband Internet access
Internet services typically provided by ISPs include Internet access, Internet transit, domain name registration, web hosting, Usenet service, and colocation.
Various technologies, at a wide range of speeds have been used by Internet service providers (ISPs) to provide this service.

Internet transit

transitIP TransitInternet transmission
Internet services typically provided by ISPs include Internet access, Internet transit, domain name registration, web hosting, Usenet service, and colocation.
Internet transit is the service of allowing network traffic to cross or "transit" a computer network, usually used to connect a smaller Internet service provider (ISP) to the larger Internet.

Usenet

newsnetnewsnewsgroup
Internet services typically provided by ISPs include Internet access, Internet transit, domain name registration, web hosting, Usenet service, and colocation.
Individual users may read messages from and post messages to a local server operated by a commercial usenet provider, their Internet service provider, university, employer, or their own server.

Internet

onlinethe Internetweb
An Internet service provider (ISP) is an organization that provides services for accessing, using, or participating in the Internet.
Commercial Internet service providers (ISPs) emerged in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Online service provider

online serviceInternetonline services
During the 1980s, online service providers such as CompuServe and America On Line (AOL) began to offer limited capabilities to access the Internet, such as e-mail interchange, but full access to the Internet was not readily available to the general public.
An online service provider can, for example, be an Internet service provider, an email provider, a news provider (press), an entertainment provider (music, movies), a search engine, an e-commerce site, an online banking site, a health site, an official government site, social media, a wiki, or a Usenet newsgroup.

AOL

America OnlineAOL MusicAOL.com
During the 1980s, online service providers such as CompuServe and America On Line (AOL) began to offer limited capabilities to access the Internet, such as e-mail interchange, but full access to the Internet was not readily available to the general public.
It originally provided a dial-up service to millions of Americans, as well as providing a web portal, e-mail, instant messaging and later a web browser following its purchase of Netscape.

CompuServe

CompuServe Information ServiceCISCompuServ
During the 1980s, online service providers such as CompuServe and America On Line (AOL) began to offer limited capabilities to access the Internet, such as e-mail interchange, but full access to the Internet was not readily available to the general public.
CIS finally introduced monthly pricing in late 1997, but by that time the number of users leaving all online services for dialup Internet service providers was reaching a climax.

The World (Internet service provider)

The WorldSoftware Tool & DieSoftware Tool and Die Company
In Brookline, Massachusetts, The World became the first commercial ISP in the US. Its first customer was served in November 1989.
The World is an Internet service provider originally headquartered in Brookline, Massachusetts.

Web hosting service

web hostinghostingwebsite hosting
Internet services typically provided by ISPs include Internet access, Internet transit, domain name registration, web hosting, Usenet service, and colocation.
Many Internet service providers (ISPs) offer this service free to subscribers.

Net neutrality

network neutralityinternet neutralityopen internet
On 23 April 2014, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) was reported to be considering a new rule that will permit ISPs to offer content providers a faster track to send content, thus reversing their earlier net neutrality position. Adoption of this notion would reclassify Internet service from one of information to one of the telecommunications and, according to Tom Wheeler, chairman of the FCC, ensure net neutrality.
Net neutrality is the principle that Internet service providers should treat all data equally and not discriminate or charge differently based on user, content, website, platform, application, type of equipment, or method of communication.

Net neutrality in the United States

net neutralitynetwork neutralityNet Neutrality rules
On 13 April 2015, the FCC published the final rule on its new "Net Neutrality" regulations.
In the United States, net neutrality, the principle that Internet service providers (ISPs) treat all data on the Internet the same, and not discriminate, has been an issue of contention between network users and access providers since the 1990s.

Dial-up Internet access

dial-updialupdial-up access
These companies generally offered dial-up connections, using the public telephone network to provide last-mile connections to their customers.
Dial-up Internet access is a form of Internet access that uses the facilities of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to establish a connection to an Internet service provider (ISP) by dialing a telephone number on a conventional telephone line.

Common carrier

carriercommon carrierscommon-carrier
On 31 January 2015, AP News reported that the FCC will present the notion of applying ("with some caveats") Title II (common carrier) of the Communications Act of 1934 to the Internet in a vote expected on 26 February 2015. On 26 February 2015, the FCC ruled in favor of net neutrality by adopting Title II (common carrier) of the Communications Act of 1934 and [[Telecommunications policy of the United States#Broadband deployment policy objectives|Section 706 in the Telecommunications Act of 1996]] to the Internet.
Public airlines, railroads, bus lines, taxicab companies, phone companies, internet service providers, cruise ships, motor carriers (i.e., canal operating companies, trucking companies), and other freight companies generally operate as common carriers.

Digital subscriber line

DSLxDSLDigital Subscriber Line (DSL)
However, cable television companies and the telephone carriers already had wired connections to their customers and could offer Internet connections at much higher speeds than dial-up using broadband technology such as cable modems and digital subscriber line (DSL).
Once upstream and downstream circuits are established, a subscriber can connect to a service such as an Internet service provider or other network services, like a corporate MPLS network.

Telecommunications policy of the United States

Section 706telecommunications policyAmerican telecommunications policy
On 26 February 2015, the FCC ruled in favor of net neutrality by adopting Title II (common carrier) of the Communications Act of 1934 and [[Telecommunications policy of the United States#Broadband deployment policy objectives|Section 706 in the Telecommunications Act of 1996]] to the Internet.
While the telephone providers are required to be common carriers, there is an ongoing net neutrality debate about the obligations of ISP's.

UUCP

bang pathUUCPNETUnix to Unix Copy Program
Other companies and organizations joined by direct connection to the backbone, or by arrangements through other connected companies, sometime using dialup tools such as UUCP.
UUCP usage began to die out with the rise of Internet service providers offering inexpensive SLIP and PPP services.

Telecommunications service provider

telecomtelecommunicationstelecommunications provider
Adoption of this notion would reclassify Internet service from one of information to one of the telecommunications and, according to Tom Wheeler, chairman of the FCC, ensure net neutrality.
While some people use the terms "telecom service provider" and "communications service provider" interchangeably, the term TSP generally excludes Internet service providers (ISPs), cable television companies, satellite TV, and managed service providers.

Outlook.com

HotmailPeopleCalendar
Many mailbox providers are also access providers, while others are not (e.g., Gmail, Yahoo! Mail, Outlook.com, AOL Mail, Po box).
It was commercially launched on July 4, 1996, symbolizing "freedom" from ISP-based email and the ability to access a user's inbox from anywhere in the world.

Virtual ISP

A virtual ISP (VISP) is an operation that purchases services from another ISP, sometimes called a wholesale ISP in this context, which allow the VISP's customers to access the Internet using services and infrastructure owned and operated by the wholesale ISP.
A Virtual ISP (VISP), also known as an Affinity ISP, is an Internet Service Provider (ISP) that resells the resources of existing ISPs under another brand name.

Wireless Internet service provider

WISPwirelessWireless ISPs
A wireless Internet service provider (WISP) is an Internet service provider with a network based on wireless networking.
A wireless Internet service provider (WISP) is an Internet service provider with a network based on wireless networking.

Internet exchange point

Internet exchangeInternet exchange pointsIXP
ISPs may engage in peering, where multiple ISPs interconnect at peering points or Internet exchange points (IXs), allowing routing of data between each network, without charging one another for the data transmitted—data that would otherwise have passed through a third upstream ISP, incurring charges from the upstream ISP.
An Internet exchange point (IX or IXP) is the physical infrastructure through which Internet service providers (ISPs) and content delivery networks (CDNs) exchange Internet traffic between their networks (autonomous systems).

Competitive local exchange carrier

CLECcompeting carrierCompetitive Local Exchange Carriers
VISPs resemble mobile virtual network operators and competitive local exchange carriers for voice communications.
A data local exchange carrier (DLEC) is a CLEC specializing in DSL services by leasing lines from the ILEC and reselling them to Internet service providers (ISPs).

Webmail

web-based emailweb mailweb-based e-mail
The task is typically accomplished by implementing Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) and possibly providing access to messages through Internet Message Access Protocol (IMAP), the Post Office Protocol, Webmail, or a proprietary protocol.
Many webmail providers also offer email access by a desktop email client using standard email protocols, while many internet service providers provide a webmail client as part of the email service included in their internet service package.

Point of presence

points of presencePOPPOPs
ISPs with more than one point of presence (PoP) may have separate connections to an upstream ISP at multiple PoPs, or they may be customers of multiple upstream ISPs and may have connections to each one of them at one or more point of presence.
A common example is an Internet point of presence, the local access point that allows users to connect to the Internet with their Internet service provider (ISP).

Wi-Fi

WiFiwireless internetwireless
Available technologies have ranged from computer modems with acoustic couplers to telephone lines, to television cable (CATV), Wi-Fi, and fiber optics.
Providing access to one's Internet connection in this fashion may breach the Terms of Service or contract with the ISP.