Interracial marriage in the United States

interracial marriageinterracialinterracial bans on marriageinterracial coupleracial exogamyinter-racial marriageintermarriageInterracial marriagesinterracial marriages in the U.S.marriage
US miscegenation.svg:wikipedia
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Loving v. Virginia

Mildred LovingRichard LovingLoving v Virginia
]]Interracial marriage in the United States has been legal in all U.S. states since the 1967 U.S. Supreme Court (Warren Court) decision Loving v. Virginia that deemed "anti-miscegenation" laws unconstitutional. However, the most tenacious form of legal segregation, the banning of interracial marriage, was not fully lifted until the last anti-miscegenation laws were struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice Earl Warren in a unanimous ruling Loving v. Virginia.
The decision was followed by an increase in interracial marriages in the U.S. and is remembered annually on Loving Day.

Loving Day

The court's decision, which was made on June 12, 1967, has been commemorated every year on the Loving Day.
Loving Day is an annual celebration held on June 12, the anniversary of the 1967 United States Supreme Court decision Loving v. Virginia which struck down all anti-miscegenation laws remaining in sixteen U.S. states.

Anti-miscegenation laws in the United States

anti-miscegenation lawsanti-miscegenationanti-miscegenation law
]]Interracial marriage in the United States has been legal in all U.S. states since the 1967 U.S. Supreme Court (Warren Court) decision Loving v. Virginia that deemed "anti-miscegenation" laws unconstitutional.
At least three proposed constitutional amendments intended to bar interracial marriage in the United States were introduced in Congress.

Racial segregation

segregationsegregatedsegregationist
In Social Trends in America and Strategic Approaches to the Negro Problem (1948), Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal ranked the social areas where restrictions were imposed on the freedom of Black Americans by Southern White Americans through racial segregation, from the least to the most important: basic public facility access, social equality, jobs, courts and police, politics and marriage.
Many U.S. states banned interracial marriage.

Multiracial Americans

two or more racesof two or more racesTwo or more races (Multiracial)
Native Americans are more likely than any other racial group to practice racial exogamy, resulting in an ever-declining proportion of indigenous blood among those who claim a Native American identity.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
Filipino Americans have frequently married Native American and Alaskan Native people.
Native Americans are more likely than any other racial group to practice interracial marriage, resulting in an ever-declining proportion of indigenous blood among those who claim a Native American identity.

U.S. state

StatestatesU. S. state
]]Interracial marriage in the United States has been legal in all U.S. states since the 1967 U.S. Supreme Court (Warren Court) decision Loving v. Virginia that deemed "anti-miscegenation" laws unconstitutional.

Warren Court

Warrendue process revolutionthe Warren majorities
]]Interracial marriage in the United States has been legal in all U.S. states since the 1967 U.S. Supreme Court (Warren Court) decision Loving v. Virginia that deemed "anti-miscegenation" laws unconstitutional.

Earl Warren

WarrenChief Justice Earl WarrenChief Justice Warren
Chief Justice Earl Warren wrote in the court opinion that "the freedom to marry, or not marry, a person of another race resides with the individual, and cannot be infringed by the State." However, the most tenacious form of legal segregation, the banning of interracial marriage, was not fully lifted until the last anti-miscegenation laws were struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice Earl Warren in a unanimous ruling Loving v. Virginia.

Interracial marriage

intermarriageinterracial datinginterracial
The proportion of interracial marriages as a proportion of all marriages has been increasing since 1967, such that 15.1% of all new marriages in the United States were interracial marriages by 2010 compared to a low single-digit percentage in the mid 20th century.

Gender

gender issuessexgenders
The proportion of interracial marriages is markedly different depending on the ethnicity and gender of the spouses.

Gunnar Myrdal

Myrdal, GunnarGunnarKarl Gunnar Myrdal
In Social Trends in America and Strategic Approaches to the Negro Problem (1948), Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal ranked the social areas where restrictions were imposed on the freedom of Black Americans by Southern White Americans through racial segregation, from the least to the most important: basic public facility access, social equality, jobs, courts and police, politics and marriage.

Southern United States

SouthSouthernAmerican South
In Social Trends in America and Strategic Approaches to the Negro Problem (1948), Swedish economist Gunnar Myrdal ranked the social areas where restrictions were imposed on the freedom of Black Americans by Southern White Americans through racial segregation, from the least to the most important: basic public facility access, social equality, jobs, courts and police, politics and marriage.

Desegregation in the United States

desegregationdesegregateddesegregate
This ranking scheme illustrates the manner in which the barriers against desegregation fell: Of less importance was the segregation in basic public facilities, which was abolished with the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Civil Rights Act of 1964

Civil Rights ActTitle VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964Title VII
This ranking scheme illustrates the manner in which the barriers against desegregation fell: Of less importance was the segregation in basic public facilities, which was abolished with the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Anti-miscegenation laws

mixed marriageanti-miscegenationmixed marriages
However, the most tenacious form of legal segregation, the banning of interracial marriage, was not fully lifted until the last anti-miscegenation laws were struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice Earl Warren in a unanimous ruling Loving v. Virginia.

Supreme Court of the United States

United States Supreme CourtU.S. Supreme CourtSupreme Court
]]Interracial marriage in the United States has been legal in all U.S. states since the 1967 U.S. Supreme Court (Warren Court) decision Loving v. Virginia that deemed "anti-miscegenation" laws unconstitutional. However, the most tenacious form of legal segregation, the banning of interracial marriage, was not fully lifted until the last anti-miscegenation laws were struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice Earl Warren in a unanimous ruling Loving v. Virginia.

Generation

generationsList of generationsgenerate
The differing ages of individuals, culminating in the generation divides, have traditionally played a large role in how mixed ethnic couples are perceived in American society.

Ethnic group

ethnicityethnicethnic groups
The proportion of interracial marriages is markedly different depending on the ethnicity and gender of the spouses. The differing ages of individuals, culminating in the generation divides, have traditionally played a large role in how mixed ethnic couples are perceived in American society.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The differing ages of individuals, culminating in the generation divides, have traditionally played a large role in how mixed ethnic couples are perceived in American society.

Egalitarianism

egalitarianequalityEconomic egalitarianism
Interracial marriages have typically been highlighted through two points of view in the United States: Egalitarianism and cultural conservatism.

Tradition

traditionaltraditionscustom
Interracial marriages have typically been highlighted through two points of view in the United States: Egalitarianism and cultural conservatism.

Taboo

taboossexual tabooimpolite
Egalitarianism's view of interracial marriage is acceptance of the phenomenon, while traditionalists view interracial marriage as taboo and as socially unacceptable.

Social enterprise

social enterprisesCommunity Enterprise CentreFreer Spreckley
Social enterprise research conducted on behalf of the Columbia Business School (2005–2007) showed that regional differences within the United States in how interracial relationships are perceived have persisted: Daters of both sexes from south of the Mason–Dixon line were found to have much stronger same-race preferences than northern daters did.

Columbia Business School

Columbia University Graduate School of BusinessGraduate School of BusinessColumbia Graduate School of Business
Social enterprise research conducted on behalf of the Columbia Business School (2005–2007) showed that regional differences within the United States in how interracial relationships are perceived have persisted: Daters of both sexes from south of the Mason–Dixon line were found to have much stronger same-race preferences than northern daters did.